flooring im afraid!

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by steviep68, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. steviep68

    steviep68
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    i read on the forums somewhere that concrete flooring was to be avoided as far as good sound with a sub is concerned.

    i used to live in such a house and thought my sound system sounded great, i have moved to a top floor apartment now { divorce!} and have far better equipment than i used to have{she didnt take it all!} but it has wood flooring and a flat below, and the bass now just seems to boom and sounds sort of hollow.

    nothing i can do dont suppose?
     
  2. mhuk05

    mhuk05
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  3. Ian J

    Ian J
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  4. HMHB

    HMHB
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    So would a sub isolation platform cure my problem ?
    My flooring is the square chipboard style flooring that seems to be in most newer houses and i get loads of vibration through the floor and have to remove the guard from the front of the gas fire as it rattles all the time when I'm watching a film !
     
  5. Ian J

    Ian J
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    It should help but why not post the question in the Room Acoustics forum and Matt will give you an honest answer
     
  6. Nimby

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    There is no telling what will vibrate at particular frequencies.

    When we replaced our twin DIY bandpass subs (which easily managed under 20Hz at around 100dB) my wife would tell me that her seed trays were rattling in the greenhouse. The culprit was the new SVS cylinder. It makes everything rattle. We have boarded floors upstairs too. The floor in the listening feels like it is melting under our chairs with some film effects. Nobody believed me when I posted about this. "Hype!" they said. "Exaggeration!" they said. "Nope!" I said (amongst other things) .:devil:
     
  7. PJTX100

    PJTX100
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    Years ago spiking into concrete was the be-all-and-end-all of rigidity and acoustic heaven for speakers. How times change!
     
  8. Andywilliams

    Andywilliams
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    Concrete flooring is better for speakers i cant remember having seen that suspended floor is better as above concrete has much better isolating properties.Years ago when i had a linn sondek lp12 it was standing on a plinth of concrete slab with wood surround and tiled top and did a great job of stopping any feedback to the turntable so imo suspended is worse.
     
  9. rags

    rags
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    Wood suspended flooring isnt too great - probably worse than solid concrete. I used to have lots of vibration on my floor - from experience an isolation platform should help considerably.
     
  10. HMHB

    HMHB
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    It shows how much attention I pay as I didn't realise we had a section for that :D
     
  11. Nimby

    Nimby
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    Nor did I. :rolleyes:

    Aren't they somewhere on the third floor? ;)
     
  12. mattym

    mattym
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    ideally you need to stop the structure(in this case the floor) from vibrating, you have choices, commercial and DIY, you can buy an isolation platform, which is basically a flat board attached to some foam, the idea being to stop the vibrations from the sub travelling into the floor, the foam rubber is supposed to reduce this, some types have a metal top, and some have a wood top, the deformation of the isolation medium is the key, if it deforms too much it will not work, if it deforms too little it wont be as effective as it could. the most efficient way to do it is to have a hard surface(paving slab, chopping block), then a platform(bought or diy) and the sub, this should give you a good mass/spring/mass assembly, which SHOULD reduce transmission.

    You can make your own with various items, squash balls seem popular and work well enough if the right softness is used

    Commercial options are Gramma from Auralex, Acoustipro's item, and my own platform, as well as spikes and cones etc

    Moving the sub a few inches can make a big difference too..worth experimenting with position and hosehold items before dipping into the kitty.
     
  13. paulst10

    paulst10
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    second that, i have wooden floor and it feels like my svs is ripping it up :thumbsup: , i did however, manage to get hold of a bit of acoustic foam from work, and cut it just smaller than the baseplate on the pb12+ and it has made a bit of an improvement... but it hasnt cured the problem completely... at higher volumes (than before) i still get the melting feeling.

    but as i plan on moving soon, i am not too worried about it... i just hope the next place i like the look of, has concrete floors ;)
     
  14. steviep68

    steviep68
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    couple of things related to whats been said.

    i have a pv1 which sends no vibration from the casing into the floor, but obviously the sound waves are affected by the floor i would guess.

    i also have the sub on what could be called an isolation platform of sorts,
    its a marble tile with carpet on top, cant tell the difference to be honest between the sound before the tile and now, is this not suitable or the same sort of thing?

    i should also say that although i have wooden floors as mentioned before, they do have underlay and carpet on top.
     
  15. the mechanic

    the mechanic
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    Hi all,
    I have a laminate wood floor over wooden floor boards in my room and the whole room throbbed whenever both my subs were running (M&K is a front firer and the VIBE a down firer).
    The solution (for me anyway) was to fasten the M&K onto two layers of 25mm worktop glued n screwed together then spiked to the floor. The VIBE was a different matter though, I have used two 15mm thick plates of HDF with a sandwich of dynamat between them. The VIBE is spiked to the top surface whilst the underside is isolated from the floor using a trio of mitchell tenderfeet which are facing spikes up to protect the laminate floor, (the M&K is hidden from SWMBO, so I could get away with spiking it the normal way :D ).
    These two simple and cheap mods have virtually elimiated unwanted rattles from various fittings and fixtures around the house, and more importantly tightened the bass response no end as both subs now only move air about, rather than the floor like they were before.

    Graham.
     

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