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Fixed Frame or Electric?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Les E, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. Les E

    Les E
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    I have been adamant that I will go for a mounted fixed frame screen for the Screenplay 5700 mainly because it will be in a dedicated room and I have no intention to install a plasma on the same wall space. So this seems the best option as I won't be moving the screen for any purpose...

    However...

    ...I have read a few posts here and there about controlling the aspect ratios on the screen (although this seems alot of messing prior to watching the film...unless you can have presets for the screen drop ie. 235.1, 16.9 etc???).

    And recently my sister-in-law has just had a littl'un which (and I know this shouldn't have any influence...but...) she will probably be popping around for disney cartoon showings when she gets a bit older and I don't relish the prospect of sticky fingerprints on an exspensive fixed screen (can you clean the fabric?...shudder!!!). So an electric one does seem appealling with this in mind.

    With the exception of the niece's visit, is there any major points I should think about to sway my judgement on the purchase? :eek:
     
  2. Misty

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    Hi, have just finished making a 10 foot wide 16:9 fixed screen and can highly recommend it. Total cost came to around £250 for all materials and the purchase of a new mitre saw. Sourced screen material from www.drhscreens.co.uk, self adhesive black velvet for the frame from www.nexnix.co.uk, velcro to attach to frame & screen material from a fabric store and the wood to make the frame from a local timber merchant. Only cut myself once making it but did have a few screaming sessions with the other half when things got tricky sticking the velvet onto the frame but now it is up on the wall and looking sexy makes it worth the investment of £250, a couple of evenings fabricating it & divorce proceedings from the other half!

    Screen material can be cleaned easily if caught early with a damp cloth, be careful of the velvet on the frame, kiddies may like scuffing it !!!

    This size static screen would normally cost you around £800+ if bought pre made. Kinda made sense to make it.

    Hope this helps and good luck.
     
  3. Les E

    Les E
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    That's really great...helluva saving there! However, not brilliant with the ol' DIY and anything I do I never feel it's a good enough job!! :thumbsdow

    I don't suppose you have any photos you can post?

    The screens I have been looking at are around the £700 region so I can totally agree with the DIY side of it!
     
  4. Misty

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    Seriously mate, it's a piece of cake to do. I am Sooooooooooo CR*P at DIY it's a joke. Just get the wood pre-cut roughly to size, then take it nice and slow when cutting it with a mitre saw - £16 at Homebase set the angle to 90 degrees and away you go. Use www.projectorcentral.com to calculate the material size in feet and inches or meters and centimeters then over run the height and width by about 2 inches to allow excess to velcro or staple to the frame.

    Trust me it is a doddle. :thumbsup:

    Will post a couple of shots later on, have just noticed a small wrinkle that needs to be stretched out so will fire off the photos once that has been done. Using velcro allows you to adjust the material once it's mounted, staples make it a bit permanent.

    Go on spoil yourself. 10 foot wide that's 136" on the diagonal ... You know it makes sense. :D
     
  5. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    When folk come around with sticky fingers just throw a blanket over the thing....

    Gordon
     
  6. digisocialist

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    I too am in a similar dilema. The wife is adamant we shouldn't have a screen but this I believe is because she finds the idea of pulling something down very aesthetically awkward (I think she has flasbacks to her parents slide shows in the 70's)!

    Anyway, I have a SP4805. I have literally 15mins ago painted the area of the wall I am projecting onto with the 1st coat of IceStorm6 (I imagine this will be an improvement on the green wall). I am slightly concerned now that I have worked this out wrong. I left the projector on it's Native setting (not 16:9) and ran a test image of Monsters Inc to obtain the creen dimensions I wanted, marked out the area and then painted.

    I think my situation is ideal for fixed screen too as I have a dedicated room and due to short throw distance etc, very little room if any for changing the image size. I'd like to see pictures of the fixed screen...it may well inspire me. :) My local Hi-Fi dealer reckons too that the self made fixed screen is the way to go!
     
  7. Misty

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    OK, have discovered I have screwed the screen about 1/2 cm lower on the right than on the left which is causing a few wrinkles but I thought you guys might still want a look. Forgive the dodgy photo - I'm no David Bailey.

    Hope jpg is ok, had to mess about in paint to get it the right file size and res. If it's buggered shout and I can send to a hotmail address if you like.

    Will try to sort the screen level out this weekend and get some corrected screen shots out then.

    Before anybody says - I know covering the entire wall is a tad excessive but remember this is Home Cinema not Home TV :devil:
     

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  8. ReTrO

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    A set of curtains to draw across the fixed screen when not in use, or needing to be hidden?

    Then you have a very cinema feel room. :)
     
  9. Misty

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    Glad you mentioned the curtain idea. The Living Room is looking a bit demo room at the mo, will ponder on the idea. Still kinda get a kick out of seeing peoples faces as they walk in and are presented with a 136" diagonal screen. It makes the effort of making it worthwhile.

    Will start drawing up the plans for the best looking curtain material and method of drawing them over the coming weeks. Electric mechanism might have to be done then run that of a contact closure from the Denon when it comes out of standby.

    I'm starting to warm to idea as I'm writhing this reply. Gonna do it :thumbsup: , electric kit shouldn't be too steep. Will keep you guys posted and fire some work in progress shots as and when.

    Thanks for the idea.
     
  10. simon40

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    Misty,

    I notice you appear to have light coloured walls (magnolia?) and a white ceiling and are using a Sony HS50. How do you find the picture quality (contrast)? Curious, since I am considering an HS50.

    Thanks Simon
     
  11. Misty

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    The walls and ceiling colour are a problem but we cannot re-paint as currently renting. Ideal would be a muted shark grey or deep russet/burgandy. If you can paint the walls either of those colours you should be onto a winner. Still a great picture just not as good as it could be.
     
  12. CAS FAN

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    Unfortunately I don't have a dedicated room as it has to double as my work office. Instead I went for a fixed frame screen that can be easily moved and stored out of the way. The only place I could put it was over the window and it hangs here on two large screws. Basically I built a wooden frame out of some wood (from B&Q) and then stretched & stapled some Blackout fabric (from my local fabric store) over the frame. The result gives a great picture & only cost £15 to make! There's a picture of it on this thread on post 52.
     
  13. Docta teef

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    Misty how did you go about streching the fabric over the frame? as this is exactly what im looking to do
     
  14. CAS FAN

    CAS FAN
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    Basically you just put a staple in the middle of the top and then stretch down & put one in the middle of the bottom (pulling the fabric as taught as poss. then do the same with each side. Then working along each side move out from the centre (each way) and keep pulling tight whilst stapling. Tidy up your corners & job done. :thumbsup:
     
  15. avanzato

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    My experience is that stretching and staping fabiric is quite easy. Though wanting to try something a bit different I have just finished assembling my new fixed screen which uses flyscreen framing. It does flex a bit if you get the tension wrong and prefers a rigid mounting but the fabric fits using a spline system so I can easily remove the material if I want to upgrade in the future.
     
  16. Misty

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    Hi docta teef, the best way to attach the fabric is as follows. First use a good quality stable gun to stable velcro to the frame. Then stitch the other side of the velcro to the white side of the screen fabric, this will give you a consistant pull against the material. If you staple the material directly to the fram you only have a fix at the points where you have stapled, using velcro gives you a continuous fix. This is how all the good quality companies make thier screens - VUTEC - for example.

    I think this will be the best but also the most labour intensive way to do it but if ya gonna do it - DO IT RIGHT!!
     
  17. rajiveaggarwal

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    Stewart fixed screens use "popper" type buttons spaced at 10" all around the frame. Seems to me that stapling would achieve a similar result if stretched taut. Never seen a wrinkle in the Stewart.
     
  18. inzaman

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    When i made a fabric screen i used velcro all the way round to attach the screen to the frame, incase i ever wanted to remove it never did though, but that also works well and i had no ripples etc.
     
  19. Misty

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    Inzaman you hit nail right on the head. As I am in a rented flat the ability to dismantle the screen is vital. Using staples would eventually trash the fabric, with velcro this is no longer an issue.

    I agree Stewart screens knock the snot out of eveything and use a push stud button system which is highly effective and could possibly be achieved in a DIY situation if you use a fabric which will stretch but the fabric I purchased has very little give as it is designed for roller systems so the velcro route seemed to be the best way forward.
     
  20. inzaman

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    I purchased a hot glue gun and glued the velcro to the fabric and frame, i think that stitching would be the better solution although time consuming, especially if you are going to be using bo material.

    The problem with glueing bo material is that it has a kind of rubber backing that will peel before the Velcro if you are trying to remove this from the frame, but if this is stitched then no problem.
     
  21. Docta teef

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    Velcro very clever wouldnt have thought of that cheers.
     

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