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Fitting a screen to the ceiling

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by skimber, Dec 4, 2001.

  1. skimber

    skimber
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    Ok, my 180x180 "Economy Weight" screen has arrived from www.a-v.co.uk this afternoon... but i don't know how to actually fit it up... can anyone throw me any advice on the following:

    - how do i find a joist? I know that they run parralel to the orientation i want for my screen.

    - How long do the screws need to be

    Ok, so i know this is more a DIY question, but i'm sure there are other home cinema newbies like me who have thses sort of initial stumbling blocks!

    Cheers

    Simon
     
  2. Roland @ B4

    Roland @ B4
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    Most builders put their joists at 12" or 13" centres and a joist should be 2" wide.

    I'm not famillier with your screens fixing system but I would recon on the screws needing to be at least 2" long. No 10 with a round head and probably a washer.

    If the wall you are closest to is supporting you can recon the first joist will be very close to the wall the next depending on which end the chipie started should be 12 to 13" away.

    Short of using one of these joist detectors from Hire shops or DIY stores. Good old bang a nail in once an inch until you hit one.

    You could try tapping and waiting for the dull thud (I've found to be very unrelieable.

    You could look in the room above, lift the carpet and measure where the nail heads are.


    I personally use a lady called Daphne who only wears purple but is magik with a which hazel stick and can piont out water, joists and just about any thing. she only works during certain phases of the moon though which is a bugger when you are trying to plan instals.

    I hope the above helps.
     
  3. skimber

    skimber
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    Thanks for that!!

    Should i use plugs or just drill a pilot hole and screw directly into the joist?
     
  4. paulsa

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    hi one newbie to another:) after you locate the joist, just drill small pilot holes,no plugs required, as the screws (size roland mentioned) will bite into the wood and be more than adequite,good luck i`m, jealous as i`ve not even managed to find a projector i want yet.:confused:
     
  5. General Skanky

    General Skanky
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    Go to www.screwfix.com to get (an idea at least) what you need.
    I use their wood screws for everything. They are excellent and will hold the weight of big fat people like me ten fold. So projector screens etc are no problem. They will bite hard and fast into a joist no problem!
     
  6. skimber

    skimber
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    Well it's up! now i'm just waiting (im)patiently for the projector to arrive!!

    My cheap little digital camera seems to make the room change colour when the screen is down!
     

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  7. RichardA

    RichardA
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    Simon,

    For interest, the reason your camera changes colour when the screen is down is auto colour balance.

    With the screen up, the brightest part of the view is the daylight coming through the window - the camera assumes this is correct white.

    With the screen down the brightest part of the view is the interior lights, and these are assumed to be white.

    Daylight is a much higher colour temperature (6500K) than tungsten lights (3600K). Higher colour temperatures tend to look bluer, lower temperatures look redder.
    The 'colour temperature' is simply the temperature in degrees Kelvin (same as degrees Centigrade, but measured from absolute 0 rather than freezing point) that you would have to heat a lump of black coloured metal to for it to glow this colour.

    What the heck has this to do with home cinema?

    Well if you have any lights in your room near the screen you may notice a colour shift in the picture between when the light is on and when it's off because the Human eye and brain work in a similar way to your camera and adapts to suit what it thinks is white - so if you have a 'low' temperature lamp near the screen, the screen could start to look too blue.

    I hope this may be of some interest, even if some way off the original thread!
     
  8. skimber

    skimber
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    Thankyou sir!

    Can we play with the bunsen burners now? :D
     
  9. Paul D

    Paul D
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    Richard has a good point.

    If you look at something long enough your eyes will adapt.

    I had a SonyVW10HT LCD projector. I knew it was a little blue-ish on the colour balance side of things. I was going to get it ISF colour calibrated by Gordon Fraser etc. But the longer i had it, the more even the colour seemed.

    However!

    Last week i was taking some new screen shots of my new CRT. When i came across some old Sony LCD screen shots. I was amazed how greenish blue the picture was.

    The shots below were taken with the same camera film type etc. But the First shot (new CRT) was before it was fully setup up. So is no indication of the stunning picture now on offer. I may take the same shot and post here later.

    Shot 1 Barcodata 808s (not fully setup etc)

    [​IMG]


    Shot 2 SonyVW10HT (not ISF tweaked!)

    [​IMG]

    So you cannot rely on your own eyes!

    So if anybody has any doubts about their colour balance/temp. They should get in touch with somebody like Gordon, and get properly setup.
     

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