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First attempt at HDR

A

Alliecampbell

Guest
I have seen a few HDR images recently so thought id have a go. I have a trial version of Pixmantec hence why the HDR image Is watermarked. I would appreciate your thoughts on the image as to wether i am on the right track.
 

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Jazz Monkey Jr

Distinguished Member
Really good shot, looks much better than the original. That's why digital photography is so good, the amount of effects and improvements you can make is outstanding. :smashin:
Another reason to use RAW.
 

Zone

Moderator
I probably go against the grain here as I think the end results look too digitized with the sky looking too unreal.

I'd personally bracket the shot in camera and merge them in PS if the exposure was tricky, ideally I'd use ND filters to bring the sky down and hold some detail.

I love digital but I must confess I think some of these programs push things a little too far, imo of course.
 

Valleyman

Established Member
It gives an interesting end result which looks pretty good, though I'd have to say the original source is probably a little too well exposed all over for the HDR to work to it's full advantage.

HDR looks best when you would normally have either an underexposed foreground or an overexposed sky. The orignal picture here has both reasonably well exposed so adding more range doesn't really improve the exposure in a part of the picture, it simply adds the HDR effect.

Sunsets/Sunrises with a normally underexposed foreground can look awsome.
 
A

Alliecampbell

Guest
Zone said:
I probably go against the grain here as I think the end results look too digitized with the sky looking too unreal.

I'd personally bracket the shot in camera and merge them in PS if the exposure was tricky, ideally I'd use ND filters to bring the sky down and hold some detail.

I love digital but I must confess I think some of these programs push things a little too far, imo of course.

Thanks for the comments zone they are all welcome. :) :) Where do you get your ND filters as none of the shops round here have any? And what sort would you recommend?

Alliec
 
A

Alliecampbell

Guest
Valleyman said:
It gives an interesting end result which looks pretty good, though I'd have to say the original source is probably a little too well exposed all over for the HDR to work to it's full advantage.

HDR looks best when you would normally have either an underexposed foreground or an overexposed sky. The orignal picture here has both reasonably well exposed so adding more range doesn't really improve the exposure in a part of the picture, it simply adds the HDR effect.

Sunsets/Sunrises with a normally underexposed foreground can look awsome.

Valleyman..your right the original image is not ideally suited to HDR, however i was impatient:D and had deleted all the pics that may have been better suited and couldnt wait;). Im going to try and take some more pics which will be better suited and try again.

Thanks for the comments its appreciated.
 

Zone

Moderator
Alliecampbell said:
Thanks for the comments zone they are all welcome. :) :) Where do you get your ND filters as none of the shops round here have any? And what sort would you recommend?

Alliec

Allie
Depends on what camera/lens combinations you're using.
Assuming you’re using DSLR then I would go for Cokin square filters as a reasonably priced system.
Their P series holder and filters are suitable for lenses with a diameter of between 48 and 82mm, if you have any lenses wider than that then you’d need to look at their X-Pro or Z-Pro systems. There are other filter maunfacturers that make filters compatible with the Cokin system as well such as Hi-Tech and Singh Ray so plenty of choice.

With regards the filters themselves, then you have the choice of ND2 ND4 and ND8, the effect of the filters density gradually increasing from (usually) the centre to the top with the start of the gradation being either soft or hard, you would use a soft if there were no distinct horizon line and the vice versa for the hard step filters, you can also get full ND grads that have the effect over the whole of the filter, useful the when there is too much light and you want a slower shutter speed or a wider aperture.

The ND2 is equivalent to 1 stop, the ND4 to 2 and the ND8 to 3 stops, you could combine all three for 6 stops if you wanted just be aware than you can get instances of flare when combining filters.

As for where to buy them, I would have assumed locally places like Jessops would have stock of them, if not then online places like Warehouse Express.
 

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