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Firewire ??

S

Se7en1977

Guest
Hi All

I got my Sony HC44 camcorder yesterday, am so far pleased with it.

I want to start editing on the PC eventually, and was looking at Pinnacle Studio 10.

Anyone know what the advantage of getting a Firewire cable for the transfer compared to using the supplied USB is ?? Or where I can get one ??

Thanks
S
 

ush flynn

Prominent Member
firewire is the connection you need to get full resolution video to stream over to your pc. AFAIK the usb is for getting files off, wether they be mpeg video or stills. They dont usually allow the raw video to transfer over usb. And unless you have usb 2.0 on the camcorder then firewire is going to me much much faster anyway
 
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Se7en1977

Guest
ush flynn said:
firewire is the connection you need to get full resolution video to stream over to your pc.

That might explain why the resolution was so low when I was playing with it last night.

I've ordered a Firewire now, and downloaded the demo of Ulead Videostudio 10....Thanks for your help....
 

IAmATeaf

Established Member
Firewire is the only way to guarantee problem free transfers of video to a PC. The supplied USB cable can be used but you'll suffer from dropped frames and poor transfer quality. No idea why Sony don't supply a firewire cable as well as a USB lead TBH, suppose it must save then a few quid.
 

ush flynn

Prominent Member
also bear in mind that an hour of video from your camcorder will take up somewhere between 2 and 4 gig on your hard drive after transfer at max quality
 

felix2

Established Member
Just to clarify that an hour of DV-AVI, captured straight as it comes off the camcorder, takes about 13 GB per hour of video (including the audio). 1 hour of MPEG2 (compressed for DVD) would however only be between 2 to 4.7 GB.
 

ELV

Established Member
Iv'e just got a firewire after initially being dissapointed with the quality and thanks to the guys on here i got a firewire and the difference was immediate, theres still a slight drop in quality but by what i can gather this is due to the AVI to MPEG
conversion.Before it looked over compressed and the colours were naff, now it's spot on, slightly grainy but i thinks thats down to the poor light. I just need to figure out what the best value encoding software is. Am i right in thinking that the more passes the encoder does the better the quality? Also if i keep the size on the MPEG file to below 4.7 gig will the re be no loss in quality or is it envitable with the encoding. All in all very pleased though,the only problem i have is that the camcorder, dc19 (sony) i think has no av input to convert my old 8mm, but the brothjer in laws has so i'll lend his:thumbsup:
 

felix2

Established Member
Good to hear you're getting on well with the firewire, ELV! I assume you're capturing the video as full DV-AVI, then compressing it to MPEG2 when you want to make the DVD?

All MPEG encoders will in theory lose you quality (they squash your video file down to about 1/5 of its original size to fit on a 4.7 GB DVD). Better encoders will give better results, although how much better is partly a matter of opinion. And on what TV / screen you're playing it on! There was an interesting discussion on here a few weeks ago about different encoders, and the person originally asking the question decided they actually preferred the output from the built-in encoder on their video editing programme to the ones he tried on separate encoders!

General rule of thumb is you can fit 1 hour onto a DVD (at a data rate of about 8 Mbps), giving excellent quality, usually looks to most of us as good as the original. Anything up to 1.5 hours on a DVD (squashed down further to a lower rate of about 6 Mbps) should still be fine.

Once you get up towards 2 hours (4 to 5 Mbps), you'd be more likely to really see the differences between different (more expensive) encoders. If you're getting close to that, then it can be better to use the "Variable Bit Rate" - which means the encoder will use more data to encode the "difficult" bits, and save space by using less data to encode the "easy" bits. And yes, if you're doing that, it's definitely then best to use a 2-pass (or more!) encoding. That way, it analyses the video first before starting to encode, to give the best output possible. Hope that makes a bit of sense!
 

ELV

Established Member
Thanks for the reply mate, yes as far as i can tell it's DV-AVI, Nero,which im using gives me 2 options DV1 or Dv2, but when i look at the properties of the saved file it's stored as DV-AVI, and the disk space usage suggests this, I'm off on my hols to Salou tommorow for a fortnight so i'll be doing plenty of editing when i get back so no doubt i'll have more questions for you then,Nero i all honesty confuses me a bit on the editing but i just need to have a good play about before hand.

Thanks for the help , see you soon!:hiya:
 

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