Fire hoods for in ceiling speakers

sheenj

Standard Member
I can only imagine this question has been asked numerous times so apologies lol.

I plan to install in ceiling speakers in my newly built single story extension, but I'm unclear if I need a fire hood for building regulations?

I stay in Scotland if that's any help, any advice is much appreciated.

Thank you
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Thanks for that, I would presume as it's single level then ceiling doesn't need to act as a firewall, therefore it does not need a fire hood.
Thats very debatable, and some would agree with you. But if you have a read through that document, you'll see the other side of the discussion.

Plasterboard is not only used to make things aesthetically attractive, but also protect the timber structures. In the England & Wales Building regs, it says something like you can't alter something in a property, and leave it in a worse condition. So if you cut holes in plasterboard, you must either seal them back to the original condition, or in the case of downlighters have integral fire, vapour & sound protection.

Personally, I would try and find some suitable fire hoods. You may wish to ask your local building control for advice.
 

AmericanAudio

Active Member
AVForums Sponsor
Correct, in England fire hoods are technically only a legal requirement when there are habital rooms above.

However, we would always recommend fitting them in any situation as they prevent the rapid expansion of fire by preventing it getting into large open voids.

CAUTION - If this is for a Scotland Build i would ask your building warrant (?) Officer for confirmation as your regs are different in a number if areas.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Correct, in England fire hoods are only a legal requirement when there are habital rooms above.

However, we would always recommend fitting them in any situation as they prevent the rapid expansion of fire by preventing it getting into large open voids.

CAUTION - If this is for a Scotland Build i would ask your building warrant (?) Officer for confirmation as your regs are different in a number if areas.
The approved document in England & Wales, actually describes fire zones. A single dwelling is actually deemed to be one fire zone, excluding an integral garage. A property containing two separate dwellings (e.g. maisonettes), would be two fire zones, for example.

But then you do have the issue as described, when cutting holes in plasterboard.
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
Legal bit. aside, A company call National light sell. what they call HeatGuard and the have various sizes fire rated to 60min, Priced between £5.82 and £15, I think for that amount of money it would seem a no brainer.
 

AmericanAudio

Active Member
AVForums Sponsor
Its when you need acoustic fire hoods you get a jump in prices.
 

AmericanAudio

Active Member
AVForums Sponsor
Last edited:

AmericanAudio

Active Member
AVForums Sponsor
Agreed, a proper box will always be better.
 

Seriously Ltd

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
It is always advisable to install fire hoods above in ceiling speakers if the compartmentation is compromised regardless of there being a habitable room above or not.
If there is a habitable room above and or the cutouts will lead to fire spread to other parts of the building then this is a legal requirement. Approved Document B.

As mentioned a plasterboard back box properly sealed will be sufficient.
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sheenj

Standard Member
It is always advisable to install fire hoods above in ceiling speakers if the compartmentation is compromised regardless of there being a habitable room above or not.
If there is a habitable room above and or the cutouts will lead to fire spread to other parts of the building then this is a legal requirement. Approved Document B.

As mentioned a plasterboard back box properly sealed will be sufficient.
[email protected]
Cheers for the response bud 👍, ended up getting a pair of fire hoods
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
People keep saying its a legal requirement to install fire hoods etc in a domestic premises, used as a single family house; it is not a requirement (England & Wales), whether there's a habital room above or not.

A domestic premises, used as a single family house, is defined as one (fire) compartment. The requirements are different to that, as per say a block of flats. There is a requirement for fire resistances in domestic dwellings, but not across all instances. Personally I would use a form of fire resistance, the same as I would only install fire rated down lights etc.

Saying a fire hood is required (in all circumstances) for wall or ceiling speaker installed in a plasterboard wall or ceiling, then luminescent pads would be required for switches, sockets etc. There are also requirements for Approved Documents for the resistance to sound, vapour etc, which a typical smoke hood can not provide compliance with those documents.
 

Seriously Ltd

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
I understand what you are saying.

Compartmentation has to be maintained in a domestic dwelling. You can argue that a 2 storey single dwelling property is exempt but if fire spread is caused through said property due to the ceiling compartmentation failing from said speakers then questions will be raised.
3 floors and above inc loft conversions compartmentation is required to maintain 30 min fire separation. The MOE, means of escape, also has to be 30 min. Engineered solutions are also allowed subject to approval.

Any cables that we run in wall have to now be compliant with CPR regs as well as the way they are fixed along ceilings.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Agree, but to generalise isn’t the best opinion to give. Even the humble ceiling rose and cables, breaks the plasterboard barrier. You would not get a LBI asking you to fill the hole with intumescent filler.

On the other hand, they not allow to go rustic, and remove plasterboard ceilings to reveal structural joists.

What are CPR regs?
 

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