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Finding Crossover Point

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by Stone Free, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. Stone Free

    Stone Free
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    I have just received one of the new Radio Shack SPL meters and so I want to setup my computer speakers properly. The manual for the speakers is useless so I have no idea of their frequency response and so I have no idea where to set the crossover.

    I have set it by hand to remove the boomy bass sound of the Logitech Z5300 speakers.

    What is the best way to find out the speakers frequency response/crossover point?
     
  2. Reiner

    Reiner
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    The SPL meter is used to set the volume levels, not the cross-over point. Thus without some sophisticated test equipment (oscilloscope) you would need to trust the manufacturer's specifications or your ears.

    I would not except too much from computer speakers, the cross-over point is most likely 150Hz or greater ...
     
  3. Nimby

    Nimby
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    When you say you have to set the crossover point: Do you mean between woofers and tweeters in the speakers? Or between the subwoofer and satellite speakers?

    Download the stepped sinwaves tones from snapbug and save them onto your computer. If you save all your downloaded tones into an album you can play them automatically one after another. Just as if they were tracks on a music CD. This saves some time and keyboard tapping.

    Now play the tones through your speakers starting high and finishing low at some comfortable level on the meter (70dB?) You really ought to set up the SPL meter at the point where your head is where you normally sit at the computer. If you are dealing with surround speakers you might want to try tipping the microphone up towards the vertical. For a more even response from all directions.

    You must use a steady level (volume) from your computer throughout to ensure the tests mean anything.

    Have some squared paper to write down your meter readings as each new tone is played. If you write down the frequency of the tones on the left first. Then that will save some time as well. You can then repeat the tests with any changes you make to the speaker system or output level from the computer. Then you only need to add another column of meter readings beside your first test results.

    Don't try and blow up your subwoofer with high levels and very low frequencies just to be able to record something. If the subwoofer is rolling off then leave the volume level exactly where it is and just write down the dB levels from the meter as they fall through the floor.

    There are widely published SPL Meter bass correction figures on the internet. Your browser will find them using <radioshack SPL meter correction figures> Or just look in the FAQ on the SVS website. You just add these figures to your meter readings.

    Nimby
     
  4. Stone Free

    Stone Free
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    Between the subwoofer and satellite speakers.
     

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