FCP Editing: Timeline Footage Looks terrible in timeline & export its 4:3

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by mediasmoke, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. mediasmoke

    mediasmoke
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    Hello!
    Im having difficulty in final cut pro, My captured footage looks absolutely terrible on the timeline and when its exported it’s in 4:3 and looks squished, What is the BEST outcome I can setup with this footage, Im a tad naive when it comes to codec’s etc, I literally have two days to get this project completely done and im really struggling on what settings I need as my two source materials are different size’s codecs etc.
    I have two sources of captured footage that Im editing between. the first is in:
    DV - PAL, 720 × 576, 4:3, 25 fps, 28.80 Mbps - Audio: DV stereo, 32 kHz, 28.80 Mbps

    The second camera’s footage is in:
    .mov Apple Intermediate Codec, 960 × 540, 25 fps, 29.43 Mbps - Audio: 16-bit Big Endian stereo, 48 kHz, 1.54 Mbps

    The sequence settings are set to:
    720x576, CCIR 601 / DVPAL (5:4)
    Pixel aspect ratio: PAL - CCIR 601 (720 x 576)
    Field Dominance: Lower
    Anamorphic 16:9: off (Tried exporting with this on and off)
    Compressor: Apple ProRes 422 (Was defaulted to DV PAL)

    I use Final Cut Pro 6.06 on an Old Macbook running OSX 10.5.8
    I have my mac plugged into an external TV as a monitor at 1920 x 1080

    The footage is being used on a projector for an audience, Either as a DVD or File, It may be used on the web later.

    Here is a screen grab of the DV footage in the timeline in final cut pro and opened up the source footage in quicktime side by side.
    http://i.imgur.com/fs6D7.jpg
     
  2. 12harry

    12harry
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    Welcome, - and sorry I don't know your software, but a "squashed" picture reads like it's being forced into widescreen format (16:9). Unfortunately there are so many ways to play this, you need to ask (or wait for) someone that knows your software inside-out.

    Isn;t there a Forum for the users? That will have a FAQ section - but maybe you've tried that.
     
  3. doug_1986

    doug_1986
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    Hi there,

    I'm assuming this reply is a little too late, but just in case.

    So...

    Basically the first one is (technically) correct, while the second one is (technically) 'wrong'. So, what I would do if I were you is this. Make a new sequence and drop a clip from the first set of medi onto the empty timeline (nothing else). FCP will ask you if you want to match the sequence settings to match the clip. Hit yes. Delete the clip from the sequence. Now go to your old sequence, select all, copy, go to new sequence, paste. This way you know for sure that your sequence settings are correct.

    Good! Anamorphic should be on and the compressor should be DV-Pal (not prores).

    Go to 'RT' (just at the top left of the sequence window) and click 'Full'. Note that your computer might start to struggle. If it does, set it to dynamic and just ignore the fact that it dosen't look great!

    First up you need to export the timeline (you've already done this). It will look 4:3 in Quicktime (as you've pointed out). Just ignore this for now, that's fine. Next up open up compressor. Drop the .mov file into compressor and drop one of the PAL DVD settings onto it & hit submit. Compressor will then make an audio and a video file. Drop these into DVD studio pro and burn it off.

    For web (or just to have on your computer) personally I like to make an .h264 .mov file. Easiest way for this is simply to follow this tutorial from Vimeo...

    https://vimeo.com/24014623

    Bear in mind that when it comes to the frame size, go with either 1920x1080 or 1280x720 for HD, or 1024x576 for SD. So, for this, you want 1024x576. This will 'fix' your 4:3 problem thing (although not that it's actually a problem... I'll get to that!)

    Firstly, read this...

    http://www.avforums.com/forums/camc...-nly-few-days-either-keep-item-send-back.html

    In short, it's all about the 'shape' of the pixels. All PAL SD video (like yours) should always be 720x576, no matter whether it should be 4:3 or 16:9 (which is what you are seeing in Quicktime). Quicktime is simply displaying the encoded pixels, so is actually displaying it correctly. What Final Cut Pro etc does is to 'stretch' the video outwards to make it effectively the size of 1024x576 (aka 16:9). That's what all that CCIR 601 in your sequence settings is all about. Just ignore it and perform the compressions in Quicktime as above. Or, if you really want to make it look ok in Quicktime, then open it in Quicktime 7, hit cmd+J, select the video track and click 'presentation', then enter 1024x576 in the display boxes. It will now look normal, but you may have issues if you try to edit with it again.

    Hope that all makes sense, and hope you got it all sorted in time any how.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2012

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