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Faulty after 54 days. Repair or replacement??

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by pablo99, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. pablo99

    pablo99
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    My Toshiba 17" LCD I bought from JL less than 2 months ago packed in last night. No picture, only sound. On all inputs. X-box, Freeview, anything. There are no on-screen graphics nothing. It did this before and turning it off and on again fixed it.

    This time I have boxed it up and returned it to JL who insist I have to get it repaired. I demand a replacement. They say no.

    What options do I have? Do I have to accept a repair?

    Only 54 days old. I've had about 20 odd days use out of it and i'm very annoyed. :mad:
     
  2. caverncity

    caverncity
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    They said exactly the same to me on a Sony 32" tv.
    According to your stat rights if a product malfunctions within 6 months you are entitled to a repair. replacment or refund as the fault would have deemed to have been there from day one.

    Refunds
    You are entitled to your money back if there is a fault with the goods, or they are any of the following:

    Unsatisfactory quality
    Not fit for their purpose
    Misdescribed (not what they are supposed to be)
    You must be able to prove that the fault was present when the goods were sold. The burden of proof is on the consumer.

    Even if you have used the goods a few times, you are probably still entitled to a refund. However, if you have had some use from the goods, the trader may make a reduction from the original price when refunding the money.

    If you have not had a reasonable opportunity to check the goods, you could possibly be entitled to a refund if you complain at a later date.

    However, since the 31st March 2003, the Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations give you parallel or alternate rights. Instead of a refund, you may choose to ask for a replacement or a repair. Goods which do not conform to the contract within the six months after they were delivered are presumed to have been faulty when you got them. In these cases, you do not have to prove the fault was present when the goods were sold. Instead, the trader must prove that the fault was not present when the goods were sold. The burden of proof is on the trader.

    If a repair or replacement is not available or turns out to be unsuitable, you could then ask for a refund. Contact Consumer Direct for further advice.



    Electrical goods - your rights
    If you have bought electrical goods - such as toasters, washing machines, microwaves, stereos and televisions - they must be:

    Of satisfactory quality.
    Fit for their purpose.
    As described.
    When an item doesn’t meet some or all of these conditions:
    If you have only used them a few times or haven’t had a reasonable opportunity to check them, you are probably entitled to a refund for a fault or poor description, or alternatively you may request a replacement.

    If the fault is only minor and can easily be put right, it is reasonable to accept a repair. This won’t stop you claiming a replacement or refund if the repair turns out to be unsatisfactory.

    If you have used them more than a few times or have had a reasonable opportunity to check them, you are probably still entitled to a repair or replacement. A repair should be carried out within a reasonable period of time and without causing you significant inconvenience. Any repair should restore goods to a satisfactory condition. If this does not happen, you are entitled to a replacement or compensation. This could be a sum of money or the cost of hiring a temporary replacement, or perhaps the loan of a replacement.

    If the goods cannot be replaced or repaired economically, you are entitled to a refund. The trader may make a reduction from the price you paid to allow for the use you have had from the goods.

    If the goods have damaged anything else or you are out of pocket in any other way, you may be entitled to compensation over and above the price of the goods.

    Remember, if you are entitled to a refund, replacement, repair or compensation, it is the trader who must sort out your problem. The trader cannot tell you to go back to the manufacturer.
     
  3. justdoit

    justdoit
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    I am intrigued to know what trading standards view is towards dead or stuck pixels on LCD’s that were present from day 1. Surely it constitutes as a fault and therefore should be rejectable as not being as described e.g. 800 X 600 as 1 pixel is missing or spoiling the viewing experience owing to a dot/s being clearly viewable at most times. Manufacturers may claim to support the ISO 13406-2 agreement but why should buyers have to put up with it when 1 customer with a perfect screen pays the same price as another who has to live with annoying dots over the screen.
     

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