fake phonetic alphabet

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by damage, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. damage

    damage
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    was on the phone today reading out aserial number and struggling to think of the official nato words to use to represent the letters
    its funny how when you are struggling to think of the correct word you have no problem thinking of offensive one to replace it
    "s for... s for sh..., s fo ship"

    it reminded me of a psuedo alphabet i once heard

    it started "a for a horse" and had other amusing ones like "i for an eye"
    maybe "e for a donkey" and "t for two"

    i tried googling a few of these to get a complete list (though i imagine a copmlete list would get quiet lame towarsd the end), but had no luck whatsoever

    does anyone know some of these
     
  2. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    There are loads of "fake" ones , some only being relevant to the vernacular of specific fields.
    I'll drop in : "O for a night on the town".
    Possibly nobody has collated them all on a website - could be your chance to become an internet celebrity if you do this.
    Before the NATO "Alfa, Bravo, Charlie" series there was an "Able, Baker, Canada" one.
    I have no trouble remembering them all because of 10 years in the Royal Signals and nearly 40 years as a radio amateur.
    In similar vein the resistor colour code has more than one memory-jogging sentence.
    "Bye bye Rosie, off you go, Bristol via Great Western"

    or

    Bl*ck b**stards rape our young girls but virgins grow wiser.

    (although I translate the colours automatically these days due to much practice).

    Chris Muriel, Manchester
     
  3. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    If you want the most common real phonetic alphabet, it is:

    Alpha
    Bravo
    Charlie
    Delta
    Echo
    Foxtrot
    Golf
    Hotel
    India
    Juliet
    Kilo
    Lima
    Mike
    November
    Oscar
    Papa
    Quebec
    Romeo
    Sierra
    Tango
    Uniform
    Victor
    Whisky
    X-Ray
    Yankee
    Zulu

    Numbers are "Zero" for 0 (not "nought" or "oh") and "niner" for 9 - otherwise what you'd expect.
     
  4. stealther

    stealther
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    In my last job I used to support Boots The Chemist IT equipment. I was speaking to a sweet old lady called Barbara. (everyone who works for boots is called Barbara, Margaret or Anne) Anyway I asked her to give me her Log on ID the third letter was M, I asked her “Is that N for November?” she said “No its M for masturbate! Err sorry love don’t know quite why I said that.” She was so embarrassed I fell of my chair laughing:rotfl: and had to get a colleague to continue the call I just could not stop laughing. The things some of the staff used to come out with instead of using the phonetic alphabet were hilarious:)
     
  5. damage

    damage
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    actually found a list in schotts miscellany

    a for orses
    b for mutton
    c for miles
    d for dentures
    e for ning standard
    f for vessence
    g for police
    h for consent
    i for vovello
    j for oranges
    k for teria
    l for leather
    m for sis
    n for lope
    o for the wings of a dove
    p for ning seals
    q for snooker
    r for mo
    s for midable
    t for two
    u for mizzam
    v for la france
    w for quits
    x for breakfast
    y for mistress
    z for breezes

    if anyone wants to explain z and d or who "arthur mo" is
    and is s supposed to be "its"
     
  6. Steve N

    Steve N
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    I worked with an old guy a long time ago.
    If anyone said "ay" (meaning pardon) he used to answer:-
    A for orses, B for lamb. (Meaning:- Hay for horses, beef or lamb)
    Used to drive us all mad.
     
  7. Steve N

    Steve N
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    Z could be zepher, which is a breeze. Or it could mean sea breeze.
    R for mo probably means half a mo(moment) which means hang on a sec.
     
  8. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    Hay for horses, beef, or mutton.

    Edit: On second thoughts, that makes far more sense if it's two separate things rather than one:

    Hay for horses.

    Beef or mutton?

    See for miles. (Edit: or "sea for miles"?)

    Teeth or dentures, I guess.

    Evening Standard (local newspaper in London).

    Effervescence (meaning "fizzing").

    Chief of police.

    Age for consent. (That doesn't really work. "Age of consent"? Hmm.)

    I think that should be "I for novello" - there was a moderately famous composer of popular songs in the first half of the 20th century named Ivor Novello.

    Jaffa oranges.

    Cafeteria.

    "Hell for leather" meaning "very fast".

    Emphasis.

    Envelope.

    Psalm 55.

    Possibly that should be "p for ming seals" i.e. "performing seals" which you might see at the circus balancing balls on their noses.

    One plays snooker with a cue.

    "Half a mo", meaning "half a moment" or "hang on a minute".

    I get the "formidable" part, but why "s"? "He's formidable", possibly?

    Tea for two, and two for tea (a song).

    Euphemism.

    Vive la France!

    Trying to be "double or quits" but doesn't quite work. "Double you or quits", "double you for quits" - not quite right.

    Eggs for breakfast.

    Wife or mistress?

    In american "z" is pronounced "zee" rather than "zed", so "zephyr breezes", presumably.

    Edit: Or possibly "sea for breezes".
     
  9. FruitBat

    FruitBat
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    I remember doing this years ago, we had a few different ones...
     

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