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Question EXTERIOR CAT6 CABLES

Drongo

Distinguished Member
Hi

I’m looking to upgrade my home network which currently consists of devices being connected either by Home Plugs or Wi-Fi.

I would like to install CAT 6 (or whatever is the latest) cable around my house. However as we have decorated throughout; my wife would go banana’s if I started having new cables chased in. A forthcoming TV upgrade consisting a satellite dish installation and satellite cables run around the exterior of the house gives me the opportunity to also run CAT on the exterior of the house.

I’d like some suggestions as to the best cable to use and where to get it from.

Also; is CAT6 available as a ’shot gun’ cable (two separate runs of cable attached together) as satellite cable is? This would useful in running two lengths of cable to each location.

My main criteria are quality and reliability. I’m concerned that the cable should be weatherproof and UV resistant. I also like to be sure that when the cable has to undergo a right angle turn (i.e. from the exterior surface to the interior) that none of the interior strands of the cable fracture.

The icing on the cake would be getting brown cable to match the brickwork and knowing the diameter of the cable; so I can have the cable clips ready for the work to start.

Any suggestions and advice very gratefully received.

Cheers.

PS. I'm a dunce when it comes to this stuff - please keep your answers simple and jargon free! :D
 

Drongo

Distinguished Member
Posted over a week ago and over a hundred views and not one reply. :(

Surely someone can offer me some advice about exterior CAT 6 cables?

If not; does anyone know where I might get the help I need?

Cheers.
 

danielf

Novice Member
With the cable make sure it is Copper and not CCA. I normally use Excel cable as they are good value but not the cheap rubbish stuff. You can get the cable from here Excel External Cable. With anything like this talk to the people you are buying from as normally they know what they are talking about and will give discounts when ordering a full system.
 

Drongo

Distinguished Member
With the cable make sure it is Copper and not CCA. I normally use Excel cable as they are good value but not the cheap rubbish stuff. You can get the cable from here Excel External Cable. With anything like this talk to the people you are buying from as normally they know what they are talking about and will give discounts when ordering a full system.

Cheers :thumbsup:

I'll contact them and ask their advice - many thanks.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
...I also like to be sure that when the cable has to undergo a right angle turn (i.e. from the exterior surface to the interior) that none of the interior strands of the cable fracture...

Usually bulk cable is single core, so there's only one "strand" to break, and once done so, it's ruined - or at least you stand no chance of it being "cat6" if it works at all. However, also to be cat"X" you shouldn't be bending UTP through 90 degree turns - they should be "curved" (like a pipe) in a bend at no less than (IMS) 4 times the diameter of the sheathing (which is still pretty tight) but you shouldn't put a right angle (or any other shape) kink in the cable.

If you want to scare yourself silly about how stringent the requirements are for cat6, have a read of the following link...

Installation Pitfalls in Cat6 Cabling | Automated Home

There's much more to it than simply buying buying cat6 cable. Personally, especially if the use case was ethernet, I'd save myself the hassle and use cat5e. It's easier to work with, possibly a bit cheaper and hard to get so wrong that ethernet doesn't work.
 
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Drongo

Distinguished Member
Usually bulk cable is single core, so there's only one "strand" to break, and once done so, it's ruined - or at least you stand no chance of it being "cat6" if it works at all. However, also to be cat"X" you shouldn't be bending UTP through 90 degree turns - they should be "curved" (like a pipe) in a bend at no less than (IMS) 4 times the diameter of the sheathing (which is still pretty tight) but you shouldn't put a right angle (or any other shape) kink in the cable.

If you want to scare yourself silly about how stringent the requirements are for cat6, have a read of the following link...

Installation Pitfalls in Cat6 Cabling | Automated Home

There's much more to it than simply buying buying cat6 cable. Personally, especially if the use case was ethernet, I'd save myself the hassle and use cat5e. It's easier to work with, possibly a bit cheaper and hard to get so wrong that ethernet doesn't work.

Hi

Thanks for that detailed and very helpful reply.

I had assumed that the copper strands in CAT6 would be multistrand and not single strand. Are you saying that I have made the wrong assumption and that all CAT6 cable is single strand or that some CAT 6 is single strand?

The reason that I'm looking at CAT 6 is to try and future proof this install as much as I can. Currently my network is a combination of Homeplug and Wi-Fi and it is a bit flakey from time to time. I would like something a bit more robust. I suspect that if I were ever to try to stream UHD/4K material it wouldn't work.

My dwelling is a maisonette. I occupy the top two floors of a coverted Victorian property and am reasonably high up. I will be having some scaffolding erected to do another job. This gives me the opportunity to get the CAT 6 installed. It won't be easy to simply replace a run of cable if it fails at any point in the future. Nor will it be easy to 'upgrade' the cable at a later date if it proves to be not up to job; that's why I would like to do it once and get it right; but getting it as future proofed as possible.

Your post poses me a dilemma.

Do I use CAT5 with less likelyhood of error on installation but less bandwidth for future use; or CAT6 which will be more prone to installation error but more scope for more demanding use in future?

Hmmm; what to do? :confused:
 

Kristian

Well-known Member
A quick addition to this thread:

Cat6 as both stranded cable (think patch leads) and solid core (think runouts). Same for Cat5/5E.
Cat6 standards allow for 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet to 100m and 10Gb to 35/55m (depending how it's installed. Cat5E will do 10/100/1000Mb Ethernet to 100m. The difference is your 'future proofing'.
General view is that Cat6 solid > Cat5E for HDMI over Catx converters.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Following in my favorite site for matters UTP - it says everything I could, so there's little value me repeating it. Have a read and if you have further questions, post back.

How to wire Ethernet Cables

Basically the difference between single (solid) core and stranded (AKA "patch") is nothing to do with the "cat" - it's more about the construction and application. "Solid" core cat 5/5e/6/6a/7/whatever tends to be deployed in "fixed" infrastructure that is installed once and never "moves" whereas "stranded" is used for patch cords and desk drops that may get "moved" in their life time. It's like the difference between the "twin and earth" mains cabled plastered into your walls versus the "stranded" "kettle leads" which move lot. Both are rated to "X" but they differ in application (and cost) and in the case of UTP, need difference terminations (plugs/sockets.)
 

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