Explaining Full Frame ?

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by monkeyleader, Sep 15, 2007.

  1. monkeyleader

    monkeyleader
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    Howdy (again),

    Not that I'm in the market for a new body (just yet) but I'm always been interested in an explanation regarding "Full Frame" in the likes of the 1d, 5d etc and what in means in terms of supportable lens. Is there an easy way to tell which lens supports full frame / not full frame and are there any that support both? An important decision when coming to an upgrade.

    Nige

    (not that I'm tempted by the 40d or anything :devil:)
     
  2. Member 79251

    Member 79251
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    I belive its this full frame = 35mm. That means you get the full picture.
     
  3. T0MAT01

    T0MAT01
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    Yep full frame means the camera has the same size sensor as 35mm film.

    As for lenses, all Canon EF lenses will work with full frame (or 35mm film) whereas the EF-s lenses are made specifically for the 1.6x crop cameras and will not work on a full frame body.

    As for Sigma lenses I think they have the letters DC if they are only suitable for crop cameras, otherwise they should be alright too.

    HTH.
     
  4. jamesbryan17

    jamesbryan17
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    The best lenses for the full frame cameras are the Canon L series. This is because the full sized sensor will intensify the bad quality of a lens, so you want the best optics possible.
     
  5. DaveyD-UK

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    as jamesbryan17 said a full frame sensor will intensify bad optics of a lens. This is because a full sensor goes more to the edge of the lens circle where distortion becomes worse due to increased refraction.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. senu

    senu
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    Oh yeah..? Its not that good then?:rotfl:
     
  7. Member 79251

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    So if distortion becomes worse due to increased refraction why used full frame. :confused:
     
  8. senu

    senu
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    I guess with full frame , from the same viewpoint you get a lot more image and can get much better low light/high ISO noise since the photosites can be much bigger on a larger sized sensor and not require any noise producing "amplification" to make them more light sensitive
    The downside is that they are more expensive to make and demand better optics
    The fact too is that the crop sensors have proved capable of delivering excellent results from inexpensive lenses , cost less to make and much improved low light ( high ISO) reduced noise
    For any no of reasons Nikon had not made one till now perhaps confident that they could compete with Canons FF cameras on IQ
     

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