Ethernet sockets instead of WiFi?

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by image165, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. image165

    image165
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    Hello there. Is it possible to get Ethernet wall sockets installed in your home? I've tried WiFi, but even with a Netgear Rangemax DG834PN I get very short coverage, with a "Poor" unreliable signal in most rooms.

    What companies offer Ethernet wall socket installation? Is this something that BT can come in and do?

    If anyone has done this, or can offer any advise, I'd appreciate it.
     
  2. solutus

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  3. stevelup

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    Most electrical contractors will be capable of doing this, otherwise it's a pretty trivial DIY job.

    Surprised you are having problems with WiFi though... Might be worth trying a Linksys gateway and make sure you are using quality kit on the receiving end too.

    It doesn't matter how good your gateway is if the clients are crap...
     
  4. image165

    image165
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    Yeah, for the WiFi I'm using a Netgear Rangemax DG834PN as the router, and a Netgear Rangemax WPN511 card in a laptop. The WiFi works fine when the laptop is in clear site of the router. But once walls, patio doors, and freezers get in the way, the signal becomes poor.

    I'd actually like to get a really long telephone extension cable, so I could try moving the router into different parts of the house. But I don't really know where to get teh cable.

    As for the Ethernet, could it be wired externally around the outside of the house? This would actually be neater than running it through the house, through all the door frames.
     
  5. stevelup

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    There's no reason why you can't run it around the outside.

    I'd look out for some black stuff though as the usual grey/white stuff will probably look a bit nasty...

    If you want to just temporarily try your router in different locations in the house, why not just pick up a cheap telephone extension cable? You can probably get a 20M one for less than a fiver.

    Unless you live in a mansion, you shouldn't be having the problems you are describing - it does suggest to me that something is not happy. Can you borrow another WIFI card / router to do some experimentation with?

    Steve
     
  6. mcsdan

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    Have you tried different positions for the router? I found it best to place up high so is ontop of a bookcase.

    Worth a try.
     
  7. MarkSS

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  8. arfster

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    Wifi signal totally depends on the structure and materials of the house. Some places can't get a signal anywhere, others have vast ranges.

    Personally, I find I can get a signal up on the roof (3 floors up!), but not through a single wall. The building dates from 1802, and every wall is minimum two feet of solid stone. However, floors/ceilings are standard wooden beams, and the wifi signal goes through that like it's not there.
     
  9. Arfa

    Arfa
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    Its pretty straight forward to wire up your house with ethernet. I got most of my gear from Maplin: 100m roll of cat5e cable was about £25, wall sockets were about £5-10 ish, then you need the rj45 plugs (£2 for a bag of 10 ish) to crimp onto the ends of cables and of course the crimping tool (£15). I have a 3 bed terrace house, I needed about 150m of cable (after mishaps). 5 sockets downstairs and 8 upstairs.

    I put a big switch/hub in the attic, then ran every socket to there. The hardest part was burying the cable in the walls and plastering smooth over the top. Of course you could just run the cables in plastic covering on top of the plaster, just depends how neat you want stuff.

    When wiring up the sockets, there's a couple of different standards for wire order. Doesn't matter which you use, just so long as the plug you crimp on is consisant with the plug you're wiring it to.

    Other tips are: try to not put any nasty kinks in the cable and don't pull cable through holes too fast, friction burn can melt the plastic insulation on the inside. And always hide a few extra metres of cable before cuttings, never know when it could be useful... :)

    I preferred wired ethernet, due to its extra speed and security. Makes more sense for any desktops, media centres, consoles, printers, etc that you don't move around much. Its only arkward if you have a laptop you tend to use all over the place, but then putting sockets everywhere helps. Of course there's nothing stopping you use both, by adding a wireless access point to your wire network, to bridge betwee the wired network and the wireless one.
     
  10. ActualWinners

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    Depending on your specific requirements (bandwidth, no of nodes etc), I would echo the thoughts of MarkSS. I've been using the Microlink dLan plugs for quite a while in conjunction with my WLAN and I have been more than happy. These "homeplug" type units are simple to install and potentially cheaper and more flexible than having to cable the whole house!

    As an alternative, try http://linitx.com/product_info.php?cPath=130&products_id=928 - these provide 85mbps and are a good price too!

    Cheers, Paul
     
  11. NikosF

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    I'm looking to install something similar to what Arfa did. Can anyone suggest a contractor that can come in an install ethernet wiring. I don't have the time or skills for a DIY job - my walls are solid (concrete?).

    Any suggestions for West London (Fulham) to do a 3-bed 3-storey terraced house?

    Thanks
     
  12. MikeTV

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    I think another option may be to get a second wifi router - which you can use as a kind of repeater in other areas of the house. I've not tried this myself, and others may know more about this approach...
     
  13. jidh007

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    Yeah, you can get range extenders, iirc they're not too expensive, and would probably be easier and cheaper than getting a contractor to ethernet up your house.
     
  14. image165

    image165
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    Well, I'd prefer the WiFi option over wired Ethernet, if WiFi actually did what it says on the box.

    Yes, I want to temporarily try my WiFi router in different locations. Currently it is in the corner of the house, on the ground floor. I'd like to try it in the centre of the house, high up near the ceiling.

    Only thing is, I can't use a telephone extension cable, as I have an ADSL wall plate (2 sockets: 1 adsl, 1 voice). So I need an ADSL extension cable, to go directly from the wall socket, into my WiFi router.

    I live in a very average 1930s 3-bedroom house. Like I said, the WiFi only gives a "Very Good" connection in a straight line, with no walls in the way. Perhaps the walls of older houses are too thick/solid for WiFi?
     
  15. The Dude

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    You should certainly get better wifi performance than that, regardless of what your house is made from.. As a quick test, set your router to use Wifi Channel 1 and see if that makes any difference at all. :)


    ( Any building historians looking in? what could be different about the materials used in pre-war houses?
    I don't know what they were using at the time, but there's something in a LOT of 1930's housing that really screws with Wifi networking.... )


    The new ''rangemax' mimo routers are good, but you'll nearly always be better off with a standard DG834G and an add-on 8-15db antenna, which would have cost you less anyway. (Not much help to you now, I know) :mad:

    mimo is up there with 'superG' on my list of things that the world could do without.
     
  16. jidh007

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    Yeah, MIMO seems to sacrifice a stable distance for signal strength. You should see if you can get a B or G network without any 108mbps crap to test before you ethernet things up as well.
     
  17. stratagem

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    First, I'll make it clear we are a retailler of certain products to overcome these situations, I hope I'm OK to do so as we do advertise on this site.

    The problem is simply the density of materials used, bricks, concrete, stone etc are very dense, breezeblocks are not, for wireless to work it needs to be able to steer through the less dense areas (doorways), in this respect wireless travels much like a person, it will bounce around until it finds a doorway, then do the same until the next dooway etc.

    Also if you are trying to carry a video stream you need QoS, most wirelesses do not have this, (our's do). More on this if you wish..

    Another alternative is powerline to wireless adaptors, plug in a powerline adaptor to the router, then elswhere in the house plug in a wireless to powerline adaptor and you have a brand new hotspot in the room without cabling.

    http://www.broadbandcarrier.net
     

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