Ethernet socket wiring help

nick48million

Novice Member
Ethernet socket wiring help
Hi,
Ever since I've lived in my current house we have had these ethernet sockets we've never used. Recently I did a bit of investigating. As I have ethernet already in my office, I plugged it in to see if it worked. Sadly it didn't, there was no signal at all in the next room.
I have attached a picture of each side of the wirings the sockets, and I was wondering if it's something to do with each end's wiring (as I noticed they are different) and if I'd need to rewire them; or it was something to do with the cable and if each wirings are correct.
Hope you can help :D
Note: I don't think this really matters, but I plugged in a Cat 6 cable and the cable that comes out of the sockets is CAT5e.
(Excuse the state of the sockets, you can tell they haven't been opened in a while...)
IMG_20210512_163405632.jpg
IMG_20210122_193724126.jpg
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I'll link my favourite "DIY" page on UTP below.

With ethernet, the cable runs are all wired "straight" - pin 1 to pin1, pin2 to pin2, etc.

BUT: Not all ethernet sockets have their pin outs in the same order as each other, (on the back side - the pins on the front will be identical,) so if you've got sockets from (say) two different manufacturers, they might be punched down (superficially) differently, but what matters is that the wires are landing on the "correct" pins according to the scheme pertinent to the particular socket.

There's also two wiring schemes used, called "A" and "B." Many sockets have colour schemes that accommodate both. Again, you need to ensure it's consistent both ends - either both wired for "A" or both wired for "B" - if it's "A" one end and "B" the other you'll have lobe with a "crossed" pair of cables. It's a bit difficult to be sure form the pictures, but they look OK to me - looks like they are both wired for "B."


What equipment are you using to test (cat of the patchcords doesn't matter.)
 
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neilball

Well-known Member
I’d suggest investing in a basic cheap cable tester that will at least prove one way or the other if you have the cable correctly connected at both sides (assuming it is just a cable straight through the wall and the sockets are not actually wired back to a central area somewhere else). Once you have that confirmed then you can then move on to checking patch cables and network switch ports etc.
 
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jimscreechy

Active Member
One look at those pictures tells me that they are not correctly wired.

Can I safely assume that you have actually connected the other end of the cables to your router or switch wherever that may be?? You've not actually said and I'll take nothing for granted... at any rate, you will need to get those rewired, or do them yourself.

Also when done correctly both ends will have the same pin configuration connection (though given they aren't actually the same type of faceplate they may not "appear" the same), connectively they will be)
 
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AndyC_772

Active Member
Just for reference, in case you don't already know, the pins used for Ethernet are paired as follows:
1-2
3-6
4-5
7-8

The cabing in the wall should be wired 1-for-1, though almost all equipment will cope with the wires within each pair being swapped. Some equipment will also work if the pairs themselves are switched around (eg. 1-2 swapped with 3-6).
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
I guess something else worth contemplating is are you sure both ends of the cable are the same cable lobe and there's not some other's hidden away somewhere.

Professionals would use a test device to put a "tone" on the line then check using "wand" that squeaks when you touch it to the line under test - however, buying/hiring such a tester is probably going to be a bit expensive for a one off check. A cheaper version would be to use the sort of tester NeilBall advocates, they are only ten pounds (GBP) or so and you can always punt it on afterwards. If you put such such a tester on the line and no lights illuminate, then it infers either the cable is severed somewhere or the two endpoint are not the same cable lobe.
 
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andy1249

Distinguished Member
Going by the numbers printed on the sockets in the photos and the colors of the wires, both look to be wired to T568B , however what is very strange is that the numbered positions are very different in both sockets , which seems weird to me.
Any sockets Ive ever wired up had the numbered positions in exactly the same layout , so maybe one of those sockets is printed up incorrectly and as a result its been wired up incorrectly.

The only way to test it for sure is with a meter.
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
Before you go off on wild goose chases a couple of questions.

1. Did you have those sockets installed ?
2. If you did / did not are there any other network sockets in the house?

The reason I ask is I regularly see this where people think two sockets are connected together, only to find out that they are not connected at all and terminate to other sockets, IDCs / Patch panels elsewhere, like in the back of a cupboard or a loft.

The easiest way to test if they are even the same cable is to use a cable-toner on the cable and listen on the other end. They are not expensive and its what we use to trace cables. This one also has a simple network tester built-in

Amazon product
 
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oneman

Well-known Member
I was going to ask the same thing, are you 100% sure those two sockets are connected ?

A cheap cable tester will at least show that a pin from one sockets has continuity to a pin in the other sockets. I rarely see a complete failure of a cable unless somebody has cut the cable, drilled through it or something.
 
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nick48million

Novice Member
I'll link my favourite "DIY" page on UTP below.

With ethernet, the cable runs are all wired "straight" - pin 1 to pin1, pin2 to pin2, etc.

BUT: Not all ethernet sockets have their pin outs in the same order as each other, (on the back side - the pins on the front will be identical,) so if you've got sockets from (say) two different manufacturers, they might be punched down (superficially) differently, but what matters is that the wires are landing on the "correct" pins according to the scheme pertinent to the particular socket.

There's also two wiring schemes used, called "A" and "B." Many sockets have colour schemes that accommodate both. Again, you need to ensure it's consistent both ends - either both wired for "A" or both wired for "B" - if it's "A" one end and "B" the other you'll have lobe with a "crossed" pair of cables. It's a bit difficult to be sure form the pictures, but they look OK to me - looks like they are both wired for "B."


What equipment are you using to test (cat of the patchcords doesn't matter.)
I’d suggest investing in a basic cheap cable tester that will at least prove one way or the other if you have the cable correctly connected at both sides (assuming it is just a cable straight through the wall and the sockets are not actually wired back to a central area somewhere else). Once you have that confirmed then you can then move on to checking patch cables and network switch ports etc.
One look at those pictures tells me that they are not correctly wired.

Can I safely assume that you have actually connected the other end of the cables to your router or switch wherever that may be?? You've not actually said and I'll take nothing for granted... at any rate, you will need to get those rewired, or do them yourself.

Also when done correctly both ends will have the same pin configuration connection (though given they aren't actually the same type of faceplate they may not "appear" the same), connectively they will be)
Just for reference, in case you don't already know, the pins used for Ethernet are paired as follows:
1-2
3-6
4-5
7-8

The cabing in the wall should be wired 1-for-1, though almost all equipment will cope with the wires within each pair being swapped. Some equipment will also work if the pairs themselves are switched around (eg. 1-2 swapped with 3-6).
I guess something else worth contemplating is are you sure both ends of the cable are the same cable lobe and there's not some other's hidden away somewhere.

Professionals would use a test device to put a "tone" on the line then check using "wand" that squeaks when you touch it to the line under test - however, buying/hiring such a tester is probably going to be a bit expensive for a one off check. A cheaper version would be to use the sort of tester NeilBall advocates, they are only ten pounds (GBP) or so and you can always punt it on afterwards. If you put such such a tester on the line and no lights illuminate, then it infers either the cable is severed somewhere or the two endpoint are not the same cable lobe.
Going by the numbers printed on the sockets in the photos and the colors of the wires, both look to be wired to T568B , however what is very strange is that the numbered positions are very different in both sockets , which seems weird to me.
Any sockets Ive ever wired up had the numbered positions in exactly the same layout , so maybe one of those sockets is printed up incorrectly and as a result its been wired up incorrectly.

The only way to test it for sure is with a meter.
Before you go off on wild goose chases a couple of questions.

1. Did you have those sockets installed ?
2. If you did / did not are there any other network sockets in the house?

The reason I ask is I regularly see this where people think two sockets are connected together, only to find out that they are not connected at all and terminate to other sockets, IDCs / Patch panels elsewhere, like in the back of a cupboard or a loft.

The easiest way to test if they are even the same cable is to use a cable-toner on the cable and listen on the other end. They are not expensive and its what we use to trace cables. This one also has a simple network tester built-in

Amazon product
I was going to ask the same thing, are you 100% sure those two sockets are connected ?

A cheap cable tester will at least show that a pin from one sockets has continuity to a pin in the other sockets. I rarely see a complete failure of a cable unless somebody has cut the cable, drilled through it or something.
Thanks to everyone for their response to this.
From the many replies I have gathered this (correct me if I'm wrong):
  • There are no other network sockets in my house, and they've been here since we moved in, so by process of elimination they surely must be connected, which I guess will be confirmed by my next point.
  • I need to purchase a networking cable tester to make sure 1) the wire is functional and is worth the effort, 2) the sockets are wired correctly.
  • If the cables are working, then a rewire will be required (which is nervewracking as if I get it wrong there's not much slack in the cable) in which I'll probably buy two new sockets to make sure they're from the same manufacturer, and I so I can confirm they are wired the same.

Does that sound about right?
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
It's risky to "just assume" things - to know for sure we need to check. Some of us have been round the block a few times of being assured that "these are definitely the only sockets," but when we check, we find they aren't, or they simply aren't connected because the wires have been chopped somewhere.

You can do a basic test with a light bulb and a battery, (or a multi-meter,) but for the amount a basic cable tester costs (about 10 GBP which depending on your value system is a couple of pints, two KFC's, or a bottle of wine,) you might as well get hold of one of them and save yourself the ball ache of making up loopback plugs and so on. It'll also give you a starting point for figuring out any wiremap issues, though the really cheap ones miss things like split and crossed pairs.

Don't start de-wiring any sockets until you've done the basic checks - you could literally be wasting your time and/or making things worse.
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
Any sockets Ive ever wired up had the numbered positions in exactly the same layout , so maybe one of those sockets is printed up incorrectly and as a result its been wired up incorrectly.
That would be really rare - I've never seen any mis-labling in about 25 years of dong this. But I've certainly seen sockets and patch panels with different layout of the pins on the IDC blocks. Personally I prefer the ones (such as those pictured by the OP) where then "numbers" are in the "wrong" order, but each pairs then lands together - it save a lot of untwisting to fiddle about getting the green/blue pairs on the right pins (and of course, higher cats are more stringent about the amount if untwisting permitted - ideally as little as possible.)
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
Gotta agree with @mickevh - the number of times a home owner ‘definitely knows’ that there are no other sockets and cables, only to find the hidden sockets and cables elsewhere. You cannot assume with unknown network cabling, you have to test and prove.
 
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this is the type of "bare minimum" tester you should look for:
Amazon product
It will tell you if you have end-to-end connectivity (or not), and if any wires are straight through, flipped, or not connected.

It will not tell you anything about interference or "Cat" grade, and could miss flaky connections, but it can definitely be "good enough" for your needs.

Edit - I don't know how I missed the one Mushii posted a few posts up, but get that one if possible. The tone generator can help locate the proper jack when you are unsure which port goes where, among other things.
 
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andy1249

Distinguished Member
Personally I prefer the ones (such as those pictured by the OP) where then "numbers" are in the "wrong" order, but each pairs then lands together
Yup, those would be the only ones Ive ever seen , probably because those would be the only ones the Network administrators approve for use within the Company / FAB.

Im not a network expert by any means , but do have to get my hands dirty sometimes with new equipment installs etc.
 
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Bolosun

Active Member
From the picture the blue and brown pairs are the wrong way around. The blue in the top picture are opposite the orange and in the bottom they are opposite the green
 
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neilball

Well-known Member
From the picture the blue and brown pairs are the wrong way around. The blue in the top picture are opposite the orange and in the bottom they are opposite the green

There’s nothing I can see that suggests this - as other have said, the connections on the rear punch down block are not a universal standard order, so you have to follow the colour indicators either on the lunch down block or their documentation although it’s rare to see unmarked blocks these days.

What could be an issue is that one of the modules does not state of the colours shown are for TIA568A or TIA568B wiring schemes, so the orange and blue pairs might not be matched. Hence the need for a cable tester.

We also don’t know for sure that these two modules are actually connected to each other - as other posters have suggested it is easy to make incorrect assumptions when you are working on someone else’s installation. The OP cannot be sure that is the case until the cabling is tested.

I’m sure many installers here were taught (like me) to treat anything untested as faulty/broken, and that no ethernet cabling should be a brought into use until testing proves 100% correct operation.
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
From the picture the blue and brown pairs are the wrong way around. The blue in the top picture are opposite the orange and in the bottom they are opposite the green
I disagree, they are correctly wired and the wiring sequence is correct for that Euro module. T568B


8Brown 6 Green
7Brown / White 3Green / White
4 Blue 2Orange
5Blue / White 1Orange / White

The colours are all in the correct sequence
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
Both of those sockets are T568B as pin 6 is Green (on both sockets) on T568B whereas it would be Orange on T656A

1620984762438.png



1620984789236.png
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
I like many other here spend a lot of time fault finding on network cabling, this is bread and butter stuff and knowing the wiring sequences between T568A and B is a day one basic. The sequence that IDC connections are physically ordered in, in the rear of the socket is irrelevant. What is relevant is that the cables are in the correct Number marked by the IDC connections for either A or B. In this case B has been used in both sockets.

It would be reasonable to assume, at this point of the investigation that wiring sequences are correct. Therefore 1 of 3 things are likely:

1. Those sockets are not connected, they never were and they connect to somewhere else, as yet undiscovered
2. Those sockets were once connected and somehow the cables have become broken
3. The sockets are connected and working fine and are working and the OP has made an error in testing them.
 
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Trajet

Active Member
My starting point would be to look for the other ends of the cables. I would look near to where the master phone socket is as that is most likely to be where the router would be. If possible, check under the floor as, in my view, that's where they would have been hidden.
 
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Bolosun

Active Member
If you look at both diagrams, the cables are 1 for 1, eg straight through as the cross connecting is done in the fly leads. In your original picture they are not straight through. I have wired mine up in my house as straight through, so both sockets are wired identical and everything works. Also the colours are irrelevant as long as they are wired the same at both ends.
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
If you look at both diagrams, the cables are 1 for 1, eg straight through as the cross connecting is done in the fly leads. In your original picture they are not straight through. I have wired mine up in my house as straight through, so both sockets are wired identical and everything works. Also the colours are irrelevant as long as they are wired the same at both ends.

To repeat; the colours on the back side of an IDC socket do NOT have to match up and there's no "standard" layout: Different manufacturers lay them out differently; what matters to achieve a straight through pin out is that one follows the scheme for the applicable socket design. Take another look at the OP's images and note that all the wires are landing on the appropriate colours on the socket. The first image illustrates this nicely; look at the pin numbers - 1 2 3 6 (not 1 2 3 4) which corresponds to W/O O W/G G as used in the TIA "B" pin out. I'll bet that the blue pair is (correctly) landing on an obscured 4 5 and we can see that the brown pair is (correctly) landing on 7 8. The second image is a bit harder to interpret because we can only see pins 4 6 (B G) but I'll be very surprised if that socket is not laid out (reading counter clockwise) 1 2 3 6 4 5 8 7, but it's not possible to see for sure.

For ethernet usage the patch ("fly") leads are also "straight" - you have to go out of your way to buy or make crossed patchcords and they are rarely required.

For ethernet, any crossing is done in the equipment (usually the hubs/switches) not the cabling. The cabling is expected to be "straight" everywhere. Gigabit ethernet requires straight cabling (in decent switches, if a crossed link is detected the switches will "uncross" it, otherwise not work and/or fall back to 10/100.) 10/100 ethernet needs crossing, but it's done in the switch ports. Astute readers will observe that this means any 10/100 switch-to-switch links will be "crossed" in both switches and thus yield a "straight" link which won't work for 10/100. In "olden" days switches/hubs used to have specially designated "uplink" ports that didn't cross, or some ports had a toggle switches so we could cross/uncross the ports as desired. Subsequently something called "auto-MDI/MDI-X" was invented that automatically determines whether any crossing/uncrossing is required and sorts it out for us without us having to do anything special or make up crossed patchcords.
 
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Deleted member 24354

Guest
Also the colours are irrelevant as long as they are wired the same at both ends.
The colours are VERY relevant. The two wiring STANDARDS provide specific wire colours to each pin.

I feel that your misunderstanding here is
that not all manufacturers put their IDCs in the same sequence, but they will connect to the pins in the correct number / colour sequence within the socket itself.

Please, if you do not understand this, stop providing advice that is fundamentally wrong. You are creating confusion and developing problems for anyone in the future, who may have to deal with this wiring.

For your information there at least 3 if not 4 networking professionals providing advice in this thread. They are providing advice based on documented international Standards and thousands if not tens of thousands of hours of experience.
 
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neilball

Well-known Member
Just to confirm what Mushii has said, one of the fundamental mistakes that inexperienced people make when terminating Cat cables is to simply assume that providing the connections match pin for pin at both ends is all that is needed. This ignores the primary part of the standard, which is to carry signals on each of the four twisted pairs inside the cable (ie the solid colour and matching white/coloured stripe), so that the signals are given an amount of interference suppression and to prevent cross-talk (amongst a number of other properties). That is where the TIA568 standards come in and why it is vital to follow these for correct operation.

Working in any other order breaks this signal integrity and also introduces the risk of split-pairs - where the signal is carried on wires from two separate pairs, which seriously degrade the performance of the cable to the point it often does not work at all even though a basic cable tester will show pin to pin continuity.
 
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