1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Entry level test equipment

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by PAULFESS, May 9, 2005.

  1. PAULFESS

    PAULFESS
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    What type of HW is necessary to test room acoustics, beyond test mike, mike pre amp and testing SW
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    7,529
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Near London.
    Ratings:
    +208
    At it's most basic level you just need an SPL meter, although it's worth remembering that this is very labour intensive.

    The next step up would be as you describe really consisting of a computer and software capable of audio RTA along with a suitable microphone and accompanying hardware. Something like ETF would enable you to analyse room acoustics and distortion levels. A software signal generator should be included with such software but if not you'll need one of those too. Naturally this can only be done in one position at a time.

    Beyond that I suppose the next step up is a few microphones combined with a multiplexer so you can take results from a number of points in the room. Hopefully Piers, Gordon or some of the other more knowledgable industry bods will be able to explain where I've gone wrong and what you should be doing! :)
     
  3. Piers

    Piers
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,971
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Shropshire
    Ratings:
    +227
    You haven't gone wrong at all - spot on!

    The original question was what hardware is need to test room acoustics and I think the answer is "that depends on what you want to test". A simple SPL meter will allow you to set the output levels of a multi-speaker system so that at the listening position each speaker is delivering the same level, though with a cheap and cheerful meter it may not be accurate!

    The Sencore SP295 that I use does a whole lot more, and combined with a multiplexer, 4 microphones and some good software on the laptop allows analysis of how the room is influencing the sound as heard at the listening positions. There are many even more expensive options - what are you trying to achieve?
     

Share This Page

Loading...