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End of DVD-RAM support

Faust

Well-known Member
I have around 50 DVD-Ram discs which I once made great use of.

I have to confess I can't remember the last time I used one. Would others agree that given the cost and capacity of HDD these days the demise of DVD-RAM was inevitable?

These discs were in their way the portable HDD of their day. I did get one out when I purchased my ET60 TV a few months ago, simply to see how they looked on a modern 47" TV.

I have to say I was shocked by how poor the PQ was of what I had recorded a few years back. I always used to use SP mode and whilst it looked fine on my old CRT the same cannot be said when viewed on today's LED TV's.

When I think how much the discs cost me and the fact they are now more or less defunct is enough to make me weep. However, if my current non use of them is anything to go by then can we blame Panasonic for phasing this format out?
 

Gavtech

Administrator
Have Panasonic made an official announcement of this? There is still RAM support on their recording machines - just not playback machines.

RAM still confer an advantage ( as 'portable HDD') that HDD's cannot, in this use-context, given that HDD's are deliberately crippled and made unable to connect elsewhere.

Also the picture quality is not a limitation of the media... more a limitation of the broadcast and compression systems in use at the time of their zenith.... albeit they are limited to SD , apart from camera sourced AVCHD.
They are just a digital storage medium so are still capable of storing 'modern' good quality video delivered by a greater bandwidth broadcast system and using more modern compressors and encoders.
(viz. HD material delivered via HD compressed to SD. -given that the mandatory SD compression today is of a technically higher standard than SD that existed in the heyday of RAM)


I do not necessarily agree that their demise is / was inevitable for the reasons you state.
All media types have a lifespan. It is probably possible to name literally hundreds of extinct media formats from the past 30 years alone. One day HDD's will be extinct.

The continual drift is toward high definition TV which is probably the most limiting factor on the continued use of RAM.
Which is a shame. I regard it as best removable media format that has been devised ... in terms of actual use and flexibility.
A great tool for bouncing material, compiling and manipulating material, all losslessly.
 
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Faust

Well-known Member
Have Panasonic made an official announcement of this? There is still RAM support on their recording machines - just not playback machines.

RAM still confer an advantage ( as 'portable HDD') that HDD's cannot in this use context given that HDD's are deliberately crippled and made unable to connect elsewhere.

Also the picture quality is not a limitation of the media... more a limitation of the broadcast and compression systems in use at the time of their zenith.... albeit they are limited to SD , apart from camera sourced AVCHD.
They are just a digital storage medium so are still capable of storing 'modern' good quality video delivered by a greater bandwidth broadcast system and using more modern compressors and encoders.
(viz. HD material delivered via HD compressed to SD. -given that the mandatory SD compression today is of a technically higher standard than SD that existed in the heyday of RAM)


I do not necessarily agree that their demise is / was inevitable for the reasons you state.
All media types have a lifespan. It is probably possible to name literally hundreds of extinct media formats from the past 30 years alone. One day HDD's will be extinct.

The continual drift is toward high definition TV which is probably the most limiting factor on the continued use of RAM.
Which is a shame. I regard it as best removable media format that has been devised ... in terms of actual use and flexibility.
A great tool for bouncing material, compiling and manipulating material, all losslessly.

I wouldn't disagree with what you say at all. It is a great piece of mobile media, although size limiting in today's ever increasing file sizes. At it's height I was using them every single night of the week to record one programme or another. They kept me fit and on my toes leaping off the sofa to replace a full disc just in time to start recording the next upcoming programme.

Given the absence of support on the latest playback machines I suspect it's only a matter of time before the option disappears on the recording side, as much to do with file sizes and convenience as anything else.

They cost a tenner a time when first released too, which was pretty expensive, though they were reckoned to be able to do thousands of records and wipes before deterioration. I've never had a failure with any.

My last computer had a RAM compatible disc drive but I suspect those are as rare as hens teeth these days.
 

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