Quantcast

Electric cars

Dancook

Distinguished Member
I didn't start this in motoring because it's quite a broad subject and you don't need to be interested in cars to have an opinion on it.

Recently I've been considering a new car, originally I thought Audi A1 (hybrid) - my partner likes the Renault Zoe. It's unlikely we will be buying either any time soon though!

I looked at the Zoe, and saw the 100 mile distance already looking like a pain when we visit family 110 miles away. We're going to probably need the government to roll on electrical charging stations in a big way too.

How does everyone else feel about electric cars, will you get one when certain conditions are met?
 
Last edited:

Grangey.

Well-known Member
This advert always made me laugh


"you've always switched so much to electric, why not your car?"

Where do I start?

-Its a dead technology before it gets of the ground, batteries will need to be replaced something like every 10 years at an expodential cost and is not environmentally friendly to dispose of

-Lack of charging points around the UK

-Charging takes a lifetime, no good at all as an every day commuter

-All the current ranges of cars are too busy trying to look all futuristic than actually being simplistic and appealing (Hybrids not as much)

Its a crock as far as im concerned.

If more work is done on Hydrogen cars than I think theyre the future, Electric will just turn into another "LPG" phase imo
 

Berties

Banned
If I had a driving license I wouldn't bother with electric car, cost of the car then time for recharging. And electricity isn't cheap, I have to wonder how it compares to efficient diesel car?

Rather wait until hydrogen fuel cell becomes affordable
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
-Charging takes a lifetime, no good at all as an every day commuter
I've read this

Renault ZOE Preview's battery can be charged in one of three ways: standard charge (between 6 and 8 hours depending on the available electric power), quick charge (37 miles range in less than 10 minutes or 80% battery capacity in 30 minutes) or "quickdrop" (a 3-minute battery exchange).
The quick charges don't sound so bad!

I remember reading the Tesla Roadster's battery lasted six years and cost £6000 to replace!! Not sure about the newer 'affordable' cars coming up.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member

Berties

Banned
The quick charges don't sound so bad!
Those charge times can't be everytime though, if you do a quick charge everytime your cells will have a short life. I remember Fifth Gear had a north/south trip, taken in a electric car. Took 6 days, compared to 8 hours in a regular car.

Electric is only worthwhile for local shopping trip, 2 miles either way so when you get home it doesn't take too long to top back up.
 

mjcairney

Well-known Member
I have to say that, unless and until someone develops a battery that can offer a range around 300 miles and a re-charge time of a few minutes at most (both extremely unlikely, if not impossible), then I cannot see battery powered cars ever coming to the mass market.

As it is, best offer around 100 miles range and eight hours to fully re-charge. It will be possible to charge in half that time, but the battery life will also be halved and, as I believe battery replacement will cost around £7K, I can't see many people opting to go down that route.

Cheers,

Martin.
 
Last edited:

Dancook

Distinguished Member
Those charge times can't be everytime though, if you do a quick charge everytime your cells will have a short life. I remember Fifth Gear had a north/south trip, taken in a electric car. Took 6 days, compared to 8 hours in a regular car.

Electric is only worthwhile for local shopping trip, 2 miles either way so when you get home it doesn't take too long to top back up.
What about a 25 mile round trip commute every day? I could easily do that in an electric and charge it over night.

Obviously some people are on the road too much for it be possible - perhaps having multiple batteries helps here - I don't know.
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Berties said:
Those charge times can't be everytime though, if you do a quick charge everytime your cells will have a short life. I remember Fifth Gear had a north/south trip, taken in a electric car. Took 6 days, compared to 8 hours in a regular car.

Electric is only worthwhile for local shopping trip, 2 miles either way so when you get home it doesn't take too long to top back up.
As much as I like TG they play silly comparison games like that too often...
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
I have to say that, unless and until someone develops a battery that can offer a range around 300 miles and a re-charge time of a few minutes at most (both extremely unlikely, if not impossible), then I cannot see battery powered cars ever coming to the mass market.
Tesla do a 85KWH battery that they quote does 300 miles (at 55mph), but I don't expect recharge times anything like minutes :)

You can get a high power home charger that will do

CHARGING RATE OF 56 MILES RANGE PER HOUR AT MAX POWER
Tesla aren't cheap though :)
 

Berties

Banned
What if you do alternative shift? Late one night, early the next? That means battery won't be fully charged.

perhaps having multiple batteries helps here
Not possible they weigh 1 tonne, and buying a second set is out of the question, so unless you have another £10,000 spare to buy a second set and a pallet truck (plus time to reconnect up) Not possible.
 

Berties

Banned
As much as I like TG they play silly comparison games like that too often...
My point is many people do round trips, ie mate went up to Scotland, came back down. Back in the office, said need you in Devon tonight.

How could you do that in an electric car?
 

ldoodle

Well-known Member
Surley the gov will find a way to cream back any lost revenue from the reduction of petrol use?
Not them, but the oil companies as well!

I saw a conspiracy theory programme a while ago and on it was electric cars. Apparantly someone came up with serious plans in the 50s but the oil companies caught wind and bought off his plans.

We will not see electric cars as the norm until all the world's oil has dried up. The oil companies have too much power to just stand by and let anyone effectively render them surplus.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
What if you do alternative shift? Late one night, early the next? That means battery won't be fully charged.

Not possible they weigh 1 tonne, and buying a second set is out of the question, so unless you have another £10,000 spare to buy a second set and a pallet truck (plus time to reconnect up) Not possible.
Personally I don't do shift work - and even if I did I would be fine with a quick charge for the distance I travel.

We are debating pro's and con's - I understand it won't be for every body - and it's good to hear why it doesn't work for some people.

The quick swap must be something else then - a service where they swap your battery.. which means what? perhaps you don't own your battery :)
 

Adcook

Well-known Member
per mile an electric car is cheaper but over the average ownership period of say three years Id say there wouldnt be much between an electric and a small economical petrol or deisel. The high purchase price and depreciation of electric cars would be the reason. That is also assuming a daily drive into the London congestion charge zone other wise the normal car would come out on top.

Electric motor driven vehicles I beleive are the furture but batteries for storage (alone at least) arent. I think a combo of hydrogen fuel cell and battery that can be charged using off peak electriciy are the way it should be heading. The cost of the fuel cell is not the issue (the price of these will fall with bulk manufacturing) its the safe (and to a lesser extent economical) storage and delivery of hydrogen both on forecourts and in vehicles that is the issue
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
My point is many people do round trips, ie mate went up to Scotland, came back down. Back in the office, said need you in Devon tonight.

How could you do that in an electric car?
Obviously you don't then, this person won't find an electric car suitable for their needs - so they won't buy one.
 

Grangey.

Well-known Member
What about a 25 mile round trip commute every day?
this is half the point though.

Are you really going to buy this car and ONLY use it for work?

What happens when you want to go drive to a mates in the evening, or go to your local supermarket?

Oh theres a really cheap showing of the latest blockbuster in the cinema tonight its only £1- oh wait we cant go because your cars left charging?

Im sure if you really thought about it that 8 hour charge time would drastically limit your life and usage of the car and doesnt that sort of defy the point of having ac ar- the associated freedom it provides?
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
this is half the point though.

Are you really going to buy this car and ONLY use it for work?

What happens when you want to go drive to a mates in the evening, or go to your local supermarket?

Oh theres a really cheap showing of the latest blockbuster in the cinema tonight its only £1- oh wait we cant go because your cars left charging?

Im sure if you really thought about it that 8 hour charge time would drastically limit your life and usage of the car and doesnt that sort of defy the point of having ac ar- the associated freedom it provides?
Well if I were to do an 8 hour charge time, I could do it midnight - 8am.

If that gave me 100 mile charge, that would be plenty to go to work and back and extra-curricular activities. Supermarket is 2 miles away.

The zoe does 37miles on a 30 minute charge if needed.

So yes there are limits - but it's not as bad as you make out.

However - I wouldn't want a car capable of only 100 miles on a max charge :)
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Berties said:
My point is many people do round trips, ie mate went up to Scotland, came back down. Back in the office, said need you in Devon tonight.

How could you do that in an electric car?
That's not what they are for though is it ...
 

Berties

Banned
per mile an electric car is cheaper but over the average ownership period of say three years Id say there wouldnt be much between an electric and a small economical petrol or deisel. The high purchase price and depreciation of electric cars would be the reason. That is also assuming a daily drive into the London congestion charge zone other wise the normal car would come out on top.

Electric motor driven vehicles I beleive are the furture but batteries for storage (alone at least) arent. I think a combo of hydrogen fuel cell and battery that can be charged using off peak electriciy are the way it should be heading. The cost of the fuel cell is not the issue (the price of these will fall with bulk manufacturing) its the safe (and to a lesser extent economical) storage and delivery of hydrogen both on forecourts and in vehicles that is the issue
If everyone charges their batteries up at night, then I can see the end of the cheaper night tariff.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
That means you have to have two cars. :rolleyes:
Why do you think you have to have 2 cars?

People who choose electric cars will know whether it fits in with their life style. They may choose to get the train for long journeys and use the electric car for 99% of their other stuff.

People who know they will need a car for long journey's will not buy an electric car - they will continue to use a petrol/diesel.
 

Berties

Banned
Why do you think you have to have 2 cars?
Because someone might need to do a longer trip even though they bought the electric car because they work locally, shop locally.. but might need to do 100 miles trip way with a 2 hour break.

So you'll need to rent a car, or f you're going with public transport why do you have a car? And they're not cheap nor convenient.
 

p9ul

Well-known Member
If you have solar panels on your roof for home use, can it also be used to charge the car up?
 

Adcook

Well-known Member
If everyone charges their batteries up at night, then I can see the end of the cheaper night tariff.
True but aleast the useage would be relatively constant and easy to predict, part of why electricity is more costly during the day is because the national grid has to maintain a sufficiently high generation level to cover a complicated and often difficult to predict consumption level therefore often there is a fair bit of waste which we all have to pay for. Maybe the price differential wouldnt be as remarkable but I think it will still be there.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
Because someone might need to do a longer trip even though they bought the electric car because they work locally, shop locally.. but might need to do 100 miles trip way with a 2 hour break.

So you'll need to rent a car, or f you're going with public transport why do you have a car? And they're not cheap nor convenient.
In the last few years the only times an electric car would not have been suitable is that bi-monthly visit to family.

Unless I can overcome this, I know an electric car would not be suitable for me.

I'm sure many people know if an electric car is a suitable purchase for their lifestyle.

If this long distance trip was imposed on you by the company you work for - then you'd be aware of this possibility and know how it might be solved. Company car, car hired by company? Some people I work with don't even drive, if they were asked to go on a long distance trip - then it's the same thing, they can't.
 

Berties

Banned
Some people I work with don't even drive, if they were asked to go on a long distance trip - then it's the same thing, they can't.
Then they wouldn't be employed. Many places do not supply company car (just pay milage) so if you had a electric car I can see them starting moaning at you when they need you to go up north..
 

Similar threads

Trending threads

Latest News

Philips OLED burn-in solution is 95 percent effective
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Philips TV’s with HDMI 2.1 and Dolby Vision IQ due in time
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Sonos clarifies product update and recycling position
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Philips 4th Gen P5 processor adds AI for more realistic images
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
LG regards HDR10+ as unnecessary
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom