Edit on PC

niccam

Standard Member
Hi have read some of your threads but could someone pleasea answer these questions Thank you
1 want to capture svhs to pc what do I need ?
2 P2,P3,P4 or AMD ?
3 want to do some fancy tranisions what size of HD and speed ?
4 does copying to DVD help in anyway before sending to PC ?
5 output from PC would need to be either DVD or SVHS ?
6 Windows XP ?
7 would PC dvd writer help for finish output ?
8 resonable priced edit progam ?

sorry for all the questions but I want to change to PC editing I know a little bit but the questions above would help in knowing what costs will incure and I could make a start in changing my equipment. Thank you niccam
 
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Brian110507

Guest
1. Assuming you have something to play the s-vhs tape you can capture analogue direct with an analogue capture card, or you can convert to DV using a camcorder with AV/S-video in and capture by firewire, have a look here http://www.simplydv.co.uk/Background/analog_conv.html.

2. YES, have a read of this http://www.simplydv.co.uk/simplyBB/viewtopic.php?t=2364

3. Bigger and faster the better - consider 120Gb as minimum

4. NO.

5. YES

6. would be best

7. Definitely

8. FREE Moviemaker2 if you have Windows XP, have a look at http://www.papajohn.org for what it can do
 

[email protected]

Well-known Member
Originally posted by niccam
3 want to do some fancy tranisions what size of HD and speed ?
Trust me you don't.

Nothing adds that amateur touch to a video more than fancy transitions.

But just in case, as fast a CPU as you can afford, loads of HDD space and look into Windows MovieMaker 2 that's free for Windows XP.

Use that until you outgrow it and then spend money on something else but it will help you through the learning curve and is actually very good.
 

MarkE19

Moderator
1.If you don't mind fairly low quality then a cheaper option than the DV bridge is:

www.dabs.com
Dazzle DVC 80
£45.82 inc VAT
quicklinx 2THGWS

But some users have been unsatisfied with the results.

2. If buying a new PC then get the fastest CPU you can afford. Either P$ or AMD will work with video editing.

3. Capturing video will take 1Gb of disk space for every 4 minutes captured. A 1 hour tape will therefore take approx 15Gb. On top of this you will need a lot more for editing and file conversion etc. I would recommend double the amount needed for capture. With disks being so cheap you might as well go for a 120GB drive that should cost under £80.

4. If copied to a DVD before getting onto the PC you will no longer need an analogue capture device so will save some money there, but DVD files are highly compressed so you will loose quality and have possible problems with editing.

5. If sending to friends or family that don't have a DVD player then (S)VHS is ok, but your best bet will be DVD.

6. Windows XP is the most stable version, so less likely to crash during rendering &/or capture. Most editing software & hardware will work well with it. IMO you would be best with XP.

7. Almost certainly! You could do without a DVD writer in the PC if you have a standalone DVD writer with a DV-in port (many don't) and would then be able to copy via DV from PC to recorder. A PC DVD writer will make life simpler though. The other option would be to copy from PC to a camcorder with DV-in and then connect to external writer.

8. As already mentioned the free Movie Maker that comes with XP is very good as long as you get the free upgrade to MM2 from MS. Other popular progs are Pinnacle Studio 8 (I believe Studio 9 is soon to be released) or Ulead also do editing software.

So costs will vary vastly depending on wheather you have a good enough PC or not. A P3 running Windows 98se or later is all that is needed, but faster will save a lot of time. Also a lot of RAM will help.

Mark.
 
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Billwill

Guest
2) Any currently available AMD or intel CPU meets minimum capture standards- but faster chips get some rendering and processing done faster

3) I'd say the overuse of fancy transitions and effects can spoil projects- but there is certainly a place for them.
I'd recommend an EIDE 133 ATA hard disk over 80gb as the secondary disk that grabs the footage- let your hard disk that runs windows be smaller if you like, but separate to this.

4) and 7) No - not putting footage into the computer, but outputting to DVD helps you share your work with friends, family or whoever wants to see the finished project in the 2nd best way compared to outputting it to MiniDV. It would look great on most TV's, much better than VHS.

5) Lots of PC editing these days tends to be with firewire in and out with digital camcorders, although my capture card, a Pinnacle Pro One, has analogue in and outs also.

8) Firewire cards often come with good edit programs. Pinnacle Studio 8 is a good one and there are others. Most people I know use Adobe premiere, which is great, but takes some learning, and it costs hundreds of £'s if you can't find someone to sell you a slightly older version.
 

MarkE19

Moderator
Adobe premiere, which is great, but takes some learning,
Ain't that the truth! About as easy to use for a noob as a Rubics Cube for a blind man :D

and it costs hundreds of £'s if you can't find someone to sell you a slightly older version.
It's very often cheaper to buy a capture card with Premiere bundled with it than to buy the prog on its own - unless you do know someone who is selling a copy off s/h.

Mark.
 

niccam

Standard Member
Thanks everybody for answering, couple more ideas
1 TV capture card with both in and outs connections [svhs] any good?
2 Don`t need output if copying to DVD writer, like the idea off DVD-RAM as I have Panasonic E2O writer
3 When rendering is that the finish movie or just fancy transitions being rendering.
4 I won`t be capturing a lot of footage approx 10mins at a
time, edit with some fancy wipes and effects along with stills will that cut down the spec I need ?

Again sorry for all the questions but learning all the time
 
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Billwill

Guest
1) can't answer quality of output via that.
2) that's correct
3) usually effects like brightness or colours processing, and transitions- which are replaced avi files it makes then slots in on cue- are rendered meaning manufactured
4) I was doing these things on my pentium 200mmx pc with 32mb ram! I advise you to get the fastest pc you can afford- but not the gold standard fastest- as that will be masively more costly.

I use an AMD XP2800+ Barton pc with 512mb of DDR 2700 ram. Primary hard disk is 60gb 7200rpm and secondary- the capture disk- is an 80gb 7200rpm maxtor disk. BUT you don't need anywhere near this power for video editing- slower CPU means slower rendering- but it will do the job.
 
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Brian110507

Guest
1) Yes a TV capture card with video in and out is always a useful option to have, but you do seem a bit hung up on SVHS, - this is only any good if you have a TV and a VCR which can accept SVHS and it's no good sending friends and family who haven't got a DVD player an SVHS video tape because they won't be able to view that either unless they also have an SVHS (or simulated SVHS replay) video player.

I find the best way of making VHS (and if I needed SVHS) tapes is to send the video back to your camera as full DV and then play the camera direct to the VCR.
 

niccam

Standard Member
Yes I am hung up on svhs because my camcorder is full size svhs . I don`t have any DV equipment at the moment.
I would use the svhs as master and then copy to dvd or vhs.
Going back to the transitions and if I use only stills and say the finish project is approx 4mins long would this cut down the spec I need and forget about video side of it. Would a Photo edit program better for what I need like a slideshow and is there any good programs out there with a good range of transitions/wipes
Thanks again for your answers as I am begining to see what I really need and that I will save myself a few pounds by your answers. Thanks
 
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Brian110507

Guest
Well yes if your not actually doing video then that would cut down the PC performance required but almost any PC manufactured in the last 5 years or so will be able to do what you want and if you are thinking of a new PC then even the most basic will be more than adequate. MovieMaker 2 is still a good option for you but if you want to look at another programm go to www.ulead.co.uk and download a free trial version of Ulead Video Studio 7 this has several transistions included and more are available when you pay for the full version.

if you only want to do stills to CD/DVD then there are such programmes, one of these is "Magix pictures on CD and DVD" but there are several others around, search the net for some free ones.
 

niccam

Standard Member
Thanks Beejaycee I now know what I`m doing I am doing still`s and then producing a slideshow need to know a couple things
1 when saving a still with my tv capture card I have 3 options on the size I want to save. if I save a small size and use them will it when burned to dvd be small on the TV screen or will it be the full screen size?
2 when burning to dvd ram does the program have to be dvd ram or because it is burning to dvd it does not matter?
3 when capturing stills would it be better AVI or JPEG
know doubt there will be more questions but I`m getting there
Thanks again everyone
 
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Brian110507

Guest
1) I always capture my pictures or use from my camera at the largest size possible and let UVS7 fit to screen this seems to give best quality. you do have options for sizing when you load a still image image at left hand side under "resampling option"

2) not sure I understand the question ? when your project is finished click the 'Share' tab at top then on the left choose 'Create a disc' and follow the prompts etc to burn direct to DVD

3) I always use .jpg for stills, didn't think you could capture stills as .avi if you can might be better.
 

niccam

Standard Member
Thanks again for answering.
On Q2 I meant when you burn to dvd does it matter if your dvd writer can burn to ram. In other words I want to burn to dvd ram is there any problems with that option
Q3 Sorry all mixed up I use an AVI capture card and have 2 options BMP or JPEG Which one is best for burning to ram
Yours niccam
 
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Brian110507

Guest
If you want a DVD to play on your DVD player or in your computer as a video you just select 'create disc' and then DVD and UVS7 burns a DVD for that purpose. Are you saying you want to burn a DVD-RAM for archiving purposes ?? I haven't found a way to do that in UVS7, but it does allow you to put the full quality video back to a blank tape in your DV-in enabled camcorder. If you want to put your videos on DVD-RAM you can just use your normal burning procedure and drag and drop files using 'my computer' or whatever software you normally use.

I always use .jpeg at maximum resolution direct from my 4Mp digital camera.
 

niccam

Standard Member
Hi again, another question on DVD RAM if I record stills on dvd ram on my stand alone recorder is there any way that I can capture them to the PC bearing that there is a dvd ram drive on the PC. Is there any software needed . Thank you niccam
 
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Brian110507

Guest
Whats the format (file extension) of the files you are putting on your DVD-RAM ??
 

niccam

Standard Member
This what I am planing to do if possible
Record svhs stills on to dvd ram using my Panasonic E20
Then put it into the PC dvd ram and capture from the stills[ I`m saying stills but I know that it is just a still photo recorded ]hoping that this will be another way of putting stills into the PC .
At the moment I can capture via TV card
 
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Brian110507

Guest
What you want to do *should* be possible but I can't offer software suggestions as I don't know the format of the files you have on your DVD-RAM.
 

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