Ed Miliband was the wrong choice

Discussion in 'Politics & The Economy' started by guest5234, Nov 27, 2010.

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  1. guest5234

    guest5234
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    As a life long Labour voter up to the last election I have to say he is just does not cut it, he is useless at the dispatch box and Cameron makes him look like forest gump, he was the worst choice Labour could have possibly have made, Dianne Abbot would have been a better choice....honestly. :oops:
     
  2. domtheone

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    As someone who will never vote Labour again he wasn't a bad choice as he should keep Labour away from Power:devil:

    Only that smug, unelectable git Balls could have been better:D
     
  3. Wild Weasel

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    As much as I think Mr Ed is an adenoidal dimwit, Abbot would have been insufferably worse.

    Alan Johnson was their best bet. Sadly he declined to stand.
     
  4. pandemic

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    He's not as bad as I'd originally thought, I think he's done okay at the PMQs. Picking up on a number of things, early on. Having said that it hasn't been that long since he's been in and in that time both himself and Cameron have taken time out (paternity leave).
    Also the according to the YouGov polls the share of votes is equal between the Tories and Labour, but in terms of seats puts Labour only 1 seat short of a majority.
     
  5. Confucius

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    Anything that keeps labour out of power is good for Great Britain.
     
  6. Rasczak

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    I have to agree - the wrong choice by far and fundamentally undermined by his waffer thin election victory. Hopefully they will ditch him a year or so before the next election which, if the Lib Dem party continues to collapse, is a very winnable prospect for them.
     
  7. bosque

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    In many ways it doesn't matter what Ed does or says at the moment because if the election is in five years time no one will remember these first few months - or even years. But he has a problem in that he doesn't look or sound authoritative and he must **** off Labour MPs every time he appears in public because hardly any of them voted for him. If the new kid at work is going to be your boss he has to show he's quite good at what he does, if he's as crap at his job as you, you are going to get restless.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  8. guest5234

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    Taking the maximum time off when his wife had their child was a poor show, loads of people just cannot take that time off in the real world even if they are allowed to.
     
  9. la gran siete

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    to my mind he lacks charisma and presence plus that dreadful nasal voice of his is bound to put some people off. Apart from that i think he is doing ok at the dispatch box
     
  10. Desmo

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    When ever I hear him debating and he "scores a point" he sounds like an excited school boy, all grins and smiles that he just said something clever. I'm awalys expecting his next line to be "...and my dads bigger than your dad".
     
  11. Miyazaki

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    The Unions chose him though didn't they? Not the labour party.
     
  12. guest5234

    guest5234
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    Correct.
     
  13. Ed Selley

    Ed Selley
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    I thought This piece was interesting. I don't agree with all of it but I feel it points to the wider issue that both Millibands are by origin, policy wonks. They have nothing in common with their core vote and in Ed's case, I watch him and wonder how much he has in common with the rest of Earth.
     
  14. lostinspace

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    That's a very big if, though.
    I can't see this parliament going the distance, and Labour has to be ready if they want to get back in, whatever the timing.

    If the cuts work quickly and without too much pain (not a chance of that IMO), then Labour will be stuffed whoever is their figurehead.

    But when the pain really starts, as it surely will, I think the Liberals could jump ship crying enough is enough, and they must save the country from this devilish Conservative party, and Labour must be ready for whenever that happens.
     
  15. dazza74

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    We've had the real pain already imo, what happened to the private sector between 2007-2009. That's what I don't think people like you, wrapped up in your public sector bubble seem to grasp. I don't think you'll see a great deal of job losses in the public sector personally, I've had the fire brigade and the council round 3 times in the space of a year to inspect my property. They've no real reason for tuning up yesterday for the third visit, but hell why not create yourself some work, make yourself look busy :smashin:

    They saved 6 jobs at my local council by getting rid of the lease cars for 10% of the employees. The public sector will never suffer the same ravages that the private sector does, they just have to tinker with their budget.
     
  16. guest5234

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    God he was useless at PM question time today, sounds like a lost squeaky child.
     
  17. dazza74

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    Given your extreme right wing tendancies why have you spent most of your life voting for a party that doesn't basically support your views?
     
  18. krish

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    I don't understand the concept of being a lifelong voter of one party
    - I actually think it's incredibly stupid and comparable to being a lifelong Tesco shopper, or loyal to one bank, or always renewing with one insurer at their inflated quote

    btw I'm just applying this view to deliberately voting for the same party out of loyalty, and not to voting for the same party because at each election they appeal the most.
     
  19. lostinspace

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    Warning:this post is completely off topic!

    What a load of b******s.

    I am not in a "public sector bubble". I do currently work there, but only on a fixed term contract, so knew I would be going in Feb 2011 along with many thousands of others brought in to set up schemes to help get people back into work- mainly as a result of the corruption within the private banking sector. The fact that this government has decided to cancel all those schemes and set up their own is a policy decision beyond my department's control.

    Previously I have been made redundant twice in the last 6 years from the private sector, where I worked all my life until joining DWP.

    As for believing we've had the pain already............what gives you that idea? Where I work, and in most central government offices, the redundancies do not kick in until next year.

    I sincerely hope that councils, for example, can reduce the number of redundancies necessary by changing how they spend their reduced budget. But for many thousands in different kinds of public work, that is not an option.
     
  20. swall101

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    Incorrect... union members, ordinary working people chose him, it was not a union block vote.
     
  21. dazza74

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    80% of the population work in the private sector, yet it's headline news on a daily basis whenever the other 20% that work in the public sector face job losses.

    All I'm trying to say is we need to get a sense of perspective with these things, sure if you lose your job in the public sector you'll be upset in the coming years, no more upset though than those that lost their jobs in the downturn in the private sector. I fail to see how that as you so eloquantly decided to put it is hollyhocks.
     
  22. Ed Selley

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    Quite- after all, it was a massive Union turnout for Ed;
    [​IMG]
     
  23. Steven

    Steven
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    Very well said. The voters in the NW, NE and Scotland prevented a Conservative majority and we have the current bad stench of Lib Dems having gotten mad off the power (they will not enjoy for another two generations)

    In my part of the world you have the benefit queue extending outside the post office every Monday morning yet the only new business opened up is the Ladbrokes across the road. Yet people voted for the Labour incumbent because "that is what they know" :rolleyes:

    As for Ed Miliband, he is too busy worry about the Coalition PR machine winning cheap shots and getting petty sound bites in from wikileaks (which is nothing more than the FOTM), that he is doing a wholly undistinguished job as the main opposition leader
     
  24. LanceR

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    That's not the brightest statement out there. What's wrong with taking the time off, he is entitled to it just like I am and he was probably helping his girlfriend (he's not married).
     
  25. Dave

    Dave
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    I agree, my political views are slightly left of centre but I'd never vote for one party all the time on the basis that that's "my" party.

    Ultimately we all vote for whoever benefits us the most and be damned the politics behind it.

    Strangely enough the way Labour are going the Lib Dems would have most likely had my vote but their total deference to Tory policies just to get a bit of power has totally made me view them in a different light.

    As for Ed Milliband he's very much out of his depth. He has no where near the charisma or presence of his brother who would have been the far better choice.
     
  26. krish

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    On average, I'm slightly left of centre (though very much a capitalist) but have voted for all three ... admittedly never Tory at the general election, but at local elections because they were the best local candidate. Voted Green at the European election, Lib Dem at the London Mayoral (regretfully, as I've since come to view Brian Paddick as an utter nobhead, and from first hand conversations with officers I understand many in the Met feel the same way), Lib Dem in May this year as I supported Cable and found nothing appealing about another Brown/Labour administration or Call Me Dave Vote For Change We're All In This Together.

    Was pleased about the coalition at the start, but it has descended into a fairly predictable The Thick Of It style farce incredibly quickly. The Con-Dem dynamic seems more like a "prefect-fagging" system, Lib Dem ministers akin to Sadaam's human shield prior to the first Gulf War; and yes, Ed Miliband has been a disappointing leader of the opposition. It's like he's still wet behind the ears, still in nappies, still in a training bra ... you get the picture :).

    So pretty much politics as usual with less expenses fiddling.
     
  27. overkill

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    Never voted Tory (and never would) but I've voted Labour, Green and Liberal in the past.

    Voted Labour last time out as the local Tory candidate fought a dirty campaign and was pure sleaze as a councillor. If it hadn't been for local issues I wouldn't have voted. Clegg was too slimy before the election and has shown his true colours after it. Brown, like Cameron, was unelectable.......

    There isn't, and never has been a 'Coalition'. We are getting pure (right wing) Tory policies rubber stamped by Liberals too power hungry to see (or care) that they have abandoned not only their current principles, but those of over a hundred years of Liberalism.

    Their weedy argument that 'things are worse than expected' holds zero water. The deficit estimate is unchanged from before the Election, and all govt depts were required to open their books to the opposition before the election.

    There is also, given the (very) short time it took to thrash out a deal, a nasty and growing suspicion that Clegg and DC had reached an agreement before the election. Democracy usurped?

    As for Miliband, it's far too early to tell whether he will be an effective Labour leader or not.

    Smith was written off after his first few months as Labour leader, but has since become remembered as the greatest PM we never had.
     
  28. damo_in_sale

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    Smith? :rotfl: PM me, I want to know what your drinking. :smashin:


    As for the Lib Dems, you appear to be confusing their history of Liberalism with the mixture of social liberalism and the nasty economic authoritarianism they have been associated with in recent decades (since SDP at least), of which you seem to like so much.

    No, they are returning to their Liberal roots, not abandoning them, and this was obvious to anybody who bothered to listen to what their leadership was actually saying before the election. Or for that matter anyone who read the Orange Book.

    I'm sorry you are disappointed, but I suggest you listen less to the folks who don't matter in the Liberal Democrats, like that silly little girl who seems to be on Question Time in perpetuity, or Menzies Campbell.


    And it would appear that you believe, like some others here, that it is right wing to aim to eliminate the budget deficit over a five year period.

    Not eliminate government debt, because this will increase to 90% of GDP on the Maastricht criteria, but just bring government income into balance with government expenditure.

    You think this is right wing? I'd call that eminently sensible, if not a little timid. But I'm an extremist of course :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  29. krish

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    Haven't written off Miliband, but in these times of 24hr rolling news political leaders have got to hit the ground running or they'll just go the way of IDS or Ming Campbell
    - though it's still true that a week is a long time in politics, and who knows what scandal might hit Dave ...
    Cokegate
    Oikgate
    Bullygate (he's known to switch off his fake humility, mock charm and socially sensitive image when the cameras leave, and go back to treating people like crap - as was widely known by the press when he was spin doctor at Carlton, and probably explains why he hired the infamous Mr Coulson)
    Bullingdongate
     
  30. Dave

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    Come on Damo, lets not pretend the huge cuts that the coalition are implementing in the public sector etc are not ideologically desirable to the right wing.

    I'm not saying they are unnecessary because they are to a point but it is rare indeed that a political party has had the opportunity to implement policies carte blanche that are so deliciously in line with what they would love to do anyway.

    If I hear a coalition politician blame everything on the former government once more I'm going to scream. Anyone would think that the Tory and Lib Dem MP's suddenly appeared out of thin air and had no part to play in government before the election.
     
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