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EAC slow to copy?

dogfonos

Well-known Member
Would appreciate views from other users of Exact Audio Copy (EAC)...

Great software and massively versatile which makes it rather daunting for a beginner but now I've grow accustomed to all its many features, I will continue to use it to rip my CD's to FLAC as it works superbly but it's very slow at reading music CDs. Typically, a 60 minute music CD takes around 40 minutes to copy (copy speed typically 1.2 x, according to EAC). Can I speed up copying in any way without compromising quality of copy?
 

Sinialtstar

Active Member
I have EAC set to "burst mode", this means that it just whizzes through them, something to do with the way it guarantees perfect rips (I think, I can't remember of hand).
Also is there a setup wizard that tests the drive? (I seem to remember something along those lines) has that been done?

Someone else will know better than I do, I can't be anymore help than that, sorry.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
Thanks sinialstar. I went through the EAC setup pretty thoroughly and, I think, chose the most secure/reliable settings - perhaps I'm paying the price in terms of speed. Yes, the disc drive was tested - I even inserted a knackered CD so EAC could verify some error checking standard (C2 or something?).

Interestingly, the only CD that gave a high copy speed (>11X) was one marked DDD. The other CD's so far ripped never managed a speed above 3X and most peaked at less than 2X. Most CD's aren't marked at all so I wonder if they were ADD or AAD. Maybe DDD discs rip much quicker? Or it could be coincidence.

Ripping my collection of music CDs is going to take several hundred hours at this rate. I'll investigate the 'burst mode'.
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
I stopped using EAC because it was too slow and complex. Give DBPoweramp a try for comparison.

DBPoweramp
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
I stopped using EAC because it was too slow and complex. Give DBPoweramp a try for comparison.

DBPoweramp
I'm torn. Having learnt most of EACs features, I'm seriously impressed with this software in many ways. Now I understand it's features (well, most of them anyway) and the way it works, I find it pretty logical and intuitive. Can't say that about most other software I've used. Just a shame about the slow speed.

DBPoweramp is often mentioned as a viable alternative and most folks get on well with it. If I feel I'm loosing the will to live, I'll check out DBPoweramp. No harm in taking up their offer of a free 21 day trial.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
I use EAC almost daily. I do not see how anyone could think it was either slow or complex. It is slow with scratched or dirty CDs but new or clean CDs it eats in 10 minutes ripping to FLAC.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
I use EAC almost daily. I do not see how anyone could think it was either slow or complex. It is slow with scratched or dirty CDs but new or clean CDs it eats in 10 minutes ripping to FLAC.
Interesting. All my discs are clean and in perfect-looking condition. None have refused to copy. I'm ripping to FLAC too. The slow speeds I'm experiencing might have something to do with the way I've set up EAC. Given the complexity of the setting up, I'll wait until I have a free half-day then trawl through it again.

The software is very versatile and has so many options to choose from that setting up appears complex to me also. I think this is because many concepts within the software will be new to many users - myself included - but once these concepts are understood and setup, it's simple to use.
 

flexi

Novice Member
It sounds like you have set up secure mode for EAC, I have found a big variance in copy speed with different drives using this method. All drives rip discs at different speeds in secure mode even when using the same disc, but it is usual that the ripping speed will not be the quickest in duration due to the processes involved in secure mode, the x1.2 you have does seem rather slow. When I had a batch amount of discs to rip to FLAC and time was a concern, I used batch mode but copied the tracks using the 'Test and Copy Selected Tracks' option this copies the track twice, (only once to your hardrive) producing a CRC value which is then compared to the test copy and if the CRC values match generally the are bit perfect, any which did not match I would then copy again using secure mode. I found with clean discs this worked with the larger majority of discs and saved a huge amount of time and I now use secure mode where I have fewer to process.
 
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