Dynamic range

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by lmccauley, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. lmccauley

    lmccauley
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2000
    Messages:
    3,646
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Newcastle
    Ratings:
    +411
    I spent a couple of hours taking photos in Edinburgh today (after recovering from the Hogmanay celebrations), and found it difficult getting a good exposure with the bright blue sky and generally dark buildings. Aperture mode kept blowing the sky, so I went to full manual so I could see exactly what was happening. I found that if I metered off the buildings, the sky was blown, but if I metered off the sky, the buildings were very dark. I ended up metering so that the sky wasn't quite blown (using the histogram and highlights feature in preview mode), and recovering the dark details in Adobe Lightroom using the "Fill Light" adjustment. Unfortunately, that has increased the noise on the pictures.

    Did I do anything wrong? Any alternative suggestions for metering better in those conditions? I wish camera manufacturers would concentrate more on improving the dynamic range of the sensors, rather than squeezing more megapixels out of them!

    Cheers,
    Liam
     
  2. onefivenine

    onefivenine
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2003
    Messages:
    3,353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Ratings:
    +616
    Have you thought about using filters? A polariser would take 2 stops out of the sky. Or an ND4 grad would do the same.
    Not sure what else to suggest apart from maybe bracketing exposures and then layer the images - HDR style if you are into that sort of PPing?
     
  3. lmccauley

    lmccauley
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2000
    Messages:
    3,646
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Newcastle
    Ratings:
    +411
    I didn't realise that about a polarising filter. A graduated filter would still have been a problem for most shots, because there was typically a church spire or castle sticking above the skyline :). I shall certainly investigate a polarising filter though.

    I did think about HDR, but I didn't have my tripod with me to get identical composition. I'll see if any are close enough, and give them a try in PS.

    Thanks,
    Liam
     
  4. HotblackDesiato

    HotblackDesiato
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    1,170
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    USA
    Ratings:
    +226
    Outside of HDR and you could try generating two copies from RAW for the high and lowlights and then blending as described here http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/digital-blending.shtml
    If the RAWs don't work there is a neat layer align feature in the CS3 beta which i've found to be a great help with lining up similar images which can then be blended as above
     

Share This Page

Loading...