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DVI-I to DVI-D lead

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by mwatson800, Apr 9, 2003.

  1. mwatson800

    mwatson800
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    I am sure this has been asked a 'thousand' times already(!), but where do I purchase one of these puppies from the internet?

    Also, is there any signal degradation over a 10m lead? or should I stick with a 5m lead if I can 'just reach'?

    Many thanks
    Matt :)
     
  2. Dutch

    Dutch
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    Hi Matt,

    You could try www.a2zcables.com They seem to have a good range of DVI cables. I think the recommended maximum length is 5m for a DVI cable.

    Steve
     
  3. gothmog

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    Lindy are a good bet.

    They do a 7.5m cable which is the limit of the official DVI spec.

    They also have a 10m cable that comes with a buyer beware warning, it may work depending on various factors like how hard you video card can drive it, what resolutions you are using etc.

    Being digital if you do push it too far it will start to behave very oddly indeed and the picture is unlikely to be acceptable :D

    -- Jon
     
  4. mwatson800

    mwatson800
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    Thanks guys ;)
     
  5. Anders_UK

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    £22 from RGB Communications.

    You can now get a 75Ft DVI cable from RGB too. I think it is DVI-I as well and can handle 1280x1024@60Hz, but sadly for me can't do it at 96Hz.
     
  6. mwatson800

    mwatson800
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    I am being told all I need is a DVI-I to DVI-I cable and the four extra pins it does not matter that they are not connected???

    Help!!!
    Matt :(
     
  7. mwatson800

    mwatson800
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    "You can now get a 75Ft DVI cable from RGB too. I think it is DVI-I as well and can handle 1280x1024@60Hz, but sadly for me can't do it at 96Hz."

    Two things worry me about this statement...

    "You can now get a 75Ft DVI cable" - :eek: I'm sure you mean 7.5ft!

    and

    "1280x1024@60Hz, but sadly for me can't do it at 96Hz" - if you are referring to input into a projector you will not be able to select anything other the 60Hz (it will just revert back to 60Hz if you do)

    UPDATE...just as an update, I just ordered a DVI-I to DVI-I lead and I'll let you know tomorrow if it all works!

    Matt :)
     
  8. Anders_UK

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    DVI-I will be fine...this will do both digital and analogue signals.

    Yep I mean 75FT not 7.5FT, it is an Inline product that RGB sell. The 96Hz frequency is for running 'stereoscopic' imagery from a hi-end graphics computer like the Onyx 3000 sat at the side of me. At this refresh rate and at 1280x1024 it just can't hack it, and I have to use line drivers with 4-core bnc between the DDTX and DDRX.

    You should be fine with what you got buddy.
     
  9. gothmog

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    Eeek! You have an AE300 yes?

    The AE300 has a DVI-D female on the back, this WILL NOT TAKE a DVI-I lead due to the extra pins.

    If you don't have an AE300 ignore me :D

    -- Jon
     
  10. mwatson800

    mwatson800
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    Yes I have a AE300, and yes fortunately I realised that DVI-I lead will not connect to a DVI-D connection late yesterday afternoon...I rang them and changed my order.

    You'd think their website would cut the jargon and just give you the facts though! ...and you'd think the 'man in the know' on the other end of the phone would of realised too when I explained what I wanted to him (it was him that recommended DVI-I too)?!!!

    Matt :rolleyes:
     
  11. mwatson800

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  12. joe davis

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    i have the ae300 and i got dvi cable. The adoption of LCD technology in computer screens has led to the development of the DVI standard (digital video interface). Early LCD screens converted the analogue signal from the computer into a digital signal within the LCD display. Significant improvements in image quality have resulted from the now widespread availability of graphics cards with digital outputs thereby avoiding any signal loss from a conversion to analogue in the graphics card and then back to digital at the screen.

    A new standard connector has been developed for the Digital Video interface comprising a rectangular block of 24 pins for the digital signal plus 4 pins either side of an earth pin for transmission of a conventional analogue signal where required.

    Four different versions of this connector are used:

    DVI-D single link

    - 18 of the 24 pins are used to carry a standard digital only signal. The 4 analogue pins are not present. DVI-D cables are supplied as standard with most NEC LCD screens.

    DVI-D dual link
    - All 24 pins are used to carry an enhanced digital signal for
    High resolutions e.g above 1600 x 1280. Again no analogue pins are present.

    DVI-I
    This connector can support both digital and analogue signals and is used on graphics cards and monitors to provide both options without having to incorporate both DVI-D and HD15 SVGA connectors.

    DVI-A
    DVI-A monitor cables carrying only the analogue signal, are used where one end is to mate with a DVI-I connector and the other end with a standard HD15 connector. NEC screens fitted with only DVI-I inputs come with such a cable as standard, for connection to analogue only graphics cards.

    The monitor cable itself is very different for digital signal transmission compared to analogue. The three coax cores for the RGB signal are replaced by foil shielded twisted pairs one for each colour plus a 4th twisted pair for xxxxxxx. The digital signal is very delicate and effective transmission over 5 metres cannot be guaranteed, which means that analogue SVGA cables will continue to be used in many applications e.g. where display units such as plasma screens or projectors are sited over 10m, from the signal.


    Choosing a DVI Cable

    If both graphics card and screen are fitted with DVI-I or DVI-D connectors then a DVI-D single or dual link cable should be used with a recommended maximum length of 5m. Longer distances up to 10m may work but this cannot be guaranteed and will depend on the make of card and screen. DVI-I combined digital analogue cables should not normally be used and may well not physically fit if either device is fitted with a DVI-D connector (as it would be unable to accept the 4 analogue pins).

    If one device has a DVI-I connector and the other a traditional SVGA HD15 connector then use a DVI-A to HD15 cable to carry an analogue signal.

    If a Matrox twin or quad head graphics card is used (G550/G200MMS) fitted with Molex LFH60 pin connectors then a special ‘splitter cable’ is used to connect the LFH60 connector to two LCD digital monitors. Tech Plus can supply these splitter cables in 1.8m, 3m and 4m length with other sizes to special order. Also available is a unique 20cm long DVI-D adapter cable to allow a standard DVI-D cable, (if supplied by the monitor manufacturer) to be used.
     

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