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DVD Widescreen Question

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by L00py^, Dec 10, 2004.

  1. L00py^

    L00py^
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    I have posted in here, because you always get a quick friendly reply. :offtopic:

    Just purchased Star Wars Trilogy, and on the main box has a 2:35 to 1 icon and also a letterbox 16:9 icon.

    But on each individual disc box has Anamorphic Widescreen(Aspect ratio 2:35:1). Can someone please explain whats the difference in 2:35 and normal widescreeen(16:9) as still to get my widescreen telly yet? Does this mean when I watch in 16:9 on my new shiny Tosh 36ZP48, I will still see black lines on the top/bottom of the screen? :lease:

    I can find any options to switch between 2:35 and 16:9 in the disc menu? :oops:
     
  2. redsox_mark

    redsox_mark
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    Yes, that's what it means. 16:9 is 1.77:1; 2.35:1 is wider. What the box is telling you is that the film is 2:35 to 1; the DVD is made for 16:9 screens, but the way it does that is by having black and the top and bottom.
    The amount of black isn't huge.
    If you really don't like it you can use options like zoom to fill the screen, but then you will lose some picture.

    Mark
     
  3. rcoundon

    rcoundon
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    Not sure if this is a silly question but are there any manufacturers that are looking to build 2.35:1 ratio TVs?
    I appreciate that these would take up more room.

    How about projectors? Can they cope with the wider aspect ratio?
     
  4. LV426

    LV426
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    There is forever some confuision about asprect ratios and so on, and/or the presence of black bars etc.

    Let my try to put it (once again!) into some sort of order....

    In terms of video signals, there are only two intended shapes - 4x3 and 16x9. So, it could be argued that all DVDs (in terms of their video signal) are either 4x3 or 16x9. Exactly. 16x9 video is also referred to as "anamorphic" and "enhanced for widescreen TVs".

    In the case of a (very) widescreen film, in most cases, 16x9 video is used, and it contains the film, plus some black padding to get it to the right shape. So, it's perhaps better described as (for example) "a 16x9 DVD containing a 2.35:1 (or 22x9) film".

    For interest, a 16x9 screen correctly displaying a 22x9 film (whether it's on a 16x9, or a 4x3 DVD) has about 75% of it's height (and all of its width) occupied by active picture, and about 25% occupied by padding.
     
  5. rcoundon

    rcoundon
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    Ok, I get you.

    If manufacturers came up with a 2.35:1 ratio TV then the film producers wouldn't need to resize in order to fit 1.77:1 ratio TVs.
    Movies that were filmed in 1.77:1 already would not need to be resized to fit on the wider TV screen.
     
  6. LV426

    LV426
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    Now, you've completely lost me.
     
  7. rcoundon

    rcoundon
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    I think what I'm saying is that the standard that has arisen in terms of TVs is 16:9.

    If this standard was 22:9 instead, then the original movie would not need to be altered in order to fit on a TV.

    Maybe I've missed the point :)
     
  8. Kevo

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    TV and Cinema have always been competitive and it's that reason that cinema went widescreen in the first place (1950s), because TV had just been invented and the film studios saw it as a major threat.....Enter widescreen in all it's guises to get people back to the cinema. And ever since TV has been playing 'catch up' with cinema.

    Although these days it's in the studios' interests to make their films transfer well on the small screen (4:3), which is why you see less of the 'ws pioneer' style like that of Sergio Leone and more of the 'frame for all' type like that of James Cameron using 'open matte'. Basically it the filem should look good at the cinema and on a 4:3 TV.

    Also, there are technical reasons (and restraints)as to why 16:9 was chosen which were of fare more significance to what Hollywood Directors use.
     
  9. LV426

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    No, I now see your point; thanks for restating it. It is of course true only if the movie is 22x9. Many are; many aren't.

    Here is another perspective:

    First, we have to accept that films are made primarily for the cinema in many shapes, varying from 4x3 to 22x9 (and beyond).

    In most cinemas, all shapes of film are projected at full height. Only the width of the projected image varies. When a film that is narrower than the full width of the screen is shown, the sides of the screen are masked and then often concealed by not drawing the curtains fully back. In effect, the shape of the screen is altetred to fit the film.

    We can't do this with TVs (although, theoretically, we could with front projection; but we should recognise that a large propiortion of DVD users will use TVs for their pleasure). TV screens are totally fixed in shape.

    If we consider the area of a 16x9 screen occupied by the active image,

    - for 4x3 material, it's about 75%
    - for 16x9 material, it's 100%
    - for 22x9 material, its about 75%.

    If the TV were any other shape, then the lowest percentage here would be lower. For example, if screens were 22x9, then a 4x3 image would occupy less than 60% of the area.

    Looked at it this way, it becomes clear that 16x9 is an almost perfect compromise.
     
  10. eddyad

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    If your 16:9 TV has the option, try using 14:9 for 4:3 material.

    1. Many analog TV programs are made in 14:9 now - they are the ones with narrow black bars top and bottom on a 4:3 TV or in 4:3 mode on a 16:9 TV. In 14:9 the black bars will disappear and the picture will be wider, making better use of the 16:9 screen.
    The area occupied is then 87.5% instead of 64%.

    2. For 4:3 material that fills the 4:3 frame the loss top and bottom by using 14:9 is so slight you'll never notice it, and you still make better use of the 16:9 screen.
    The area occupied is then 87.5% instead of 75%

    Some TVs (e.g. Sony) can be made to default to 14:9 for 4:3 material, whether analog on internal tuner or digital through AV input.
     

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