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DVD-reorders: what is possible ?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Mar©, Nov 1, 2004.

  1. Mar©

    Mar©
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    I want to buy a DVD-recorder, but frankly speaking: I do not know all the possibilities of such a device.
    In another topic, some helpfull members gave me some advice, but now I want to make a list of the most important features of a DVD-recorder.

    What I already know and want:

    - A huge harddisk
    - The best quality in recording that now is available
    - I want to see jpg-photos with my DVD ( I am a DSLR-freak)
    - I want to backup my VHS-tapes as-good-as possible.

    But maybe there are many other things that I want ? ;)

    - What do you mean by MPEG4 capability ? Is this the same as DivX ?
    Are there DVD-recorders which can record in MPEG4 ?
    Or, how do they record ? I presume that a film is always compressed ?
    Do they record in AVI ?

    - I really like the specs of the Panasonic recorders, and most because they are rather high reliable...

    - Progressive scan ? Useful or not ? For the moment I have a 100 Hz Panasonic CRT TV, but when prices become better, I like to buy a LCD or a plasma-TV...

    - Firewire input/output: I have a Sony mini DV-camcorder, but I make my films on my PC with Pinnacle 8. Is it nescessary to have FW in/out on the DVD-recorder ? In my PC I have a Plextor PX-708A.

    - High speed-dubbing ? Is this writing fom HD to DVD-R ???



    So if you can help me finishing my list, I would be enormous thankful ! :clap:

    For the moment I am dreaming of the Panny DMR-95H or DMR-500 ...



    Please excuse me for my rather faulty English... :blush:
     
  2. Mar©

    Mar©
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    Come on' guys....I promise no more new topics ( this week :D )....

    One has to start somewhere.... not ?

    I have browsed al the topics of this forum, but older topics are quite useless imho, the market of dvd-recorders changes quickly....


    :lease:
     
  3. Nelviticus

    Nelviticus
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    MPEG4 is a very efficient method of compressing video so that the files are smaller. Its main use on DVD recorders is so that you can transfer the recordings to memory cards and play them back on PDAs - hand-held computers. The quality of an MPEG4 file will not be as good as an MPEG2 recording (the format that DVDs use) because it will be more compressed.

    Think of MPEG4 recording as a gimmick - nice to have, but not very important.

    MPEG4 is similar to DivX but different. They both do the same job but they're different file formats - a bit like different languages. MPEG4 and DivX are the methods of compression and (I think) they can be used for AVI, Quicktime or Mpeg files. I could be wrong about that though!

    Progressive scan is better than interlaced. It gives a more stable, less flickery picture. However some TVs - like the one I have, a Panasonic TX32PD30 - do such a good job of improving interlaced pictures that it's hard to notice the difference when I switch to progressive scan mode.

    One down-side to prog scan is that it uses component video cables, not SCART. This means that you won't have any aspect ratio switching signals, so your TV will have to guess whether it's receiving a 4:3 or 16:9 picture.

    If you do your video editing on the PC there's no point in looking for a DVD recorder with DV-in (I don't know of any with DV-out). Although the editing facilities on DVD recorders aren't bad they're nowhere near as good as on PCs. Your PC will edit faster, have more options and be easier to use because you have a mouse and a keyboard.

    High-speed dubbing is from HDD to DVD.

    I have the Panny DMR-95H and I love it. If you don't need memory card slots or a DV input then the 85 is a lot cheaper but it only has half the HDD space. The 500 looks good, but I don't think it has many advantages over the 95. If I was going for a Panasonic I'd go for the 95 - hey, I did! - but you may want to look at the Toshiba RDXS32. A lot of people recommend it.

    Regards

    Nelviticus
     
  4. Mar©

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    Hey, Nelviticus,

    I own a Panasonic TX-25AS10F television ( 100 Hz )

    He has a SVHS connection and 3 RCA connections in the front.

    An in the back 2 scart connectors ( AV1/AV2 (S) 21 pens scart )
    and L & R audio out.

    Can I connect the DMR-500 via scart ?


    In don't see anyting about progressive scan in my TV manual....


    Two other questions:


    - Can you give me an idea of high speed dubbing ? ( how fast is it ? )

    - Can you recommand my any brands of DVD-RAM ( very difficult to find, here in Belgium )



    Thanks for your intresting reply !
     
  5. Nelviticus

    Nelviticus
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    - Most TVs don't support prog scan so if your manual doesn't mention it then you don't have it, so you don't need to worry about it!

    - You can connect the DMR-500 to your TV with SCART. This is the best way of connecting it and the manual should tell you more.

    - On the DMR-E95 you have to decide whether to record to your hard disc in 'normal' mode or in 'high-speed compatible' mode. Both have advantages and disadvantages:

    Normal mode:
    - Transferring a recording from hard disc to a DVD is very slow. It takes as long to transfer as it takes to play it.
    - Normal mode doesn't transfer your chapters, so if you set up chapters on your hard disc these won't be saved on the DVD.

    High-speed compatible mode
    - Transferring recordings to DVD can be many times faster, if the recording will fit on the disc. If it won't fit it will have to be converted, and will take as long as normal mode.
    - High-speed compatible mode doesn't transfer the widescreen signal, so the DVD disc won't be able to tell your TV whether it's a widescreen recording or not.

    - I don't use DVD RAM but if I did I'd probably use Panasonic.

    Regards

    Nelviticus
     

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