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DVD disc disables DMA

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by Ken, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. Ken

    Ken
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    I have a disc that plays fine on my laptop, but if I attempt to play it on my main system, it locks up and the next time I try to start TT2, DMA has been disabled and the only way to get it back is to do a restore.

    Nothing essoteric; Overlay wth no post processing.
    TT 2.05
    Ati 9500 - Cat 4.9 driver
    M-audio 24/96 - .27 driver
    Any ideas.

    Ken
     
  2. mjn

    mjn
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    Can't you just enable DMA again in device manager?
     
  3. Ken

    Ken
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    Unfortunately not; it's only this one disc, so I am not too worried, but it would be nice to know why it is happening.

    Ken
     
  4. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    The disc itself can't be disabling DMA .. what I guess is happening is that either the disc is marginal and the drive is mis-reading it and causing the device driver to crash, or perhaps the MPEG stream is being mis-handled by the codec .. whatever, the crash in turn is corrupting device data stored by Windows and the DMA setting is part of that data.

    Could be worth trying to use DVD Shrink to rip it .. that way something else will try to read the DVD which may give some clues, if it reads it then try playing the rip and see if TT crashes.
     
  5. Ken

    Ken
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    That,s a good idea. At least if it works I will be able to watch it on my main system. It's possible that my dvd drive is getting a bit old.
    Will report back.

    Ken
     
  6. Quantum

    Quantum
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    I dont know how useful this will be to you. I am quoting from an article which i cant find the url for at the moment. I am not endorsing this if you don't know what you are doing with registry editing you could hose your computer...you have been warned!!!

    "see
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/tech/storage/IDE-DMA.mspx

    PIO mode is enabled by default in the following situations:
    ...
    For repeated DMA errors. Windows XP will turn off DMA mode for a device after encountering certain errors during data transfer operations. If more that six DMA transfer timeouts occur, Windows will turn off DMA and use only PIO mode on that device.

    In this case, the user cannot turn on DMA for this device. The only option for the user who wants to enable DMA mode is to uninstall and reinstall the device.

    Windows XP downgrades the Ultra DMA transfer mode after receiving more than six CRC errors. Whenever possible, the operating system will step down one UDMA mode at a time (from UDMA mode 4 to UDMA mode 3, and so on).
    ..."

    " In my case a scratched DVD and later also an unreadable (overburned) CD did the trick, got the drive to choke and Windows to disable DMA for good. Later my hard disk hiccupped just once and also went back to PIO for good."

    "Re-enable DMA using the Registry Editor
    My thanks go to my fellow MVP Alexander Grigoriev who taught me this method.

    Run REGEDIT. Go to the following key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}

    It has subkeys like 0000, 0001, 0002, etc. Normally 0001 is the primary IDE channel, 0002 the secondary, but other numbers can occur under certain circumstances. Check the DriverDesc value to see which one it is.

    Delete MasterIdDataChecksum or SlaveIdDataChecksum, depending on whether the device in question is attached as master or slave, but it can't actually hurt to delete both. Reboot. The drive DMA capabilities will be redetected.

    Open Device Manager again and check whether the device is now actually using DMA mode. If so, congratulations, you've made it (at least until the next time Windows disables DMA).

    Alternative Method—Uninstalling the Port
    1. Uninstall the secondary IDE port
    To do that, open Device Manager as follows. Right-click on My Computer, select Properties, click on the Hardware tag, click on the Device Manager button, click on the plus sign to the left of IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller, right-click on Secondary IDE Channel, click on Uninstall. Deactivating is not enough.

    Reboot to make the changes active and permanent.

    After booting Windows will automatically reinstall the IDE channel and the DVD (or CD) drive. This Plug-n-Play process can take a little while, so give it a minute after the boot process finishes.

    2. Reactivate DMA
    But this is not enough, because unfortunately Windows does not automatically activate DMA on a DVD or CD drive. You have to tell Windows to try to use DMA first.

    For that, go to Device Manager again. Right-click on My Computer, select Properties, click on the Hardware tag, click on the Device Manager button, click on the plus sign to the left of IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller, double-click on the secondary IDE channel, click on Extended Settings and change the relevant setting from PIO only to DMA when available.

    On Windows NT and 2000 you now have to reboot a second time, but Windows XP applies the change instantly. Then you can go to the same place in Device Manager again and check whether the device is now actually using DMA mode. If so, all is well."

    All the above is quoted so I am not saying mess with your registry unless you are 100% happy with that but it could save you having to do a full restore.

    Thanks
    Paul
     
  7. Ken

    Ken
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    Thanks for that useful info Paul.
    The event viewer showed that the problem was with the cdrom/atpi, so I tried to rip the dvd with dvd shrink, but it would not read the disc.
    I ripped it on my laptop and transfered it to th htpc hard drive and it plays fine.
    So, the dvd drive just doesn't like this disc.
    Thanks for your comments gentlemen.

    Ken
     
  8. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    Not an unknown situation, though not too common luckily.
     

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