dvd camcorders?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by snake II, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. snake II

    snake II
    Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    Messages:
    353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    luton
    Ratings:
    +5
    Hi,

    anyone know if they are any good? I got my latest littlewoods catelogue and thats the first time I saw a dvd camcorder, so how come most uk and usa sites dont have em? can anyone help
    cheers
     
  2. thfccambs

    thfccambs
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Messages:
    23,952
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    White Hart Lane
    Ratings:
    +6,898
  3. MarkE19

    MarkE19
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    17,353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Rainham Essex
    Ratings:
    +2,441
    DVD camcorders do make life very simple. Take the disk out the cam and it should play straight away in most DVD players. To capture to a PC you just drop the disk into a DVD player.

    The down side is that the DVD's are only 8cm - not the full size comercial disks and therefore at the best quality they only record 20 minutes. Disks cost about the same a DV tapes, but can only be used once. The recording is highly compressed so editing on a PC will result in some loss of quality and many editing packages will not handle MPEG-2 editing.

    I think the way to decide if a DVD cam is the right choice is if you want to edit the footage on a PC. If you do then you are better off IMO with a DV cam, if not then a DVD cam should be fine.

    Mark.
     
  4. Hambone

    Hambone
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2002
    Messages:
    98
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Ratings:
    +6
    If you are editing dvdcam footage on a pc you will find it easier
    than using DV tapes.
    It is already mpeg2 standard so you don't have to spend all night
    rendering avi(microsoft standard capture by DV) to mpeg2( if you want to put it on a dvd after editing) You only have to render any transitions between clips(if used)
    All ulead products support dvdcam,don't know about the rest.
    The big boys are now behind DVDCAM,Sony Panasonic and Hitachi,the rest will follow.
    All new DVDCAM's support usb2 which is around the same transfer speeds as firewire(which is,will be a more standard connection than firewire )
    And yes the down side is the 20 minute recording per side but
    i have not have a problem with this and you can record to them as many times as you like,up to 100,000 times i believe.

    DVDCAM:smashin:
    And the quality is superb i play mine back on a Toshiba 36" PF2 widescreen tv and the quality is great.
    Also i nearly forgot to mention you don't a massive HD as 20mins
    is the lenth of the disc which is 1.4 GB so when you transfer it to
    you computer it is 1.4GB not 4 mins per GB as DV tape.
     
  5. MarkE19

    MarkE19
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    17,353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Rainham Essex
    Ratings:
    +2,441
    MPEG-2 files are not easily edited because the MPEG-2 compression means that each new frame only records the changes from the previous one with a full update only every 7 frames. Therefore you can get jumpy edits etc. Some software will reduce these effects, but only AVI is the full quality, full frame every frame type of file.
    USB2 can NOT be used to transfer full quality video! Only firewire can do this. USB2 can in theory be faster than firewire, but it can not sustain a consistent speed for transfer, therefore you will get content dropped frames etc if trying to use it - always assuming you can get software that will support it, which I doubt. Therefore USB2 will never replace firewire for video transfer.
    Only DVD-Ram disks can be used more than once and they can be very expensive. DVD-R are only record once.

    I'm not saying DON'T get a DVDCAM, just make sure you are aware of its limitations (and the same goes for DV cams) before you buy.

    Mark.
     
  6. Hambone

    Hambone
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2002
    Messages:
    98
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Ratings:
    +6
    Hi mark
    What you have to remember when you are transfering DVDCAM video you are transfering data(mpeg-2) not moving video(DV) so you do not get dropped frames etc via usb.
    I am using usb 1 (my DVDCAM is about 18 months old) which is much slower than the new usb2 cams and i don't get dropped frames.
    As for the 7 frames update thing i haven't got a clue but i don't get jumpy edits using ulead studio 7 which is quite a cheap editing program.
    And you can get ram discs for about 6 quid now although i did pay £25 for one when i first got my camera.

    What you also have to remember is whether you have DV or DVDCAM if you are putting your edited footage onto DVD or (VHS quality) svcd,vcd,you have to down the MPEG road.

    DVDCAM:smashin:
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice