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DVD camcorders...have I got this right?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by trouthead54, Mar 31, 2003.

  1. trouthead54

    trouthead54
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    I'll be in the market soon for a camcorder. The DV camcorder quality appeals, but it seems a bit off a faff connecting to a PC (firewire, transfer etc) & just watching them playback on ,y TV (connecting camera to TV etc). I've heard a little bit about DVD camcorders & just wondering if these will allow me to shoot, then watch the results on disk via my TV dvd player & also edit in my PC using the installed dvd player to read the recorded disk.

    I'm sure there'l be all sorts of format issues, but I just want simplicity. is it too early & should I retreat to the sidelines to wait until they sort all the niggles out?
     
  2. Brian110507

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    It takes only seconds to connect your dv camcorder to either your PC or your TV and is no bother or "faff" at all, but if this is to much for you you can now buy camcorders which actually have a disc inside them and record directly on that which you can then playback directly in your pc or player. Many dv cams also have an lcd screen on the side which means that you can watch your movies at any time without doing anything except press play.

    One of the great things about using dv though is that you can transfer it to you pc and then edit out all those bits and pieces that didn't come out exactly as you intended and then produce a VCD or DVD with your movie just as you wanted it.
     
  3. trouthead54

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    Thanks for the response.

    For my part, anything that involves connecting a things together & *then* transferring is not ideal - I have a slide scanner & minidisc that transfer over USB - it gets tedious....far better to have a storage medium that can readily be moved between camera, pc or dvd player. hence my question about formats?
     
  4. EvilMudge

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    I can only think of one problem with your suggestion, and that is that most if not all of the DVD Cams, are RAM cams, so you will need a DVD-RAM compatible DVD drive, which many aren't.

    However, before you despair, some of the cams may be able to write to DVD-Rs (but not DVD+Rs) which the Pioneer burners use as a native format, and is readable by most drives and players.

    HTH
     
  5. Brian110507

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    The Sony DCR-DVD100 and DCR-DVD200 due to be released in the summer claim to record on a DVD which is compatible with MOST home DVD players and PC DVD drives
     
  6. MarkE19

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    DVD-r camcorders tend to be expensive and so are the DVD-r's as they are not the full sized disks used on a DVD burner.
    At the best quality they will only give around 15 minutes of recording time. This quality will be about the same as mini DV, but around a quarter of the recording time.

    Mark
     
  7. Tunes Man

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    If you're thinking about spending the kind of money that these dvd camcorders cost, you might as well invest it in a 3 chip camcorder that uses dv tapes. Your quality of video will be so much better because I've heard that these dvd camcorders they're coming out with only have one ccd chip, but are stll very
    expensive. One ccd chip can't compare to the quality of three, as
    I've found out myself. Good luck in your decision, Tunes Man.
     
  8. Wayne Moule

    Wayne Moule
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    You can buy a DV cam and transfer it to a DVD-RAM/-R DVD recorder and edit it,all for under £800,hey Tunes Man!

    How about that then?

    :clap:
     
  9. TommyVecetti

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    The idea of DVD camcorders isn't very appealing. First off I don't like the idea of my footage being compressed to MPeg 2 straight away, and secondly I like to edit my footage on the PC using the firewire. I like to keep all my DV tapes as the raw footage.
     
  10. Wayne Moule

    Wayne Moule
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    If it's a digital camcorder,it's compressed to a digital form onto the tape anyway.

    The fact that DV is of high quality in the first place,be it on tape or DVD disc,should mean you'll see no drop in quality if you transfer it to PC/DVD-RAM/-R/RW etc.
     
  11. EvilMudge

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    Yes, but MPEG2 is far more lossy than DV, especially at the bitrates we're talking about, so keeping things at a lower compression level until after editing is a good idea.

    More importantly you can then adjust the compression level and bitrate of the output file, giving a much more 'professional' result.
     
  12. Wayne Moule

    Wayne Moule
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    I don't know which bitrates your are refering to,but DVD goes upto 10Mbps,which to the human eye does not look lossy.

    Do you know the bitrate of a DVD camcorder btw?
     
  13. EvilMudge

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    10MBit/Second can look lossy on a large display, and I doubt that RAM cams record at that rate.
    Anyway the advantage of using DV is that you can use variable bit rate to optimise the recording. My guess is that DVD cameras are for those who do not wish to edit, and are more interested in instant playback away from the camera on a TV screen.
     
  14. Tunes Man

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    I suppose that a dvd cam has the advantage of being played back right away with the lcd display, but most any decent camcorder can do that, but I still say that your best bet is a 3 chip
    camera so that you can retain the highest quality on the original recording, that way if you lose a little bit of quality after all the editing is done, it will still look good in the final mix. I don't have any experience with a dvd camcorder and don't know how good the quality is, unless they are making 3 chip dvd cams now. If they have come out with 3 chip dvd cams and I don't know about it, then I apologize for my ignorance. If you do purcase a dvd cam
    and you're happy with it, that's all that counts. Tunes Man.
     
  15. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    I have just got out an old copy of Computer Video mag (Feb 2003) that has a review of the Hitachi DVD cams.
    They record at 3mb/sec or 6mb/sec giving 60 or 30 minutes to a disk. The top 2 models in the range also do 3-10mb/sec variable giving only 18 minutes per disk.
    Conclusion of the review was good, but not great picture quality and not for people wanting to edit their videos.
    This is only one review for one make but does show the limits of a DVD camcorder.

    Mark.
     
  16. Wayne Moule

    Wayne Moule
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    Out of interest,does anyone know the bitrate of DV?
     
  17. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Back to the mag again.......

    DV is 3.6mb/sec

    Mark.
     
  18. Wayne Moule

    Wayne Moule
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    Now I'm a little bit confused.

    DV is 3.6Mbps,but is better than DVD that goes upto 10Mbps.

    :confused:
     
  19. TommyVecetti

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    The bitrate for DV video is actually about 25mb/second .The total data bitrate, including error protection and audio streams is about 36 Mbps.

    Dvds maximum bitrate of about 10 is quite weak in comparison. The only Mpeg2 based recorder that comes close to DV was/are D-VHS recorders with about 28mb/sec max.
     

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