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DV in/out?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by matri, Dec 3, 2001.

  1. matri

    matri
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    What exatcly is the purpose of the DV in?
    I want to buy a cam before tomorrow nite (cause its my bday and want to film everything!), but im not sure...
    I would like to transfer the movies on to my computer, and then burn them on cd or send them via email...Do i need the DV in to do this, or is the DV out enough? What if I want to edit the movies on PC?
    Last question: I think Im gonna go for the JVC tiny P1, what do u think about it?

    PS: Please reply asap, i need the cam for later today!!!
     
  2. steev

    steev
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    I think DV in is useful if you want to keep some edited video in full quality. You can put it back on a tape which is probably the cheapest storage.

    I bought a cheap JVC with no DV in, but I've seen this site

    http://www.smartdv.co.uk

    which offers relatively cheap DV in enable kits.

    Steve
     
  3. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    matri,
    Its always worthwhile checking some of the previous recent posts for quick answers... Camcorder illiterate needs help...someone else has probably asked the same questions before.

    DV in is pretty useful if you plan to edit on PC. It is simple to dump the edited film to DV Cam, then record DV Cam to VHS so those without a PC can share your memories.

    Regards
     
  4. Guest

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    http://www.lynxdv.com/dvstore/

    do dv in chekc the camcorder you are buying against there list making sure its there so u can enable dv in in future.
     
  5. colinrbarrett

    colinrbarrett
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    For anyone buying a DV or D8 camcorder, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend a DV-in model every time. It's useful for all sorts of reasons, but mostly because if you're editing footage in a computer and it's connected via the FireWire cable, you're then able to export the whole edited sequence back to a DV tape with no loss of quality at all. It's also a lot better than storing your finished job on VHS or whatever.

    The other thing is that many DV-in models are also analogue-in models, and this is extremely handy whenit comes to copying up your VHS, Video8, Hi8 or S-VHS "legacy" tapes to a digital format - whether or not you plan to edit them or burn them to DVDs (as I've been doing).

    Basically my advice is only buy a non DV-in model if you never, ever, plan to do any editing with it. And how many people can say that?

    Colin Barrett
    Freelance Contributor, "Camcorder User" and "What Camcorder" magazines.

    Website: http://www.simplydv.co.uk (includes info on DV-in and suggestions for converting analogue footage to digital).
     
  6. Kevin Priestley

    Kevin Priestley
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    My camcorder was disabled, so i got a widget, and I now use it to store finished stuff back to tape, it saves on hard drive space, is cheap, if you want it back on the hard drive it only takes as long as the length of the clip and the quality is full on.
     
  7. colinrbarrett

    colinrbarrett
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    Yes, that's what I do, too Kevin. What I also like is that by archiving everything back to the digital tape and then re-capturing later, all the scenes are re-detected by auto scene detection (if you're using a program that supports this) and all of your clips are separately identified in the clip bin ready to use. This works by the software recognising the changes in date and time of the timecode embedded into the recording (even after editing) and is very useful.

    One thing - I've been using the excellent Pinnacle Studio 7 lately and i was pleased to note that even when performing an analogue capture from, say, Video8 or VHS, that there's a setting that allows you to select "new clip on change of video image" (or something to that effect). This enabled, my capture created new icons for each shot, even though it was analogue. Impressive!
     

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