DV In/Out

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by Dirk Diggler, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Dirk Diggler

    Dirk Diggler
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    I'm just about to jump into the world of digital camcorders and have a couple of queries I hope may be answered

    I am looking to be able to transfer from cam to PC (already established I need a firewire card), do the edit, and show to friends on PC and or DVD. How useful is DV In/Out as I am looking at the Canon MV700 at £261 (without DV In) or the Canon MV700i at £313 (with DV In) !! So my question is "How useful is DV In?" Is it something that is worth paying the extra £££ for and if so why?

    Also, I have found a store selling a Firewire card, Cable and Pinnacle Studio 9 for £39.99. How good is Pinnacle Studio 9 and is the pack worth it, or does anyone have any other recommendations for editing software?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Blu Ray

    Blu Ray
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    I was faced with the same choice last year. I elected to just stick with DV out and have not seen any use for DV in at all. Basically I download my recordings, edit them on PC and burn to a DVD. The only use for a DV in is if you want to put your edited stuff back onto tape again.
    I use Pinnacle Studio 8 and it is excellent, IMO the best package out there (and I tried loads). The deal you have found sounds definitely worth it. Where is it?
     
  3. Brian110507

    Brian110507
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    The prime purpose of having DV-in is to allow you to record your finished and edited video back to a blank tape in the camera at full DV quality - you will then be able to recover all your hard disc space for future use - remember video files are very large and will eat space on your HDD.- this will then allow you to keep your masterpiece for ever and if you do decide you want to improve or change it you can import it back to your PC at full quality.

    Many people think that because they have recorded it to DVD they do not need a further back-up but remember first that a DVD video is very compressed so you can never recover your video at full quality, there are also a number of issues about the life of a DVD, some people are beginning to report problems of non-playing on discs 8 - 10 years old. There are also all sorts of damage that can happen to a DVD - a scratch - your beautiful label lifts the backing - the felt tip pen ink bleeds through - all can prevent your DVD playing but if you have the backup on tape you can make another at any time.

    A number of people who did not listen to the advice to spend a little extra to get DV-in are now regretting the move - I strongly advise you to get a camera with DV-in (as well as the conventional out of course)

    I personnaly do not use Pinnacle but I have contact with a number of people who do and they are very happy with version 9 - but version 8 had a number of problems appantly so be sure you get 9.
     
  4. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    I'll second Beejaycee's thoughts on DV-in on the cam!

    The real problem with recordable DVD's is as said that they can be easily damaged. The other thing is that they use a dye that is burnt by the laser of the recorder that is 'organic'. The problem with this is that if the air gets to the dye it can start to 'rot' making the disk unreadable within a matter of months in some cases. Newer disks are getting better at lasting longer, but DVD is still not recommended for long term archiving of your video footage. Therefore a high quality backup is highly recommended.

    Mark.
     
  5. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    Agree with all that was said before, MiniDV has higher resolution and uses less compression than DVD, though DVD is obviously ideal for sharing (once you get beyond the +/- compatibility issue).

    DV in is a good idea for archiving on DV, but also a camera such as the Canon 700i has analogue in also, allowing you to either back up analogue recordings on DV, or to use the camera as a live codec to go from AV-in to firewire.

    If you can get hold of one I would go for the MV600i instead, should be cheaper and supports S-Video in/out as well as AV in/out, it also has a microphone socket should you wish to upgrade to a better mic at any point in the future, and it comes with a infra red remote control! (700i doesn't).

    600i's usually had Pinnacle 8 bundled with them, which I use for my DVD authoring and find stable enough (with either 8.10 or 8.12 free upgrade from the pinnacle site).

    You should also get a 600i for a bit cheaper than a 700i as it now (merely a few months) out of date.

    Pinnacle 9 does allow widescreen preview though, if you are intending to shoot using the 16:9 mode. Whether this makes it worth buying seperately is up to you.
     

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