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Discussion in 'Movie Forum' started by Zog, Jan 3, 2002.

  1. Zog

    Zog
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    Anamorphic.............. What the hell does it mean?
     
  2. mjn

    mjn
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    anamorphic dics contain a higher resolution compared to normal non-anamorphic discs. So when viewing them on bigger screen, you get a better quality image. With non-anamorphic pictures you will have to use the "zoom" function to make the image the correct size on your TV/display.
     
  3. Ian Cox

    Ian Cox
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    There has been plenty of discussion on this subject, if you do a search on this forum you should find plenty of material.

    If not go to this guide http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articles/anamorphic/welcome.html which is really good and should give you all the information that you will ever need about Anamorphic Widescreen and why it is so important for people with WS TV's
     
  4. General Skanky

    General Skanky
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  5. michaelm

    michaelm
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    Basically an anamorphic picture is a picture that has to be squeezed vertically to be presented correctly. In it's full 4:3 image pictures look elongated, ie people look 10 feet tall and exceedingly thin.

    An anamorphic picture on a dvd or digital tv will look much better because the full 525 line picture gets compressed into a much smaller area, giving a great deal more detail and clarity than a non-anamorphic, or "letterboxed", picture.

    I think.
     
  6. bishman

    bishman
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    from www.websters.com

    an·a·mor·phic (n-môrfk)
    adj.
    Relating to, having, or producing different optical imaging effects along mutually perpendicular radii: an anamorphic lens.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [ana- + -morph + -ic.]


    Not sure that helps much though!!

    It only relates to widescreen images and is irrelevant to any material recorded in 4:3 full frame. It is also an irrelevance to anybody with a 4:3 TV unless they are going to upgrade to a widescreen. As previously stated, an anamorphic output will appear tall and thin on a 4:3 display, like normal TV. On a widescreen TV, you can use the widescreen mode to stretch the picture across the full width of the tube, reverting everything to it's correct proportion. A non anamorphic image needs to be zoomed in on with a widescreen TV and so the resulting image is less clear. This is why some people will not buy non anamorphic material.

    It is important to go into your DVD players setup menu and select the correct TV type or you will get an incorrect output. If you select 16:9 when you have a 4:3 TV, the picture will look tall and thin. When you select 4:3 the player processes the picture to output it in the correct ratio with the black bars top and bottom. If you have a widescreen TV and select 4:3 in player setup, the image will be output in the correct ratio for a 4:3 TV and will need to be zoomed like a non anamorphic picture, thus making it pointless being anamorphic on the disc.

    Another thing that confuses some people is that an anamorphic picture does not necessarily fill the whole of a widescreen 16:9 TV and can still have black bars top and bottom, as this is dictated by the pictures aspect ratio, which is another matter altogether.

    I think that explains it, but I have probably confused things even more :D
     

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