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DTS/DD is it the same mix?

Discussion in 'Movie Forum' started by Fonzerelli, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. Fonzerelli

    Fonzerelli
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    Is this surround sound mix the same with both formats? just one is a higher bit rate isnt it?

    how does each differ in the actual film making process, does a director/producer/editor or who ever create the sound track then send the same one set of "uncompressed audio" or how ever i should decsribe it. then Dolby and DTS both compress them to fit on dvd? or do Dolby and DTS work together with the film makers and create the audio tracks independantly?
     
  2. Marv

    Marv
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    At a guess i'd say the sound guys make the soundtrack and then encode it in each format. Suppose its up to the studio to decide what bitrate version there gonna use on the dvd.
     
  3. Roohster

    Roohster
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    The mix is the same, otherwise they'd be doing one for DD, one for DTS, one for SDDS.....
    It's just the encoding that's different.

    The mix is created as multi channel uncompressed audio, mastered onto multi channel digital tape, then sent off to Dolby, DTS etc. for encoding.

    Dolby and DTS don't get involved in the mixing process, that's left to the sound engineer (dubbing mixer) and the director.
     
  4. Fonzerelli

    Fonzerelli
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    Thanks so the excitment behind DTS is only down to quality!!
     
  5. Roohster

    Roohster
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    Pretty much - you'll find endless debate about the pros and cons of DD vs DTS on these forums, but the general concensus is that DTS mixes sound more dynamic.
     
  6. Fonzerelli

    Fonzerelli
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    What do you mean by "dynamic" mate?

    i do believe DTS is a lot better sounding than DD, but now i know its the exact same mix i kinda feel for the people who are buying DTS dvd's for the sake of it!!
     
  7. pez

    pez
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    I was of the understanding that most movie soundtracks are remixed for dvd, and if they offer dts then they do additional mixing for it.

    which would explain why the dts 6.1 discrete and the dolby ex mixes of The Two Towers sound so different.

    pez
     
  8. FoxyMulder

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    The mix is not always the same.

    The Haunting and Saving Private Ryan and several others use different mixes and thats why you hear a different sound.
     
  9. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt
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    Audio preparation for DVD is a grey area, with authoring facilities skirting the edge between mastering and mixing. There is only one primary mix, but it may be altered for mid-field environments, audio elements may be replaced or corrected and dialogue levels may be brought forward and surround channels toned down. Many of these things skirt mastering and mixing; whether the end product qualifies as a new mix I couldn't say.

    In many cases, the soundtrack eventually heard on a DVD is a very different beast from that heard in cinemas. As far as domestic DTS and Dolby Digital soundtracks are concerned, in recent years both have usually used the same master, but this varies from distributor to distributor. This was not always the case, however. Mix magazine conducted a very good interview with Mi Casa Studios in 2002 that explains exactly what an authoring and mastering house does, and is available online here

    Adam
     
  10. Roohster

    Roohster
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    By "dynamic" I mean less compressed, more dynamic range.

    In general, the same mix is used, but as someone has pointed out, there may be exceptions.
    Why they would bother going to the trouble and expense though is beyond me.
     
  11. James45

    James45
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    Great link thanks Adam. Mi Casa are responsible for some of the best DVD soundtracks out there.
     

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