Dts 96/24

P

paiger

Guest
So what is it? I hear it's an alternative to DVD-A.

My amp can decode it but how do I play it? Is it encoded onto any/all DVD-A disks? Do I need a DVD-A player to play them or will any old DVD do?

Any insights?

S
 

UrbanT

Distinguished Member
Hi Paiger,

96/24 is an alternative to DVDA but technically it is not as good.

It does not come on all DVDA discs, the only one of my (few) discs to have it is Queens, A Night at the Opera. All you need to play is a DVD player that is DTS compatible, and an amp that decodes the signal correctly such as the A1SR. The signal is sent via the normal optical/electrical link from player to amp.

Hope this helps :)
 

Nic Rhodes

Distinguished Member
Originally posted by UrbanT
96/24 is an alternative to DVDA but technically it is not as good.

Technically different yes, but still VERY HIGH quality and FULLY backwards compatible. Interesting format but technically very difficult to implement on receivers, the discs are the easy bit. I would be interested to see if it takes off.
 

ceejay

Active Member
The Sony 1080 supports it I think. There is an option to select it in the config. Are there any discs out there that have it (not DVD-A)? I'd like to hear if it's any good...

CJ
 
P

paiger

Guest
Yeah, my 1080 will auto decode it on the spdif input. I don't have any material for it yet. Would be interested in finding out a bit more. Seems to avoid the complications of DVD-A and SACD.

Steve
 

Reiner

Active Member
It's DTS' own version of a multi-channel audio format.

Yeah, another format to worry about .... :(
 

Nic Rhodes

Distinguished Member
Got my Queen disc today from Vivante, ordered late April! :( Still I don't I have 24/96 DTS yet. ;)
 

Adam Barratt

Standard Member
DTS 96/24 is a peculiar little format. It's too big to ever become a common format on DVD-Video and really offers no advantages for film soundtracks (but distinct disadvantages for those without DTS 96/24 decoders: taking up twice the space with no sonic improvement). Its only really practical use is on DVD-Audio, where 96kHz reproduction can actually be utilised with 96kHz source material. Unfortunately, these discs tend to have actual lossless MLP/PCM soundtracks, making the DTS soundtracks essentially redundant.

The whole concept of a lossy format such as DTS reproducing ultra high frequencies is quite unusual in itself. The compression system used by DTS eliminates or reduces the quality of this information under normal circumstances to improve compression, using the premise that it isn't actually audible. Not to be cynical, but it seems like more of a marketing exercise than a format with a practical application.

Adam
 

The latest video from AVForums

Oculus Quest 2 VR headset + Rotel A14 MkII Amp Reviews & Best of the Month
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom