DSLR crop factors?

  • Thread starter Nick Cartwright
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Nick Cartwright

Guest
What is the crop factor of the popular DSLR’s?

I know that the Olympus 4/3’s cameras are 2x.

How about the Canon and the Nikon cameras?


Thanks
 

h4rri

Novice Member
Nick Cartwright said:
What is the crop factor of the popular DSLR’s?

I know that the Olympus 4/3’s cameras are 2x.

How about the Canon and the Nikon cameras?


Thanks

IIRC 1.6 meaning you multiply the focal length of the lense by 1.6 to receive the 35mm equivalent
 

Sigismund

Well-known Member
Hi there.

I think Canon is 1.6x and nikon 1.5x - hope I've that the right way round! :)

Are you thinking of "jumping ship"?
 

T0MAT01

Novice Member
Not all Canon DSLRs have a 1.6x crop factor, the 350D does, but the 1D Mk2 N has a 1.3x and the 5D and 1DS Mk2 are full frame cameras which means no crop factor, i.e. the sensor is the same size as 35mm film.
 
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Nick Cartwright

Guest
Mark Haywood said:
Hi there.

I think Canon is 1.6x and nikon 1.5x - hope I've that the right way round! :)

Are you thinking of "jumping ship"?
No, not ready to jump ship, I really like the Olympus even though I have no real point of reference.

It was just something I read in a review of the Olympus Zuiko 7-14mm lens (14-28mm 35mm equivalent). The review said for the price you could buy a 350d and a 10-20mm lens. (the Olympus 7-14 is around £1100!)

That would give you 16-32mm equivalent, only 2mm longer than the Olympus.

If the Nikon is a 1.5 crop factor then you could get a D50 + Sigma 10-20 for even less and get even closer!

Seems if you want to go wide then the Olympus E-System is an expensive way to do it!!!!
 

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