Driving without due care and Attention a possible ban?

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dmpzsn

Well-known Member
I guess some people feel the need to defend themselves against something that wasn't even said ?

As for driving while distracted, emotional, etc. I think I can safely say we have all done it occasionally. It's a problem if it happens continuously.
If that was aimed at me, @Thug indicated that he was an elderly guy, 70 is certainly not elderly now. There are centurians still driving and passing driving assessments.

I know a lot of younger drivers who wouldn't pass a test nowadays.

Please don't make comments you can't back up, My post was to prove that not all ELDERLY can't drive. I take a re-test every three years, when did you last take an assessment.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
IMHO young drivers are probably more likely to be distracted than older drivers. Phones, loud music, exuberant passengers etc...

A look at the statistics will tell you that drivers over 65 are involved in significantly more accidents per million miles driven than any other group except young drivers, where the numbers are broadly the same. The figures for over 85s are particularly scary, as deaths and life changing injuries are much higher for this group.

Modern cars, hybrids and electric in particular accelerate extremely quickly out of the blocks and average speeds on open roads are still increasing as the average power output of cars continues to climb. Couple this with increasing technology and other distractions in newer cars and for many older drivers are struggling to adapt.

The one thing that is not improving at the same rate is the roads themselves. Government and local authority efforts seem to be focused on reducing traffic speeds rather than improving design speeds so that cars can travel at speed more safely.

We have I guess, about 20 years more pain until self driving electric cars become the norm and the driver is largely taken out of the equation. Until then we are in a situation where many of us are ill equipped to handle modern traffic conditions and the vehicles we drive.
 

Thug

Moderator
If that was aimed at me, @Thug indicated that he was an elderly guy, 70 is certainly not elderly now. There are centurians still driving and passing driving assessments.

I know a lot of younger drivers who wouldn't pass a test nowadays.

Please don't make comments you can't back up, My post was to prove that not all ELDERLY can't drive. I take a re-test every three years, when did you last take an assessment.
Like it or not (not aimed at anyone), 70 is elderly.
when you reach that age you can retire, your body doesn’t repair itself as quickly as it used to, your reactions can be effected, your eyesight diminishes. The average age of death is only 11 years more.
All this happens because you are advancing in years.

Does this mean you are no good at driving? Of course it doesn’t. Does this mean younger people are better and safer? Of course not. Does this mean you should hang up your driving gloves (and tartan blanket)? No of course not.
That’s why speed limits are set the way they are. They have to allow for the best and worse drivers on the road.

One thing not mentioned is the oncoming vehicle. Who was driving that?
Why could they not take avoiding action? If they had seen what was unfolding in front of them then maybe they could have avoided a collision too. This was 2 cars heading towards them with the one in lane 2 approaching the end of it having nowhere to go. If observant they should have seen this.
I am not victim blaming here, I am trying to grasp how it all happened and a map of the road would help too.
One thing I learnt from driving and riding motorbikes is that you have to drive for other people on the road and not just for yourself.
 

dmpzsn

Well-known Member
Like it or not (not aimed at anyone), 70 is elderly.
when you reach that age you can retire, your body doesn’t repair itself as quickly as it used to, your reactions can be effected, your eyesight diminishes. The average age of death is only 11 years more.
All this happens because you are advancing in years.

Does this mean you are no good at driving? Of course it doesn’t. Does this mean younger people are better and safer? Of course not. Does this mean you should hang up your driving gloves (and tartan blanket)? No of course not.
That’s why speed limits are set the way they are. They have to allow for the best and worse drivers on the road.

One thing not mentioned is the oncoming vehicle. Who was driving that?
Why could they not take avoiding action? If they had seen what was unfolding in front of them then maybe they could have avoided a collision too. This was 2 cars heading towards them with the one in lane 2 approaching the end of it having nowhere to go. If observant they should have seen this.
I am not victim blaming here, I am trying to grasp how it all happened and a map of the road would help too.
One thing I learnt from driving and riding motorbikes is that you have to drive for other people on the road and not just for yourself.
Yes, you can retire at 68, you used to be able to retire at 65. People are living longer and what was old age now not so much. I agree that the body doesn't heal as quickly.

My blanket isn't tartan it's plaid, but I don't use it all the time.

I think we'll have to agree to disagree, but last comment, I have very ill health and have done so since my 40s but I can still work and intend to do so for as long as I can, (hopefully).
 

nvingo

Distinguished Member
One thing not mentioned is the oncoming vehicle. Who was driving that?
Why could they not take avoiding action? If they had seen what was unfolding in front of them then maybe they could have avoided a collision too. This was 2 cars heading towards them with the one in lane 2 approaching the end of it having nowhere to go. If observant they should have seen this.
I also considered this, maybe their options were limited, a cyclist on the inside, railings on the pavement edge, or narrow lane would have prevented swerving away, ot that driver also being distracted.
Of course the correct reaction would be an emergency stop, rather than attempting or hoping to squeeze by whilst maintaining speed.
 

Thug

Moderator
Yes, you can retire at 68, you used to be able to retire at 65. People are living longer and what was old age now not so much. I agree that the body doesn't heal as quickly.

My blanket isn't tartan it's plaid, but I don't use it all the time.

I think we'll have to agree to disagree, but last comment, I have very ill health and have done so since my 40s but I can still work and intend to do so for as long as I can, (hopefully).
So, if you are not old then are you middle aged?
I am 52 next week and have less years ahead than i do behind, so would (reluctantly) call myself middle aged.
In fact I have been middle aged for about 10-15 years.
If the average age of death is 81, then 40 is the middle of that, so middle aged.
What age in your eyes is old? Or is it a state of mind or ability of body rather than a number?
This is not being judgemental or having a dig but stating a fact we all have to live with when we get older. Would someone look at someone in their 70's and say a middle aged gentleman or elderly chap?
I certainly dont feel as i thought i would at my age, and often look at people i went to school with thinking how old they look, but have to face the fact i am not as young as i was either.

As for work, it all depends on what job you do. I certainly couldn't do my current job in my 60's never mind 70's. I struggle now in my 50's, and i am reasonably fit.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Or is it a state of mind or ability of body rather than a number?
It's a state of mind. My body's been knackered for years. Have to drive automatics because of spinal problems, although I can still drive manuals but who in the right mind wants a coffee grinder in the middle of the car.

Reactions. I don't know because I still retain a healthy ability to read the road ahead and look for hazards as I was trained and you don't really lose that. It still amazes me that people cannot work out what's going on in front of them until it's right in their face or is filling their mirrors with blue lights and then hit the panic button.

I still think that people are taught how to pass their driving test but are not really taught how to drive and there is a difference. You learn from experience but you also learn to live with your driving failings and most are reluctant to admit to those failings. How you can rectify that without incurring a huge bill for the individual is unlikely to be forthcoming.

I am a driving god. ;)
 

booyaka

Moderator
I'm closing this thread for now.

With a court case pending - Any information/discussion/evidence should NOT be discussed at all.

I'll confer with admin/senior but I suspect this need to remain closed.
 
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