driveway block paving will now need planning permission when?

shoestring25

Distinguished Member
in the future they are on about making you have to get planning permission to block pave your driveway. does anybody know when this comes in to effect or whether they have even made a decision about it yet?
 

shoestring25

Distinguished Member
cheers

i took up some of it a couple of weeks ago so as ive stated it wont need planning permission now. so i can now take as long a i like
 

Kwman

Well-known Member
I thought they were suppose to make it more easier to make house improvements ?

You are gonna need planning permission to redo your drive in Oct 08 ?
 

Moviebuff

Well-known Member
I thought they were suppose to make it more easier to make house improvements ?

You are gonna need planning permission to redo your drive in Oct 08 ?


I saw a TV article on this, and it's all down to the amount of flooding some areas are prone to. Instead of being able to drain into the ground,
the water lays on top of large areas of concrete, or block paving, and then relies on the drains system to be able to cope with it.

Therefore, they are trying to regulate the amount of areas that are harded over.
 

shoestring25

Distinguished Member
you will still be able do as much block paving or concreting as you want. you just have to have to create drainage channeling in the driveway to a soak away, not to the sewage system. building control are just getting involved to make sure you drain to your property rather than connect to the sewage system.
 

Moviebuff

Well-known Member
you will still be able do as much block paving or concreting as you want. you just have to have to create drainage channeling in the driveway to a soak away, not to the sewage system. building control are just getting involved to make sure you drain to your property rather than connect to the sewage system.


You can also use a block material, that is extremely porous - apparently it is far more expensive than traditional paving materials though.
 

Desmo

Distinguished Member
Just do it anyway as nobody will know when it was done :D
 

Kebabhead

Novice Member
then relies on the drains system to be able to cope with it.

If councils actually spent money (rather than increasing councillors expenses) on cleaning their drains and gullies out on a regular basis then we won't get as much flooding :rolleyes:
 

gavan

Novice Member
If councils actually spent money (rather than increasing councillors expenses) on cleaning their drains and gullies out on a regular basis then we won't get as much flooding :rolleyes:

Well, I guess they could spend multiple billions of pounds improving the sewage systems to the point where they could carry all the surface water which formerly would have soaked into the ground (until it was paved/concreted over).

But I suspect the general public would baulk at the cost and inconvenience of having just about every road in Britain dug up.


Making sure that paved over garden space has proper drainage in place to compensate for the lack of water soaking into the bare earth is a common sense rule.
 

Kwman

Well-known Member
Well, I guess they could spend multiple billions of pounds improving the sewage systems to the point where they could carry all the surface water which formerly would have soaked into the ground (until it was paved/concreted over).

But I suspect the general public would baulk at the cost and inconvenience of having just about every road in Britain dug up.


Making sure that paved over garden space has proper drainage in place to compensate for the lack of water soaking into the bare earth is a common sense rule.


Should have been done progressively, but like all things in the UK it starts off top of the range and then due to years of neglect become poor. Railways, Roads, Hospitals, Underground, Water pipes, gas pipes, etc
 

gavan

Novice Member
Should have been done progressively, but like all things in the UK it starts off top of the range and then due to years of neglect become poor. Railways, Roads, Hospitals, Underground, Water pipes, gas pipes, etc

The sewer system wasn't designed to cope with the volume of surface water resulting from a craze for paving over every inch of front garden space in urban areas to use as a parking space (or just to avoid the chore of gardening). It doesn't help that often people treat the drains as some sort of public litter bin either.

Ensuring that homeowners put adequate precautions in place to deal with the flooding consequences of paving over garden space seems pretty sensible to me.

With the increasing amounts of rain we seem to be getting these days this is an issue which is going to have to be faced unless people want to experience localised flooding as a matter of routine.
 

Kwman

Well-known Member
The sewer system wasn't designed to cope with the volume of surface water resulting from a craze for paving over every inch of front garden space in urban areas to use as a parking space (or just to avoid the chore of gardening). It doesn't help that often people treat the drains as some sort of public litter bin either.

Ensuring that homeowners put adequate precautions in place to deal with the flooding consequences of paving over garden space seems pretty sensible to me.

With the increasing amounts of rain we seem to be getting these days this is an issue which is going to have to be faced unless people want to experience localised flooding as a matter of routine.

What seems sensible is to upgrade the infrastructure as time goes by and not put it on the home owners. If the council or government allows for the building of more houses, etc then this should have been done ages ago.
 

shoestring25

Distinguished Member
£600 !! surly not just for a planning application for a driveway.

i will be ok looks like i will finish my driveway in the next couple of weeks.

it will have taken 3 months
 

grantsteve

Well-known Member
I see they have noe settled on a 'fee' for the application. £600, our local builder has just finished the mandatory 'course' !

Your local builder is taking you for a ride my friend - the planning application fee is £150.

I suspect he (and I dare say a number of others like him) will try and con people out of a few quid by claiming to be an expert and talking up the process. Its really very simple and needn't cause you any problems.
 

PJTX100

Distinguished Member
I can't believe what I'm reading here.

You'll need planning permission to wear a loud shirt in the hours of darkness soon.

From what I've read this permission is only needed if you intend to extend the driveway into the garden area, not if you intend to simply block-pave the existing driveway.
 

grantsteve

Well-known Member
From what I've read this permission is only needed if you intend to extend the driveway into the garden area, not if you intend to simply block-pave the existing driveway.

Aye, that's right. Only if you are creating a new area of hardstanding where previously there wasn't any, by for example as you suggest turning part of your garden into a driveway.
 

gavan

Novice Member
And it's one of the few examples of extra rules which actually make sense and are grounded in reality.

Unfortunately, we have had so many 'Nanny state' impositions on our lives over the last decade that people assume that every new rule must be B.S.
 

mij

Well-known Member
If everyone had a driveway with a dropped kerb, where would the council put it's parking meters!
 

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