DRH Slimline Screen

Bleeders

Active Member
Just bought a 231cm/130cm 16:9 Slimline screen from DRH, just wondering what fittings would be best to secure this to the ceiling?
 
R

Rattus

Guest
The DRH uses two screws at each end of the screen I think, one goes into a keyhole shaped hole in the bracket, then the other locks it in place.

Ideally you want to drill through your ceiling plasterboard, and anchor securely into a joist. failing that, drill through in between the joists, then fix noggins in to take the screws.

If you don't know what a noggin is, then you may want to call in Tommy Walsh ;o)

Good luck with it, if you need more pointers, I can draw you a diagram

Martyn
 

Bleeders

Active Member
Thanks for that Martyn.

I think there is a joist where the screen will be situated, so might have got lucky there, but will only find out when we go to put the thing up. :)

Stupid question time - do the DRH Screens come with fitting instructions at all?
 
R

Rattus

Guest
Dunno mate, I've only seen the pictures on their site. My screen (on it's way courtesy of ScreensUK and TNT) is an ellie, which has removable/adjustable brackets to aid mounting.

If your joist is parallel to the screen, you'll have to watch that you get both screws to bite properly into it. If the screen is at right angles, you'll obviously need to hit two separate joists with the screws or use noggins.

A noggin (for those who don't know) is just a cut down piece of joist, the same length as the gap between joists, that you attach between the joists, usually with long nails going through the joist into the end of the noggin.

Best to use a powered frame nailer rather than a hammer. This is partly because it does it in one operation, quick and easy with less plaster dust being shaken off everything, and partly because nailguns are such fun to use ;o)

Enjoy

Martyn
 

Chipster

Standard Member
My DRH did not have any fitting instructions, but it is pretty obvious once out the box. If you havent found out allready, screw holes need to be very accurate, and use a spirit level, dont just assume your walls are sqaure.

Once up, if a manual screen, it does take a little getting used to the rise drop action, but you will soon get the knack.

Overall an excellent screen and much better than my temp ikea blackout blind.

Good service from DRH too.

Chipster.
 

WeirdFish

Active Member
I'll just add this to Chipsters answer...


Take your own measurements of the bracket positions when you get the screen as the dimensions on the website are not exactly right, and you need to be pretty accurate when locating the screws for the keyholes.
 

nunew33

Standard Member
Er you most probably know this by now as it will have been delivered...but you can fix it to the wall instead of the ceiling if this is easier (was for me joists in wrong position and couldnt be bothered with fitting noggins)
 

Bleeders

Active Member
Thanks, it did go on the wall in the end, since it was much easier - or so we thought.

Whilst my Dad was drilling the holes, he hit the main electrical wire causing us to lose EVERYTHING but the lights, so 4 hours, an electrician and £100 later, the screen went up and looks superb. :D
 
A

ailean

Guest
DOH! :)

Hehe, an Electrical Engineer friend of mine managed this, right above a socket. ;)

Electric/metal detector is your friend!
 

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