Dolby Atmos placement or Klipsch recommend placement

Jackiechen1121

Novice Member
Hi everyone,


First time setting up my home theatre system, 7.2.4
Followed all Dolby Atmos installation guide got all floor speaker setup at 60 degree between each speaker.

Installing the ceiling speaker and found that the Klipsch manual it say placement of 20° but Dolby recommend 35-55° ( I plan to do it on 45)
Which should I go for?
Green circle is what Klipsch recommended placement, Yellow is from Dolby.
Since its a ceiling speaker, I am not sure if there is a method where I could just hook up and try it out first other than cut and install.


The room is
19.67x15.8 feet
8.85height


AVR
Denon AVCX8500

Speaker
Front Klipsch RP-8000F
Centre Klipsch RP504C
Surround - Klipsch RP502s
Back Surround - Klipsch RP502s
Ceiling - DS180CDT
 

Attachments

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Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
45 degrees is where I'd put them too, and depending on where the Atmos speakers end up with respect to the seats, I would tend to follow the commercial guidelines and place them midway between the left and centre, and right and centre rather than inline with the L&R, so they would line up more with where you have the back surrounds. That's because my left and right are effectively in the corners so the Atmos speakers end up close to the wall and give the impression of sounds moving up and down the wall, rather than overhead. By moving them closer to the seats, the effects appear to be more overhead and in the room than on the walls now. That might not be the case for you, but just something you might want to consider for the ceiling speakers if you feel they're closer to the walls than the seating. Also make sure they're aimed at the seats like all the other speakers are, and not firing down into the floor if you leave them as shown in the diagram.
 

Jackiechen1121

Novice Member
45 degrees is where I'd put them too, and depending on where the Atmos speakers end up with respect to the seats, I would tend to follow the commercial guidelines and place them midway between the left and centre, and right and centre rather than inline with the L&R, so they would line up more with where you have the back surrounds. That's because my left and right are effectively in the corners so the Atmos speakers end up close to the wall and give the impression of sounds moving up and down the wall, rather than overhead. By moving them closer to the seats, the effects appear to be more overhead and in the room than on the walls now. That might not be the case for you, but just something you might want to consider for the ceiling speakers if you feel they're closer to the walls than the seating. Also make sure they're aimed at the seats like all the other speakers are, and not firing down into the floor if you leave them as shown in the diagram.
Klipsch manual didn't mention anything about what angle can the tweeter tilt, that's main reason I look at the manual and found out that they recommended 20degree placement.
I been thinking that's probably the reason they recommended 20degree placement simply because the tweeter can only tilt 20degree? In the manual it didn't mention what angle can the tweeter tilt to

updated the photo with ceiling placement dimension.
 

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Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
So the 20 degrees is just related to the tweeters range of motion which makes sense. Place the speaker at around 45 degrees, and angle the tweeter towards the listening position. If you can get some angled spacers to point the entire speaker towards the listening position, that will help a little more.
 

Jackiechen1121

Novice Member
45 degrees is where I'd put them too, and depending on where the Atmos speakers end up with respect to the seats, I would tend to follow the commercial guidelines and place them midway between the left and centre, and right and centre rather than inline with the L&R, so they would line up more with where you have the back surrounds. That's because my left and right are effectively in the corners so the Atmos speakers end up close to the wall and give the impression of sounds moving up and down the wall, rather than overhead. By moving them closer to the seats, the effects appear to be more overhead and in the room than on the walls now. That might not be the case for you, but just something you might want to consider for the ceiling speakers if you feel they're closer to the walls than the seating. Also make sure they're aimed at the seats like all the other speakers are, and not firing down into the floor if you leave them as shown in the diagram.
I am with you with the ceiling placement, I do think that somehow the ceiling placement on Dolby atmos to inline with the front speaker doesn't make sense.
I am more towards the distance from ear position to ceiling and use it as a Radius then 45degree from that radius, show attached.
 

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Praetorpwj

Active Member
Personally I wouldn’t go with either to the letter as it should be based around your actual room width and ceiling height.

Dolby guidelines show Atmos speakers in line with L&R but logically if you have a high ceiling the off axis angle is smaller than for lower ceilings. Go with a constant off axis angle based on actual height.

Atmos angles for .4 systems appear to be calculated forward and rear of the line of the MLP rather than the point of the listener which tends to increase the actual off axis angles.

Like base level speakers you want to minimise angle gaps to maximise immersion. .4 Atmos at 45 degs off axis front and rear of MLP means a 90+ deg gap. Personally I would go with around 35 degs off axis front to rear and side to side and angled in towards MLP so there is a max 70 deg angle. For an average ceiling height this would bring the positions closer together between L&R.
 

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