Does splitting aerial for two TVs lose much signal strength?

BM08

Well-known Member
As title, we are having a new aerial fitted soon and the guy said he could fit a splitter for the bedroom tv aswell, only thing is, I don’t want to compromise the signal strength/quality for the main tv in the lounge, as that’s where we do the bulk of our tv watching, we only use the upstairs one a handful of times a year probably. If it’s going to compromise the main tv in anyway shape or form, I’d rather not have it split for two TVs.

Any advice folks?
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
As title, we are having a new aerial fitted soon and the guy said he could fit a splitter for the bedroom tv aswell, only thing is, I don’t want to compromise the signal strength/quality for the main tv in the lounge, as that’s where we do the bulk of our tv watching, we only use the upstairs one a handful of times a year probably. If it’s going to compromise the main tv in anyway shape or form, I’d rather not have it split for two TVs.

Any advice folks?

Splitting reduces the signal strength but unless you have a very weak signal it has no effect on the picture quality.

See

Television Aerial Boosters / Amplifiers, Splitters, Diplexers & Triplexers
 

Rodders53

Distinguished Member
A passive splitter reduces the signal by 4dB - a tad over half.

An active splitter aka distribution amplifier will actually increase the signal level and add a small amount of noise at the same time, but will allow longer cable run losses to be taken into account as well as feeding more outlets without issue. Such amplifiers are best near the aerial and can be fed power via the aerial cables.

BUT an aerial installer should use a meter to ensure his correct choice of aerial (gain) and splitter/ cable loss calculations are correct. Each outlet should be between 45 and 65 dB (ref 1 microVolt) and nearer top figure ideally.
 

carpman0401

Active Member
I used a Labgear tv aerial splitter from Screwfix direct to feed each of my 3 oled TVs. Absolutely no problems whatsoever. 2 of the TVs are downstairs and the other in the front/main bedroom. Was less than a tenner I think if memory serves. Crystal clear picture on each of the TVs through the splitter aerial. Hope this helps in choosing what to do , regards, Mike.
 

BM08

Well-known Member
I used a Labgear tv aerial splitter from Screwfix direct to feed each of my 3 oled TVs. Absolutely no problems whatsoever. 2 of the TVs are downstairs and the other in the front/main bedroom. Was less than a tenner I think if memory serves. Crystal clear picture on each of the TVs through the splitter aerial. Hope this helps in choosing what to do , regards, Mike.

I guess you have a strong signal with no tall buildings or trees near by? We have, but I guess the installer will be able to tell me if the signal is strong enough to be using a splitter.
 

carpman0401

Active Member
Yeah it’s a fairly strong signal with no trees or tall buildings around.
 

TJT1

Distinguished Member
Problem with just sticking an amplifier in in a strong signal area, is that you can end up with too large a signal which will overload the tuner and completely destroy the picture. (strength = zero, quality = zero)
AAMOI, if you have a picture without 'blocking', then increasing the signal level will not improve the picture quality. Once you have a stable picture, that's as good as it gets with digital TV. And that's regardless of what it says in that amp description. It may 'get you' a picture, but it won't 'improve' it.
 

Rodders53

Distinguished Member
OP is getting a professional aerial installer (RDI or CAI member perhaps?) to install a new aerial.

That professional ought to have test aerial(s) and metering (possibly even spectrum analyser type) to determine the needed aerial and any amplification needed at the location concerned. {Although a local installer may have a pretty good idea before visiting site.}

Advice on amplified splitters is premature. The professional can better advise than we, at a distance, ever can!

OP might like to check out the predicted reception at the location via the 'detailed view' of DiUK
Also reading the website of ATV aerials would be worthwhile.
Finally, if the installer offers an aerial with a pressed rectangular plate reflector refuse it! (See the contract aerial section.) Broadcasters use log periodic designs most often for good reasons.
 

TJT1

Distinguished Member
Finally, if the installer offers an aerial with a pressed rectangular plate reflector refuse it!
C'mon Rodders, he's a 'professional aerial installer', he wouldn't fit a contract aerial, would he? (rising inflection on the last two words):rotfl:
 
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BM08

Well-known Member
OP is getting a professional aerial installer (RDI or CAI member perhaps?) to install a new aerial.

That professional ought to have test aerial(s) and metering (possibly even spectrum analyser type) to determine the needed aerial and any amplification needed at the location concerned. {Although a local installer may have a pretty good idea before visiting site.}

Advice on amplified splitters is premature. The professional can better advise than we, at a distance, ever can!

OP might like to check out the predicted reception at the location via the 'detailed view' of DiUK
Also reading the website of ATV aerials would be worthwhile.
Finally, if the installer offers an aerial with a pressed rectangular plate reflector refuse it! (See the contract aerial section.) Broadcasters use log periodic designs most often for good reasons.

Yes professional installers and CAI member. They got kitted our vans, testers and test aerial which he showed me.

How much would you say it should cost? He’s going right on top of the roof to install it, and it’ll be fitted to a 6 foot pole that’s already up there.
 

Rodders53

Distinguished Member
How much would you say it should cost?
How long is a piece of string?

Location will determine price most (Central London costs more than rural Norfolk).

Costs should be quoted / estimated / given and accepted before starting the job, though!
You maybe ought to get more than one estimate/quote?

Site visit call out / reception survey cost.
Aerial (aka antenna) cost.
Splitter and cables (passive / amplified) costs.
Labour to fit/install and test cost.
Possible new pole/fixings (depending on condition of existing).

Some of those you can estimate from the ATV aerials shop prices? Then guess how long it will take at ?£40/£50/£60 per hour or maybe more?
 

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