Do you think public service workers should strike?

Do you agree with the public sector strikes?

  • Yes they should strike

    Votes: 66 32.4%
  • No they shouldn't strike

    Votes: 127 62.3%
  • No opinion / Unsure

    Votes: 11 5.4%

  • Total voters
    204

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
What are peoples opinions on the public sector strikes? Are you backing them or do you think they shouldn't be striking?

I'm behind them all the way, people I know who are going to be affected are getting completely shafted and will be expected to work a lot longer, paying much higher contributions and at the same time they will lose a huge chunk of their pension when they retire.

I can understand maybe new workers under new contracts being affected but to change peoples pensions who have maybe been working 20-30+ years already is not on in my opinion. From speaking to a few of them many don't mind paying a bit more into their pensions every month, but to pay more and get a lot less than they were expecting is causing a lot of anger so I can understand where they are coming from.

So what do others think?
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
No. Times are tough. Everyone is taking cuts.
 

craig1912

Well-known Member
No every one is suffering. My pension has been cut like most private companies- why should I (as a tax payer) continue to fund their pensions which are quite clearly unsustainable.
 

Hitby

Well-known Member
I'm (sort of) public sector and I think it's ridiculous. Even with the changes to the schemes the pensions are still loads better than what's available to the private sector.
 

tonyrees687

Well-known Member
I am 20 years away from a pension . I wont be striking. Going to work tomorrow to look after my patients If I dont work then I dont get patients,loads of things are going to happen just pleased to have a job and do the right thing
 

Dave

Distinguished Member
While I don't particularly support industrial action on the issue I can understand why it's being done.

The pension issue should have been sorted years ago but now we are in a position where public sector workers get a triple whammy, work longer, pay more, get less. I know the pension is generous when compared to most private schemes but we shouldn't be looking to knock everyone to the lowest common denominator.

When I joined the public sector I joined with the expectation of doing 35 years service to get full pension and for that I pay 9.5% of my salary IIRC. That's now going to rise to 11.5 or 12%. How many people in the private sector pay that much in to a pension scheme? I'm also now being told it's possibly career average rather than final salary and I may not even get it till I'm at least 65.

I know the private sector has had it tough in regards to pensions but it's still a smack in the mouth. I took a considerable pay cut to join the public sector (my choice before someone helpfully points that out) and the pension terms helped offset that considerably. They don't anymore and perhaps in future more people will consider their options before moving to the public sector.
 

adamdodsworth

Active Member
craig1912 said:
No every one is suffering. My pension has been cut like most private companies- why should I (as a tax payer) continue to fund their pensions which are quite clearly unsustainable.
It is worth noting that not all public sector pension schemes are running at a deficit. Some have managed the whole situation correctly and have enough to be sustainable (from contributions, assets and investments), yet are still being asked to introduce the new measures which means members will pay more for less as it suits central govt.
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
I'm (sort of) public sector and I think it's ridiculous. Even with the changes to the schemes the pensions are still loads better than what's available to the private sector.
Yes they may be but that isn't the point of the strike. Can you imagine working for 20-30 years, expecting a certain pension when you retire and planning for that, and then being told you have to work a lot longer, pay a load more money and get a lot less in the process.

I understand the country is in trouble but to shaft people, who in most cases do not earn a great deal to start with, is wrong.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
When I joined the public sector I joined with the expectation of doing 35 years service to get full pension and for that I pay 9.5% of my salary IIRC. That's now going to rise to 11.5 or 12%. How many people in the private sector pay that much in to a pension scheme?
Personally I have always paid a larger % than that, but into more transparent schemes.

30-40 years is a hell of a long time to hope a particular deal stays in place IMO.
 

Hitby

Well-known Member
I can imagine it as it happens. As I said, I'm public sector. Both my wife and myself fall under the new rules. I still won't be striking as I'm aware the money has to come from somewhere (the private sector) and I'm also aware of what state their pensions are in.
 

tonyrees687

Well-known Member
Personally I have always paid a larger % than that, but into more transparent schemes.

30-40 years is a hell of a long time to hope a particular deal stays in place IMO.
Totally agree like I have said got 20 years to go yet. Things will change big time
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
30-40 years is a hell of a long time to hope a particular deal stays in place IMO.
Even if your contract stipulated what your pension was? The government are looking to effectively break everyones contract and rewrite it. Would you be happy if your employer changed your contract and gave you a pay cut or made changes that dramatically effects your retirement plans? That's the point, its the principle of the matter and once again stinging some of the poorest paid workers in the country and a time when people earning over £150,000 are arguing they shouldn't be paying 50% tax, doesn't seem fair to me.
 

lynx

Well-known Member
I fully support the action.

In solidarity.
 

tonyrees687

Well-known Member
Even if your contract stipulated what your pension was? The government are looking to effectively break everyones contract and rewrite it. Would you be happy if your employer changed your contract and gave you a pay cut or made changes that dramatically effects your retirement plans? That's the point, its the principle of the matter and once again stinging some of the poorest paid workers in the country and a time when people earning over £150,000 are arguing they shouldn't be paying 50% tax, doesn't seem fair to me.
Would you be happy if your employer changed your contract and gave you a pay cut or made changes that dramatically effects your retirement plans? This has happened to me with the agenda to change in the nhs.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Even if your contract stipulated what your pension was?
[-]Not sure what this means.[/-] Sorry - re-read. Everyone has to give something to keep things on track - >everyone< (pretty much) is feeling the pinch.

Would you be happy if your employer changed your contract and gave you a pay cut
They just did that - I wasn't 'happy' but I took it due to being unable to get a better deal somewhere else, and/or not wanting to try in this climate.
 
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tonyrees687

Well-known Member
Me to I f i didnt like it then I would have to look for another job
 

la gran siete

Distinguished Member
Yes i do believe they should strike and send a strong message to this government
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
I don't know if anyone else has raised the issue of Call Me Dave's position on the ballot turnout? Apparently he considers that the NUT have no mandate to strike due to a minority of members actually casting a vote in favour of it. I'm all in favour of this position as long as we apply the same principle to all voting. After all, if the NUT have no mandate with some 35% it hardly seems fair to allow someone to run the country with only 22%...
 
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imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Where was this post? Was it a problem of low turnout - but only the 'yes' voters voting?
 

CooperUK

Well-known Member
I'm a teacher....I work several hours per day above and beyond my contracted hours.

My results for GCSE are way above my targets.

I run trips and various other things so that people's children can have good experiences of education and life.

I have no debts and did not contribute to the mess in the economy.

I will be on strike. Not because I am militant, but because teachers are also meant to teach things such as principles to their students; the willingness to stand up for oneself and believe in something.

Oh...and by the way...I pay taxes too...so I pay into my pension through contributions and via my taxes. I pay TWICE for my pension and am now being asked to pay more.

That extra contribution will mean teachers will have less money, will worry more about their finances, will be less motivated, as it is in effect a pay cut.
 

tonyrees687

Well-known Member
Its not going to change anything. I wish it would. More work on Thursday thats all
 

craig1912

Well-known Member
Even if your contract stipulated what your pension was? The government are looking to effectively break everyones contract and rewrite it. Would you be happy if your employer changed your contract and gave you a pay cut or made changes that dramatically effects your retirement plans? That's the point, its the principle of the matter and once again stinging some of the poorest paid workers in the country and a time when people earning over £150,000 are arguing they shouldn't be paying 50% tax, doesn't seem fair to me.
Happens all the time in the private sector. I've been with the same employer for 21 years. Four years ago I had to start contributing and accept a lower accrual rate. Last year the stopped the final salary scheme and introduced a money purchase. Its not breaking a contract its changing it.
 

Ruperts slippers

Distinguished Member
I support the workers right to strike ,but having recieved my partners final pension figures ,and discussing them with my accoutant we both feel its still an excellent deal,a big lump sum,and an decent amount every week...

In the construction industry you get sweet fa,and a job which leaves you potentially crippled in your fifties....

Although potential self employed earnings are massive...
 

GBDG1

Distinguished Member
I'm in two minds.

I think that people are very quick to forget what things were like before the unions existed. People worked 6 days a week, 12 - 14 hours, were fined and beaten at work.

Clearly things have come a long way since then, but I think that the unions play an important part in providing a good working environment for people who want to work. Do we really want similar working rights to China or India - because that is what happens if you have no worker power at all.

At the same time I don't have an opinion either way on this particular issue. I can see why the public sector workers are striking.
 

craig1912

Well-known Member
It is worth noting that not all public sector pension schemes are running at a deficit. Some have managed the whole situation correctly and have enough to be sustainable (from contributions, assets and investments), yet are still being asked to introduce the new measures which means members will pay more for less as it suits central govt.
If thats the case then fair enough but the vast majority of schemes both public and private are/have been underfunded as a result of poor investment conditions and also Labour government tax intervention in the past.
 

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