Do you recommend(or currently run) Intel & Nvidia build or an AMD build for VR gaming?

Do you recommend or currently run a Intel / Nvidia OR AMD build for your high fidelity VR ?


  • Total voters
    15
  • This poll will close: .

CJ90000

Active Member
For those of you running a high spec pc for high fidelity VR did you go AMD or Intel/Nvidia? Trying to decide what to go with for a very high spec new pc build. Its a bit harder to find which is better to go with than for flat screen gaming.
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
AMD for the CPU
Nvidia for the GPU (which you won't get at the moment anyway, from Nvidia or AMD)
 

KingD

Active Member
I'm currently running AMD 5600x and Nvidia 3060ti, works well for my budget no complaints on VR either 👍
 

richardb70

Distinguished Member
I'm not sure why Intel is in the "Unlimited Power" option :). AMD has the fastest gaming CPUs, I thought?

Anyway, agree with Delvey. AMD CPU, Nvidia GPU.
 

CJ90000

Active Member
I'm not sure why Intel is in the "Unlimited Power" option :). AMD has the fastest gaming CPUs, I thought?

mainly because the AMD cpu/gpu combo is generally less power demanding
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
mainly because the AMD cpu/gpu combo is generally less power demanding
Less power demanding? Yes.
Better performance, also yes (at least with the CPU)
 

richardb70

Distinguished Member
I'm not sure why Intel is in the "Unlimited Power" option :). AMD has the fastest gaming CPUs, I thought?

mainly because the AMD cpu/gpu combo is generally less power demanding

Ah gotcha! I assumed you meant processing power, not "power from the socket".
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
Better performance per buck yep! :smashin: But better performance in VR overall? ;)
I've not seen any benchmarks comparing CPUs but considering it is a GPU intensive task then AMD as they are still the best performance for gaming for the price
 

SeaFirelIV

Active Member
I have AMD. But previously had Intel, and before that had AMD and before that had Intel.

My reasons? Well, AMD do good stuff and you can make decent builds with them. They're also quite cost effective compared to Intel.

However, every now and then Intel gets quite cost effective too and their stuff has an edge in performance. So you see, I go for what's best for the price. I will switch as I see how things go.

But AMD is definitely good if price is important.
 

PodJim

Active Member
I have a Ryzon 5 CPU and Nvidia RTX 2060. It's the first time I've went with AMD. I know they're supposed to run hot but I've got plenty of case fans. I've been impressed with the performance/price. I can't get a 30 series at the moment but I will when they're more available.
 

MikeKay1976

Distinguished Member
Zen3 5800x and rtx 3090FE

Fantastic combo and if anything can run it, this can run it. I would not reccomend a 3090 to anyone for gaming however if you could get a 3080 at RRP for 40% of the price.
 

SeaFirelIV

Active Member
Zen3 5800x and rtx 3090FE

Fantastic combo and if anything can run it, this can run it. I would not reccomend a 3090 to anyone for gaming however if you could get a 3080 at RRP for 40% of the price.
Can't justify a 3090, but I'm considering a 3080 or 70 ... eventually.
 

oneman

Active Member
Zen 3 5800x with 1080Ti, wanting to get RTX 3080 but not paying silly money scalpers are changing. 1080Ti is fast enough for 1440 monitor and rift CV1
 

bilbosmeggins

Distinguished Member
AMD 5950X alongside an RTX3090 and it’s still not enough 😂. I think, when it comes to VR, the software needs to catch up with the hardware.
 

bilbosmeggins

Distinguished Member
That would be a start. But, the big problem with modern programmers, is that they are spoilt with the amount of RAM, and onboard storage at their disposal. Alongside blisteringly fast CPU’s and GPU’s. They no longer code with discipline like back in the day, when games designers were constricted by 16 or 48K or so 😳. Those guys worked miracles. Today’s guys couldn’t give you a high score table with that little memory, let alone a full-blown game. If you get a patch to rectify the slightest sound glitch these days, it can run into 100’s of megabytes 😲
 

oneman

Active Member
That would be a start. But, the big problem with modern programmers, is that they are spoilt with the amount of RAM, and onboard storage at their disposal. Alongside blisteringly fast CPU’s and GPU’s. They no longer code with discipline like back in the day, when games designers were constricted by 16 or 48K or so 😳. Those guys worked miracles. Today’s guys couldn’t give you a high score table with that little memory, let alone a full-blown game. If you get a patch to rectify the slightest sound glitch these days, it can run into 100’s of megabytes 😲
I am sure you know that most of the development is done with toolkits, its just not possible to code from scratch. And even with hundreds of people it can take years of development for a single game.

And no the developers don't assume everyone has a high end machine which is why they offer different quality settings so games can be run on lower spec hardware.
 

MikeKay1976

Distinguished Member
I am sure you know that most of the development is done with toolkits, its just not possible to code from scratch. And even with hundreds of people it can take years of development for a single game.

And no the developers don't assume everyone has a high end machine which is why they offer different quality settings so games can be run on lower spec hardware.
This may be true but bilbosmeggins is also correct. Some games on PC are incredibly well optimised but others ARE awful, you only have to compare what the potato consoles could put out compared to the PC counter parts.

GTAIV was a prime example. run awfully badly on my v high end machine and yet also run just as well on an xbox 360 with half a gb of ram.

yes some of that may be down to background apps which pcs have but imo games are not as optimised as they could be and certainly not as well as they used to be.

actually this may get better going forward given modern consoles are essentialy mid range pcs (even the OS of the xbox is v similar) so for multiformats it should be easier now than ever before to have well optimised pc ports, but we are still at the mercy of the devs making the most of the extra HP of a good gaming pc.
 
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Atmos

Well-known Member
That would be a start. But, the big problem with modern programmers, is that they are spoilt with the amount of RAM, and onboard storage at their disposal. Alongside blisteringly fast CPU’s and GPU’s. They no longer code with discipline like back in the day, when games designers were constricted by 16 or 48K or so 😳. Those guys worked miracles. Today’s guys couldn’t give you a high score table with that little memory, let alone a full-blown game. If you get a patch to rectify the slightest sound glitch these days, it can run into 100’s of megabytes 😲
The reality is VR needs 2 displays. That’s double the rendering. Even if you found a Dev that was so smart they could reduce rendering by half they wound apply that same technique to the pancake games to double the FPS. With double the fps/performance they could increase poly count/texture size and then you’re back to square one where pancake games look twice as good as VR games for the same fps.

Once VR hits retina resolution over the fovea VR will then have the advantage over monitors because render performance will not increase unleashing wide FOV HMDs with not performance cost.
 

SeaFirelIV

Active Member
They no longer code with discipline like back in the day, when games designers were constricted by 16 or 48K or so 😳. Those guys worked miracles. Today’s guys couldn’t give you a high score table with that little memory, let alone a full-blown game. If you get a patch to rectify the slightest sound glitch these days, it can run into 100’s of megabytes 😲
Totally in agreement with you there.
 

bilbosmeggins

Distinguished Member
I am sure you know that most of the development is done with toolkits, its just not possible to code from scratch. And even with hundreds of people it can take years of development for a single game.

And no the developers don't assume everyone has a high end machine which is why they offer different quality settings so games can be run on lower spec hardware.

I never insinuated that they assume high-end or otherwise. What I’m saying, is that the average system is vastly more capable than the machines of yester-yore. And coding hasn’t needed to develop alongside current technology, because the hardware is usually sufficient to plug any shortcomings.

I’m old enough to remember the transition from the old, 8-bit machines, to the all dancing, all singing Commodore Amiga (and Atari ST’s cough). And the biggest thing that struck me was how programmers had suddenly gone from the tight constraints of a game that had to be loaded into the smallest of machines in a single load, to something vastly more capable, with comparitively massive storage. And what happened? The coders suddenly realised that they could get sloppy, and lazy, and disk-swapping became the norm. Games that were nothing special would suddenly need 7 or 8 disks. That mindset has continued.
 

oneman

Active Member
Coders haven't got sloppy or lazy, coding, , it a completely different skill then it was 40 years ago. This is my experience from when I started doing assembly language on a ZX81 and these days I focus more on design rather than doing the coding but I know a lot of coders. Why would I care about how a coding a high score table when there is a library for that, I focus my efforts on other aspects. The library may not be the most efficient but its flexible and runs on different platforms, etc so sure overall the code is going to need more resources.

If we still tried to code in assembly then nothing would ever get produced.
 

bilbosmeggins

Distinguished Member
The reality is VR needs 2 displays. That’s double the rendering. Even if you found a Dev that was so smart they could reduce rendering by half they wound apply that same technique to the pancake games to double the FPS. With double the fps/performance they could increase poly count/texture size and then you’re back to square one where pancake games look twice as good as VR games for the same fps.

Once VR hits retina resolution over the fovea VR will then have the advantage over monitors because render performance will not increase unleashing wide FOV HMDs with not performance cost.
Yes, I realise that VR charges the hardware double. But even taking VR out of the equation completely, current software capability is nowhere near current hardware. Supposing PC’s, and all of their architecture, were frozen in time, much like consoles are for their 6-year run, I can guarantee that the software at the end of the cycle would be considerably better than at the start. You see it time and again with consoles. Programmers have to learn how to wring the most out of the hardware, because they can’t rely on faster memory, or the god of all GPU’s to suddenly appear to bail them out.

Games like The Last Of Us came out right at the end of the PS3’s life span. There was nothing even close to that calibre of game when the console was first launched. A constant wave of ever-evolving hardware does tend to mitigate the need for efficiency.
 

MikeKay1976

Distinguished Member
you can even use VR for that example as well. I admit i have not used psvr much however I was blown away by the shark cage demo thing as well as the heist thing... and that was on a vanilla ps4. sure the tracking was janky (even the head tracking, luckily i didnt have to do much with the controller tracking ) but from a visual tech and performance POV I do not know what sorcery they pulled off but it as incredible considering the hardware.
 

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