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Do letter box format films cause screen burn?

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by giantteabag, Nov 2, 2004.

  1. giantteabag

    giantteabag
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    After running a forum search on screen burn, I understand that a less illuminated part of the screen will fade slower than a frequently illuminated bit.
    Hence 4:3 is a big no no.

    So will watching loads of DVD's & SKY Movies which are in widescreen & often do not fill the whole plasma screen, cause the same problem?
    Do you veteran plasma owners have slight shadowing in bands at top/btm of screen?
    Cheers.
     
  2. LV426

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    Theoretically yes. In practice, as visible screen burn is a function of brightness x duration, then, unless you happen to use your screen exclusively for such material - for a long long time - at high brightness levels - with an unusually bright image content overall - etc - then your own boredom or upgradeitis will probably beat screen burn as a motive for replacing the set.
     
  3. giantteabag

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    Thanks Nigel.
    So if my pw7 is set at 'normal', with wobble & peak limit on, & the family views circa 6 hours of content per night, of which 3 hours is in letter box format , then I have nothing to worry about?

    Upgradeitus is a problem for me, so says she who must be obeyed.
    HD broadcast by sky with no extra cost will be my excuse to feed that habit!
     
  4. LV426

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    Hard to be sure. But probably no worries. Experience suggests that recent upmarket brands (such as yours) have more long-lived phosphors than earlier and/or cheaper items.
     
  5. Liam @ Prog AV

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    I'd be more careful than you think Nigel. Many of my Pioneer customers (having not listened to my advice after we install!!) now suffer from letterbox burn on their plasmas. It is minor and most are saved early on with a bashing of white, but it is very much a risk early on in the plasma life... one customer in particular unfortunately now has a slight, but permanent, shadow at top and bottom.
     
  6. LV426

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    Oh, I agree totally. It's hard to strike the right balance between screen burn paranoia and the real-world. I'm an LCD user myself so it ain't an issue. Your fellow retailer MAW has (unless I'm misrepresenting him, in which case I unreservedly apologise) commented elsewhere that usage patterns need to be pretty severe to get visible artefacts of screen burn on modern upmarket Plasmas. Only experience will tell. giantteabag seems to be doing pretty well everything it's in his power to do, to limit the damage.
     
  7. Liam @ Prog AV

    Liam @ Prog AV
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    Yes I think the difference between what me and Maw have said is once the screen is settled and running, versus it in brand new condition. Once settled image retention is practically a non-issue, but new (and esp Pioneer) it is a high risk thing. The Pioneer HDE will usually retain the Home Menu on the screen for about 10 minutes after you've finished using it on initial setup!!!!
     
  8. giantteabag

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    Great info guys...for my first 200 hours I'm using zoom to fill the screen whenever letter box happens. It makes crap viewing for films but it's worth it in the long run.
    Cheers.
     
  9. kriswood5

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    Guys

    Is it really necessary to zoom in on DVD to avoid the letter box? I got my Viera last week and have turned down the colour/brightness/contrast as advised and have turned dynamic mode off. I watched my first DVD on sat and had the letter box on throughout the 100 mins. Is this likely to cause a problem (over paranoid) or as long as I watch other programs in non letter box mode then this should be ok?

    Thanks
     
  10. LV426

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    There's nothing absolute that can lead to an accurate answer to the question. In absolute theory, as above, any part of the screen that is illuminated more brightly than another will age (and hence dim) more quickly than another area that isn't.

    Relative brightness x duration.

    Also affected by the durabilty of the phosphors, and occurs more rapidly during the early part of the screen's life.

    Beyond that, there isn't an absolute answer.
     
  11. sunderland

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    so is it really about 200 hours before you can really turn everything up. as ive got my viera set to normal and like it. but i want to start to mess around with the picture. but am a bit scared as ive heard people say leave it at low settings till it is run in. thanks
     
  12. Ekko Star

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    Call me paranoid but as nigel has said, anything static such as logos or black bars will eventually with prolonged use cause burn-in.

    I always rotate my image through use of zooms during any film of 2-3hrs.

    You can call me paranoid...I call it good practice. :)
     
  13. sunderland

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    i understand ekko star. but there must be a time limit on how long you have to do that for. you cant keep doing it all of the plasmas life. well i hope not.cheers
     
  14. kriswood5

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    Rotating images seems to defeat the object of having a great home cinema set up. If this is the advice then i will follow it but it seems a bit crap to have to zoom in an image during a film when you are actually trying to enjoy the film as it was meant to be viewed and heard!
     
  15. Ekko Star

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    That's not my advice to you, it's only what I do myself.

    If you watch that sort of material infrequently I would guess with a well seasoned screen it would hardly make any difference.

    I have a fairly extensive DVD library so I take extra precaution as a consequence.

    TBH if we were all into watching a movie as it is meant to be seen and heard then we'd all be round George Lucas's for tea every night ! There's only so much you can do !
     
  16. LV426

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    I don't really know how many different ways there are, to say "there isn't a definite answer".

    The fact of it is, that displaying anything uneven on the screen (eg a logo, a letterboxed film....anything) causes uneven dimming/ageing. Even after 30 seconds. However it's also true that the uneven dimming of the screen after 30 seconds' use will be wholly imperceptible to the human eye.

    At some (undefined) point it becomes perceptible and that's when you have visible screen burn. This point is determined by:

    How bright, compared to the rest
    For how long
    How resilient the phosphors used in the screen are
    How good your eyesight is

    Yes, working around it (by whatever technique) is inconvenient, and for the most part it may well be unnecessary.

    The only 100% certain way to avoid uneven screen ageing is to use a technology that doesn't suffer from it - LCD for example.
     
  17. Ekko Star

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    Your point is fully taken on board. :)

    Still, I feel that whatever the brightness settings the contrast between the black borders and the visible picture will eventually cause a visible line. Simply because the burn occuring there is the difference between a black and effectively a white. I would guess this would be the most easily apparent type of burn.

    I believe this is why on the Viera, and some Toshiba's if you go into 4:3 mode, the panel displays the borders in a very light grey. The burn is still happening but the differnec between light grey and effectively white is not so stark and apparent. If that makes any sense ???

    Logos tend to be of colour, some are opaque type, but your right they can of course cause burn-in as well.

    There is no right or wrong answer, just depends on your viewing habits.
     
  18. samhain

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    I suspect the desire to upgrade to higher resolutions could mean that a screen is obsolete before it starts to fail.
     
  19. kriswood5

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    Points taken. I suspect that with my varied use between sky and DVD I should not worry too much but be aware of the issues and cautious where necessary.

    Thanks for your comments
     

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