Do I need to upgrade my AV receiver and speakers?

MarbleTime

Novice Member
So currently have a Panasonic TXP50GT30b TV, Yamaha RXV377 AVR and Tannoy SFX5.1 speakers. Currently the AVR is connected to the TV and everything else connected to the AVR.

Upgrading the TV to hopefully LG OLED65BX. Mainly used for streaming movies and shows from Netlfix/Prime/NowTV/Disney Plus (currently via a Roku device which will become redundant as the LG TV will already have all the apps built-in). Sometimes play games via PS4/Steam Link/Switch but that's less than 10% usage, potentially in the future may get a PS5 and play that more.

My questions are:
1) Can I keep my current speakers and will they do the job or does the new TV have some new sound features I can only make use of with new speakers?
2) Do I need to upgrade my AVR? I know this AVR does not support 4k or HDR but the majority of the video will be through the TV apps itself so can I still just use the AVR and speakers for the audio?
3) For games, I would need a new AVR to enable 4K/HDR content or can I somehow connect to the TV for the video and AVR for the audio?

Thanks in advance!
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Depends on if you're happy with using the TV as a HDMI hub instead of an AV amp. Although the new TV will have eARC the old AV amp will still be limited to the old ARC format so will only be able to handle SD audio via the HMDI connection. Still workable if you are happy with SD audio. With that in mind and keeping the current AV amp there would be no reason to upgrade your speakers.

I would suggest though that you use a digital optical connection between the TV and the AV amp because it is inherently more stable than the old ARC connection.

If you wish to upgrade to the new generation of AV amp then that can be used as a fully working HDMI hub and you will benefit from a more stable eARC connection between TV and amp. In this case you could also consider upgrading the speakers providing the new amp is a step up or at least a side ways move from the current one. I would only upgrade the front three in the first instance and spend the majority of your budget on those speakers.
 

MarbleTime

Novice Member
Depends on if you're happy with using the TV as a HDMI hub instead of an AV amp. Although the new TV will have eARC the old AV amp will still be limited to the old ARC format so will only be able to handle SD audio via the HMDI connection. Still workable if you are happy with SD audio. With that in mind and keeping the current AV amp there would be no reason to upgrade your speakers.

I would suggest though that you use a digital optical connection between the TV and the AV amp because it is inherently more stable than the old ARC connection.

If you wish to upgrade to the new generation of AV amp then that can be used as a fully working HDMI hub and you will benefit from a more stable eARC connection between TV and amp. In this case you could also consider upgrading the speakers providing the new amp is a step up or at least a side ways move from the current one. I would only upgrade the front three in the first instance and spend the majority of your budget on those speakers.
Thanks for explaining. I am a bit confused about something.

What do you mean by SD audio ? Does that mean Dolby Digital and DTS?

My understanding is that the AVR supports Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital Plus, DTS-HD Master Audio, High Res Audio and Express. Are these the HD audio formats?

So if a Netflix show currently says Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 and I watch it with my current set-up which is a Roku connected via HDMI cable to the AVR and AVR connected with ARC HDMI to TV, am I not currently getting Dolby Digital Plus?

So if I upgrade the TV and keep my current AVR/speakers - I should still get the same sound quality I was getting before and still be able to make use of 5.1 surround?
 

rccarguy2

Well-known Member
Ignoring 4k and HDR pass through on the avr if you're happy with regular DD/DTS then that's ok....I'm still rocking with regular DD/dts on decent seperates system...
 

gibbsy

Moderator
What do you mean by SD audio ? Does that mean Dolby Digital and DTS?
SD is standard definition, ie, Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS. HD audio, which is what you would get from blu ray discs is Dolby TrueHD, along with Atmos and DTS-HD MA along with Neural:X. Streaming services have as a maximum Dolby Digital Plus which is still SD audio and you would not notice the difference between that and vanilla Dolby Digital.

If you have a blu ray player that has two HDMI out then one can be used for video only and connected via HDMI to the TV. The second used for HD audio can be connected to the AV amp. In essence the amp is still very usable, certainly if your only sources are SD audio and you have a blu ray player with dual outputs.
 

MarbleTime

Novice Member
Ignoring 4k and HDR pass through on the avr if you're happy with regular DD/DTS then that's ok....I'm still rocking with regular DD/dts on decent seperates system...

SD is standard definition, ie, Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS. HD audio, which is what you would get from blu ray discs is Dolby TrueHD, along with Atmos and DTS-HD MA along with Neural:X. Streaming services have as a maximum Dolby Digital Plus which is still SD audio and you would not notice the difference between that and vanilla Dolby Digital.

If you have a blu ray player that has two HDMI out then one can be used for video only and connected via HDMI to the TV. The second used for HD audio can be connected to the AV amp. In essence the amp is still very usable, certainly if your only sources are SD audio and you have a blu ray player with dual outputs.

Ok I see - thanks!
 

Mr Wolf

Well-known Member
Just to add something to the above, Dolby Digital Plus (DD+) is favoured by the streaming services providers because the codec offers more efficient data compression than traditional Dolby Digital (DD) so requires less bandwidth to do the same thing. Unlike DD, DD+ is capable of using much higher bitrates that, if used, is capable of delivering audio quality very similar to the HD formats (TrueHD etc).

A while ago Netflix said that they will be increasing their audio stream bitrates so, in theory, what we're getting from them should be improving (although I personally haven't noticed it).

Due to the above, given the option I would try and stream DD+ instead of DD wherever you can. Turning to your specific situation, DD+ cannot be sent to an AVR via an optical/Toslink connection, only via HDMI. I therefore suggest that you use the HDMI ARC output of your TV and feed this to the AVR if you're using your TV as the source device. Unlike @gibbsy I've never had any stability issues with ARC between my Samsung TV and my Denon AVR.
 

MarbleTime

Novice Member
Just to add something to the above, Dolby Digital Plus (DD+) is favoured by the streaming services providers because the codec offers more efficient data compression than traditional Dolby Digital (DD) so requires less bandwidth to do the same thing. Unlike DD, DD+ is capable of using much higher bitrates that, if used, is capable of delivering audio quality very similar to the HD formats (TrueHD etc).

A while ago Netflix said that they will be increasing their audio stream bitrates so, in theory, what we're getting from them should be improving (although I personally haven't noticed it).

Due to the above, given the option I would try and stream DD+ instead of DD wherever you can. Turning to your specific situation, DD+ cannot be sent to an AVR via an optical/Toslink connection, only via HDMI. I therefore suggest that you use the HDMI ARC output of your TV and feed this to the AVR if you're using your TV as the source device. Unlike @gibbsy I've never had any stability issues with ARC between my Samsung TV and my Denon AVR.
I see - thanks for taking the time to explain. I'll definitely continue with HDMI for now.
 

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