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Do I need AV in?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by statto, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. statto

    statto
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    Hi - naive question coming up.....

    I'm just about to purchase my first digital camcorder. Most of what I'll be doing is recording the kids/holidays sort of stuff, so I don't want millions of features (didn't use them on my old analogue recorder).

    What I do want to be able to do is edit footage on my PC and I understand that I can do that with suitable software having transferred the footage via firewire, and then burn it to DVD.

    Many camcorders seem to offer AV in as well, but one of those I'm particularly looking at (JVC GRD20) doesn't and one review says "once footage has been edited it cannot be recorded back to tape".

    Why would I want to do that? What's the point if I'm burning my OSCAR winning family archives to DVD?

    Any advice greatly appreciated. By the way, my shortlist so far is:

    Above mentioned JVC
    Sony TVR 33
    Panasonic NVDS65 or NGS50

    Thanks

    Statto
     
  2. Brian110507

    Brian110507
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    I'm wondering whether you are confusing AV-in and DV-in, two very different functions.
    AV-in will allow you to record your analogue signals from a VCR, a TV or your "old analogue camcorder" either to tape and then as digital to PC or if it has "pass through" which many have then you can convert old VHS and other analogue signals 'on the fly' to digital then to PC.
    DV-in which is becoming very common now allows you to record digital signals to the tape in your camera, The main reason you would want to do this is to archive your edited masterpiece, you will not be able to keep to many of them on your PC they are very big files - sure you put it on a DVD or two but first anything can happen to a DVD (one small scratch etc.) or second what if you decide to re-edit your masterpiece its very easy to reload from tape at full digital quality and rework but once it's on the DVD it is very compressed and will never be full quality again..

    If you have a choice between a camera with DV-in or not I would strongly suggest you go for DV-in, AV-in is not so important unless you have a lot of old material you want to update.
     
  3. statto

    statto
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    Indeed I did confuse AV with DV which is what I meant to put - I guess that's what comes of posting on the "AV Forums" LOL!

    Thanks for the advice. That narrows it down a bit.

    Statto:D
     
  4. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    A lot of people think that once you have copied you master piece to a DVD it will (subject to careful handling at least) last forever. This however is very unlikely to be the case as there is such a thing as DVD rot where the recorded DVD dye breaks up and the disk is then unreadable. Like with all things, the more you spend on the disks the less likely it is to happen and newer disks are becoming more reliable. The disks are still unlikely to last forever though, so having a full quality edit on a DV tape is a great way to recover the footage of your kids once they become 'annoying teenagers' :devil: . Oh how precious those memories will be then :D .

    Mark.
     
  5. statto

    statto
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    Thanks Mark
    Yes, I'd heard about the "finite life" of DVD (& CD) and general advice seems to be as you say - better known brands MAY last longer, but back up to whatever the current storage format is every 10 years or so.

    I suppose however, that the tape itself has a finite life span. My analogue tape collection (VHS-C) id gathering dust in the Hi-Fi cabinet which is possible not the ideal place to store them :D

    Statto
     

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