Do I need a DVD player that scales if I have a LCD?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Rob Sheep, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Rob Sheep

    Rob Sheep
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Messages:
    155
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Worcester
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi, I've a Toshiba 37"LCD, and I want to know if I connect a DVD player without an in built scaler via HDMI (eg Pioneer 668) am I going to see a great deal of difference in picture quality from a player that does- say scale to 720p, as the screen has its own scaler?

    Is there any point in scaling a already scaled image? :lease:
     
  2. Mark_a

    Mark_a
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    3,079
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +624
    It all comes down to the relative merits of the scalers used in both. One's bound to be better than the other, but unfortunately there's no certainty as to exactly which one it's going to be. Chances are pretty good, though, that a dedicated external scaler would most likely be better than either of them.

    Regards

    Mark
     
  3. Dune

    Dune
    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    267
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +16
    I just popped on here to ask a similar question to the thread title. Slightly different in that it is more general.

    There seems to be a lot of deabte about how high def LCD's handle SD images. Some say they are OK with DVD but when it comes to freeview or Sky they are awful.

    That has made me also wonder if you have an LCD do you need a scaler. But not just for DVD but for all your non-HD sources. The set top box, the DVD and even the old VCR.

    So the simple question is, will Freeeview (for example) look better on a HD LCD TV if you put the RGB output of the STB through a scaler?

    Dave
     
  4. Nic Rhodes

    Nic Rhodes
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2001
    Messages:
    17,152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Ratings:
    +1,276
    From my perspective there is little between scaling in DVD player and panels, personally I seem to nearly always prefer to scale in the panel. Proper video processors do offer many advantages however re quality and convenience however.
     
  5. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    26,909
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    The Borders
    Ratings:
    +3,126
    Hello all

    Rob Sheep - keep in mind too a Player with an inbuilt 'up-conversion' facility will only have limited output resolutions for you to choose from (480P, 576P, 720P and 1080i being the norm). If your LCD is not 1280x720 (which most aren't) then the up or down scaling in your LCD is still going to come into play.

    As Nick and Mark_a say the relative merits (or lack of) of one up-converter over another can really only be judged by watching a few video clips through the system and looking to see which option produces the least artefacts.

    Dune - if your LCD Display has the ability to accept 'Native Rate' Pixel for Pixel images at 50Hz and 60Hz then using a programmable external Video Processor to Scale, Deinterlace, Colour Balance your SD (and HD) signals makes a lot of sense.

    Even if you Display lacks the Pixel for Pixel option its definitely worth having a look at what an external Video Processor can offer you - often over sampling to something above the resolution of the Display and then letting the Display 'down-convert' works well.

    Best regards

    Joe
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice