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Do 110Ohm Balanced Digital Outputs use the S/PDIF Standard?

Discussion in 'Hi-Fi Stereo Systems & Separates' started by dynamic turtle, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. dynamic turtle

    dynamic turtle
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    AFAIK, SPDIF is 75Ohm only, so I'm guessing 110Ohm digital XLR uses a different standard. Is this the case?

    Always wondered.....
     
  2. Timbo21

    Timbo21
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    The standard for balanced 110 ohm digital XLR is AES as oppose to SPDIF.
     
  3. dynamic turtle

    dynamic turtle
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    Aha! And what, pray tell, does AES stand for? What are the relative benefits/pitfalls of this digital conversion standard relative to S/PDIF?

    DT
     
  4. Timbo21

    Timbo21
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    It stands for Aaahh, Eeehh, Shshshshaaa. In other words no idea. :)
    Maybe American Engineering Standard? I can find out if you really want to know.

    Aes is the professional digital format, as you probably know. Benefits are probably
    longer runs with less likelihood of drop of signal lock etc.
     
  5. _Cal_

    _Cal_
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    Incidentally, there are also people interested in Audio outside the US of A.

    AES stands for Audio Engineering Society. It's an international organization that promotes research, development, knowledge exchange and standard definition in the area od Audio.

    See more her: http://www.aes.org/
     
  6. Timbo21

    Timbo21
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    Alien Engineering Society :)
     
  7. dynamic turtle

    dynamic turtle
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    OK, answered part one of my question, thanks!

    So, part two; performance relative to SPDIF?

    I think this is a subject worth debating. Given the amount of time we spend fighting over cd/dac/dvd digital connections etc. I think we should explore the reasons for:

    a) The relative rarity of the AES as a connector option on most dvd/dac/cd seperates
    b) The benefits/pitfalls of this standard over SPDIF
    c) Why SPDIF was allowed to become the de-facto standard
    d) Why other digital standard or connectors have failed to make an impact (i.e. AT&T glass?)

    etc. etc.

    I think its worth exploring.....

    DT
     
  8. davehk

    davehk
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    AFAIK, AES and SPDIF data formats are broadly compatible - there are a few additional bits in the AES header that are ignored by SPDIF I think.

    The voltage levels used are also broadly compatible so that you can usually connect an SPFID output to an AES input OK (by linking the inverted side of the AES input to the screen of the SPDIF

    The main difference is that if you go AES to AES you get better noise immunity, which means that you can have longer cables and reject more interference before bit errors start to occur. But providing you are using reasonably short, good quality, well screened cable of the correct characteristic impedance with SPDIF, there should be no bit errors and the received data will be the same as that transmitted. Hence no effect on the sound.

    Since most domestic equipment uses very short cables, and consumers like cheap these days, it's not worth the manufacturer spending the extra money to put an AES interface on anything but the real high-end stuff.
     

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