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DNLA amp with Active Speakers?

missedthebus

Standard Member
Hi,

I am looking to buy a DNLA amp so that I can play music from my laptop / phone / etc through my existing speakers, as well as running my turntables through the same unit.

I currently have a set of turn tables (Numark TT200), a mixer, and some active speakers (Alesis M1 MKII). I am planning on replacing the mixer (not decided to what yet) and turntables (Technics 1210 MKII or MKIII) and then connecting the mixer into the DNLA amp and into the Active Speakers (self amplified)

Does anyone know if this kind of set up would work? Especially in terms of the active speakers? Would it blow the speakers?

Can anyone help / any suggestions or advice? If would work, any suggestions as to what amps to get?

Thanks,

Dom
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
You need an amp with pre outs. Not all AV receivers will include pre outs and this is something now reserved for the higher end models. You'd connect your speakers to the pre outs rather than the speaker terminals. You may be better looking at a pre amp rather than an integrated amp and using a media renderer attached to this rather than have DLNA networking built into the pre amp itself. You could use you current mixer plus turntable arrangement and simply add a Sonos or similar networking device to a spare input on the mixer. A mixer is effectively a pre amp.
 
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missedthebus

Standard Member
Okay, thanks!

Excuse my ignorance, but what kind of Sonos could I use?

I have been chatting about this to a friend who suggested getting a mini router to connect to the mixer's additional channel and then I could scrap the extra amp and use the speakers internal amps. Any thoughts on this? I this essentially a stripped down version of what your suggesting?

Do you also have any suggestions about mini routers (i.e. like a Sonos) that would work in this kind of setup?

Many thanks for your help.

Dom
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Okay, thanks!

Excuse my ignorance, but what kind of Sonos could I use?

I have been chatting about this to a friend who suggested getting a mini router to connect to the mixer's additional channel and then I could scrap the extra amp and use the speakers internal amps. Any thoughts on this? I this essentially a stripped down version of what your suggesting?

Do you also have any suggestions about mini routers (i.e. like a Sonos) that would work in this kind of setup?

Many thanks for your help.

Dom


You don't need a router. The Sonos is a network music player. The Sonos is connected to your home network through which it accesses the files and then plays them. The Sonos output the audio to the mixer or an amp in the same way any other component would be connected to such.

You'd probably be better with a Logitech Squeezebox touch rather than a Sonos, but you will need to hunt one down seeing as Logitech no longer manufacture them. This may also be of interest:
http://www.superfi.co.uk/p-9428-denon-dnp720ae-wireless-networked-media-player.aspx

There are other options, but many of them come at a premium price. You nned a network media player and not a router, although you will need a router to which to connect your player to over the network in order to fascilitate the player being able to access files over your network.

A router cannot play music or render audio files and is simply a device used for network switching and signal routing.

A router is a device that forwards data packets between computer networks, creating an overlay internetwork. A router is connected to two or more data lines from different networks. When a data packet comes in one of the lines, the router reads the address information in the packet to determine its ultimate destination. Then, using information in its routing table or routing policy, it directs the packet to the next network on its journey. Routers perform the "traffic directing" functions on the Internet. A data packet is typically forwarded from one router to another through the networks that constitute the internetwork until it reaches its destination node.[1]

The most familiar type of routers are home and small office routers that simply pass data, such as web pages, email, IM, and videos between the home computers and the Internet. An example of a router would be the owner's cable or DSL modem, which connects to the Internet through an ISP. More sophisticated routers, such as enterprise routers, connect large business or ISP networks up to the powerful core routers that forward data at high speed along the optical fiber lines of the Internet backbone. Though routers are typically dedicated hardware devices, use of software-based routers has grown increasingly common.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Router_(computing)
 
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