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DLP vs PLASMA vs LCD TEST - THIS SHOCKED ME!!

Discussion in 'TVs' started by Suave, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. Suave

    Suave
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    :lease:

    Hello All!

    I have been reading this DLP forum for some time now and for some reason, I am just attracted to DLP over Plasma & LCD - maybe it is down to cost as I would want the biggest screen I can get for the best price but with no compromise on picture quality! I admit I am a novice so this post may upset a few folks but I would like to refer you all to a comparison of DLP vs Plasma & LCD that I came across on a DLP Review website which I found very informative. I will not be buying a DLP set until the newer 1980 x 1080 sets come out so I have some time to go but I have read from many posts that many of you feel that a DLP picture is better than that of a Plasma and LCD panel. This website did a comparison test of the major elements between the 3 and to my dismay - it seems that on most counts a DLP set is almost outdone in every area by a Plasma or LCD panel. This leaves me questioning everything and would welcome some input or guidance from you DLP experts! It is a shame that in the UK we have so little choice of DLP sets from which to choose from! Anyway here is a condensed version of the outcome of DLP vs Plasma & DLP vs LCD. For the full articles, I have provided the relevant links so you all can read them for yourselves. I would love to hear all your views on this!

    1. DLP vs Plasma:

    Picture - Plasma
    Clarity - Plasma
    Colour Saturation & Accuracy - Plasma
    Brightness - Individual Preference
    Video Playback - Plasma
    Size - Draw
    Price - DLP
    Value - Need Dependant
    Computer Use - Plasma
    Viewing Angle - Plasma
    Altitude - DLP
    Lifespan - DLP

    2. DLP vs LCD:

    Picture - LCD
    Clarity - LCD
    Colour Saturation - LCD
    Accuracy/Brightness - LCD
    Viewing Angle - LCD
    Computer Use - Draw
    Size/Price - DLP

    For the full reviews of the above, click on the links below:

    http://www.dlptvreview.com/dlptv/plasmatelevision.html

    http://www.dlptvreview.com/dlptv/dlptelevision.html

    Suave!
     
  2. zAndy1

    zAndy1
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    I'll treat that review with the contempt it deserves to be honest...

    Andy
     
  3. DLPhopefull

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    I only had to read to the point of contrast levels to realise this is talking about the early days of DLP sets with 1000:1 contrast levels. DLP has moved on a long way since then.
     
  4. Razor

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    I agree with DLPhopefull
     
  5. ManGina

    ManGina
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    :thumbsdow The only test I rate is the one conducted by my own eyes - and the results are somewhat different to your "interesting" findings... :boring:
     
  6. St_ve

    St_ve
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    Crap review /Display Mate technologies in America award annual awards for a wide range of products
    found the link in Anandtech when i was researching video card quality.Their expertise is in video measurement/ testing.
    They carried out a comparative test last year between CRT : LCD : Plasma : and DLP
    the CRT set was the winner with the best image quality
    Our reference CRT was a Sony PVM-20L5, which is a direct-view professional High Definition studio
    Our LCD selection was the NEC LCD4000, which at the time of our testing was the world's largest
    production direct-view LCD.
    Our plasma selection was the 61 inch NEC 61XM2, which at the time of our testing was the world's largest production plasma panel. This same panel is found in many other high-end plasma displays sold by other manufacturers. In fact, since it's the only panel of this size being manufactured, all 61 inch plasma displays regardless of the brand name use this NEC panel. (The NEC factory was recently purchased by Pioneer and officially changed hands on October 1, 2004. NEC will continue selling the same plasma displays,
    Our DLP selection was the Optoma RD50, which is the only one of the displays in our roundup that is marketed as a home theater display. This unit is based on the Texas Instruments HD2 DMD 1280 x 720 chip with a 6 segment color wheel. TI has since introduced an HD2+ chip that produces a darker black-level and can be used with a new 7 segment color wheel (see below). The new Optoma model with the HD2+ chip and 7 segment color wheel is called the RD50A, which Optoma says has 20% better contrast than the RD50 and includes our recommended Gamma of 2.20, which will improve its already outstanding image quality

    a couple of points to remember
    The CRT set used was a 19" studio monitor they chose for its perfect image quality any CRT set bought in the shops is unlikely to match this for image quality.
    the Optoma RD50 DLP used is the american one with the HD2 chip the UK model of the Optoma RD50 has the HD2+ and would have probably done better still.
    The DLP set also costs far less than the Plasma & LCD it was up against but still managed to beat them both for overall image quality :lesson:

    Here is the link to the full review
    http://www.displaymate.com/ShootOut_Part_1.htm
    and another to the last part
    http://www.displaymate.com/ShootOut_Part_4.htm
     
  7. St_ve

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    A couple of further points i picked up from reading the whole review ( i know i'm daft & the time spent would be better spent watching DVDs :p )

    DLP screens are expensive from $50 to $1000 & can have a large impact on video quality
    The Optoma RD50 (american) last year had the smallest overscan of any DLP they had measured so far at only 1% important for connecting a PC with DVI or HDMI input.
    Having a screen that is too bright can give worse image quality (less is often more)
    the whole article is packed with information & is worth a read. :)
     
  8. Suave

    Suave
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    Hey ManGina

    They are not my findings - I just came across the tests and although finding them interesting as the reviews did not seem biased to me - I admit I am a novice which is why i posted the reviews for all to see & get advice/views/guidance for! I too was shocked so maybe as someone posted, these were earlier DLP models - I do not know. I am drawn to DLP for the follwing reason: Most folks in the UK do not live in open plan large lounges as in the USA where they can hang large plasma/LCD panels on the wall as most UK front rooms are plain boxy and small. Thereby, one mostly either places the panel on a stand or desk or av furniture etc. Now these panels cost more than an equivalent size DLP set. So whether I buy I plasma/LCD or DLP it is going to be on a stand or get put on a desk etc which in my case negates the benefit of the thin factor as all I will have is empty space behind the screen. Therefore, with DLP sets getting thinner and thinner (far less thinner than a CRT) I can go out and buy the largest possible screen I can get (larger than a plasma/LCD) for far less money, it will fit as it go in the same place as the plasma/LCD occupying just a few inches more, have the same picture quality (or better I hope!) and it will offer a more cinematic experience. That was my thinking! Hey Dont you all blame me for those reviews, I just though I would share what I found and exchange views
    - is that not what these forums are all about?

    Suave1
     
  9. St_ve

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    Suave i agree with you 100% if anything puzzles you or u r worried about anything or you think you have interesting information that would benefit other people post it by all means the crap in my post was'nt aimed at you but was my opinion of the report.
    I didn't know anything about the AV side of things untill i walked into Comets last December & saw the Sagem Axium 50" DLP .
    The great thing about these forums is the feedback u get correcting mistakes or confirming information.
     
  10. fleagledog

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    Like ManGina, my comments in other threads about DLP being better than Plasma or LCD were not based on reviews or technical specs. They were based on looking. I am sure that there are Plasmas and LCDs that have a better picture than my Tosh, but when I was looking in Comet, it was obvious to me that the DLPs had the best picture of anything on show there (regardless of price) and that out of the DLPs, the Tosh had the best picture (for me). I will very rarely make a purchase based completely on a review since these are opinions not facts. I prefer to use my own eyes and ears.
     
  11. kourosh

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    i work for sony we have a 42"plasma(42"mrx1)which is sony's top plasma and retails at £5000 my tosh46 dlp beats it hands down and cosys only £1500 :smashin:
     
  12. Razor

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    I definately prefer DLP to plasma. I find the image from a plasma can look flat and very processed. A bit like a computer and not real to life. Objects look superimpossed and dont blend into the picture.

    Well thats my 2 pence worth.
     
  13. jerkyboy

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    The latest What HI FI states

    DLP, Better than Plasma for half the price.
     
  14. albertz

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    Honestly, when i was buying i looked at plasmas first but was persuaded to look at dlp's before i bought.

    There are only a handfull of plasmas out there that are better than dlp's ( well a good one anyway ) i saw a range of different plasmas playing dvd's in a good av shop near me, and only one looked better Pioneer pdp 435xde, but for a hell of alot more!!

    i have a tosh 46" and the picture is fantastic, you cannot get better image quality and screen size for the money.

    Go on,...take the plunge you wont be dissapointed ( unlike all those plasma owners ) :D
     
  15. electrosim2001

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    There is a caveat regarding DLP picture quality, aside from the rainbow effect, which is unfortunate as it does briefly spoil the image on screen.
    It bothers my wife more than me, but it is there and should be mentioned even if its a brief defect.

    It's the colour fringing effect when there is a medium speed pan or tilt.
    It's particularly apparent on close-up faces. I don't know what the effect is known as, but it appears as a contour banding like you see on colour maps showing hill contours. It seems to happen where the speed of the pan across the screen syncs with the speed of the colour wheel.

    I don't know whether it happens on all domestic sets which use a colour wheel but it happens on the Toshiba 46". Other than that the picture is stunning when given a good quality source. Try the Band of Brothers DVD box set and be prepared to be awed.
    Thomas.
     
  16. mdekkers

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    my method of choosing DLP ove LCD or plasma was very simple. One day I walked into comet on unrelated business, wandered over to the televisions, saw the Sagem on display, and had to pick my jaw up from the floor. I just couldn't get the constant buzzing of "want one want one want one NEED ONE want one want one" out of my ears. Much useful info here on AVForums, so I decided to go with the Tosh, and my life now has new meaning. :D

    only downside is that my bank manager will now only talk to me via registered mail in bright red envelopes :rolleyes:
     
  17. Razor

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    You can get band of brothers in HD. :)
     
  18. St_ve

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    On the RD 50 i only see contour banding mainly on underwater scenes when there is very low contrast not all DVDs show this i have also noticed it on telewest movies & very rarely a blue sky can show this.
    The following was lifted from a comparitive review of CRT Pasma LCD & DLP sets :see DLP weakest points the DLP set in the tests had a HD2 chip

    DLP Special issues: Most DLP projectors use only a single DMD chip together with a high-speed rotating color wheel in order to sequentially generate the primary colors needed to produce a full color picture. A similar color wheel concept was used for the first color television broadcasts in 1951 and for the color television broadcasts from the Moon in 1971. The color wheel offers a number of major advantages: much lower projector cost and size and perfect color registration. The color wheel also has some disadvantages: lower light efficiency because only one primary color is in use at a time so light for the other two is wasted, a reduced number of digital gray-scale levels because the Pulse Width Modulation cycle is time-shared by all three primary colors, and the most curious effect of all are rainbow artifacts that are occasionally seen by some people.
    The rainbows arise because the red, green and blue primary color images are drawn in sequence at slightly different times. If there is any rapid eye or head motion the color sequences will appear in slightly different locations on the retina. That produces a temporarily mis-registered triple image, which is ordinarily not very noticeable in most photographic style images. However, when the image contains bright-white compact objects on a dark background it then appears as a red, green and blue triplet that looks like a prism or rainbow image of the object.
    Most people generally aren't aware of these rainbow artifacts, but I believe that most people will see them under the circumstances mentioned above when viewing the screen up close in a completely dark room, which seems to increase the incidence of rapid eye movements because there aren't any visual points of reference in the dark. I see rainbows almost constantly when I'm working with test patterns up close to the screen and in the dark, but I see them only rarely when I'm viewing normal video content nine feet back in a dimly lit room. Spacecraft scenes in science fiction movies (like 2001: A Space Odyssey) are the “best” place to determine if you may be sensitive to rainbows. If you are, try a DLP projector with the highest speed color wheel available, which is currently 10,800 RPM.

    DLP Strongest Points: Darkest black-level and highest Dynamic Range of all the flat-panels ● Closest match to CRT Gamma and primary colors ● Perfect color registration for units with a color wheel ● High pixel fill factor of 90 percent produces a smooth yet sharp image with no apparent pixelation except close up to the screen ● Pixel intensities generated by the digital DMD chip are digitally precise, stable and reproducible ● Very fast pixel response times and few motion artifacts ● Native ATSC Mode 1280 x 720 for the HD2 chips means some HD content doesn't require rescaling and also allows scaling by other video components that can generate 1280 x 720 ● Very little aging effects other than lamp dimming and replacement.

    DLP Weakest Points: Spatial and temporal dithering produce some noise and false contouring in dark images ● Color wheel rainbow artifacts ● Possible visual fatigue due to temporal dithering and rainbow artifacts. Some people report significant discomfort but most people don't appear to be affected ● Direct-view not available – projection only ● Fixed native resolution. Rescaling required for other resolution formats ● Noise from the color wheel and cooling fans.

    Other DLP Artifacts: Pixels are a bit softer than direct-view displays due to the rear projection optics and screen ● Irregularities and dithering noise at the dark-end of the gray-scale due to insufficient bit-depth in signal processing ● Intentional variation in brightness with viewing angle produced by the rear projection screen so as to maximize the luminance at normal viewing angles.

    DLP Computer Application Viewing tests: Image and picture quality was excellent for computer applications. DisplayMate test patterns and InfoComm ShootOut photographic images were rendered accurately. Pixels are a bit softer than the direct-view flat panels because of the rear projection optics and screen. Contrast for fine text and graphics was also lower than the direct-view flat panels for the same reason. A slight overscan (when the image is larger than the screen size) resulted in the loss of 1 percent of the image pixels on each side, which can be a problem for some computer applications. (Note that the Optoma's 1 percent overscan is the smallest of any rear projection display.)

    DLP Video Application Viewing Tests: For video the picture quality was outstanding, with an excellent match to the reference CRT monitor, but on a much larger screen, an impressive achievement. Dithering noise was occasionally noticeable in dark scenes. These effects should be much less noticeable on the new higher resolution displays. As with most rear projection units there was a significant variation in brightness with viewing angle, which is intentionally introduced by the projection screen in order to maximize the luminance at normal audience viewing angles. However, there is no variation of Dynamic Range, hue or saturation with viewing angle.
     

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