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DLP vs LCD

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by z250p60, Jul 29, 2001.

  1. z250p60

    z250p60
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    May i know which type of projector is better for movies ?. Is it digital light processing or liquid crystal display type of projectors ?.
    I was told that DLP is better for movies since it provides a high contrast ratio as compared to LCD. Some people say otherwise with LCD being better because of its high brightness as compared to DLP. :confused:
     
  2. ReTrO

    ReTrO
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    DLP,so long as the rainbow effect doesn't annoy you, or you can't see it.

    LCD is cheaper, DLP is a lower res for the same price, due to being a new technology.
     
  3. meva

    meva
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    I'm loathe to buy another lcd unit because of the possibility of dead pixels.Any retailers out there who offer a defective pixel free guarantee?( I kow dlp's get dead pixels but they seem far less likely and manufacturers seem more willing to accept them as a manufacturing defect and replace the unit)

    [ 29-07-2001: Message edited by: meva ]
     
  4. LV426

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    The main drawback of LCDs is relatively poor black levels; some light leaks through black parts of the image, making it appear grey. The extent to which this is true depends on the projector, and they are improving all the time. And, some people are clearly more bothered by this than others. My Sony VW10HT is generally acknowledged to suffer from this, but I do not find it an annoyance. Contrary to popular belief, it does NOT mean less definition in dark areas - provided the thing is set up correctly.

    There is the issue of failed pixels. Typically, pixels fail in manufacture; they don't fail in use. Therefore, if you have the opportunity to try before you buy, and you find a "good" one, you should have no further problems.

    There is also the issue of dust in the optics. This manifests itself as diffuse patches of colour (green is the most noticeable) which become clearly defined if you de-focus the projector. These can be removed by using an engineer's compressed air spray to blow the optics clean.

    The main disadvantage of DLPs is their cost and, linked to this, the effect referred to as the DLP rainbow. On a DLP machine, the picture in the screen is not a constant colour. It alternates, quickly, between red, green and blue. Normally, your brain merges the three colours together and you "see" a full colour image. However, for some people (yes, I am one of them) on fast moving objects, or if you pan your eyes across the screen, you can see traces of these three colours around contrasty edges - this is the DLP rainbow. Newer models increase the frequency at which the colours are displayed, which reduces this effect.

    Some DLPs also have sealed optics which makes the ingress of dust a non-issue for these machines. I guess there's no technical reason why an LCD shouldn't have sealed optics, but AFAIK, nobody makes such a machine, yet. My VW10HT is over a year old, 600 hours' use, and, as yet, I haven't needed to clean it, although there is one dust particle that is just visible on a pure black picture, and I will get around to blowing it out, soon.

    Finally, there is the issue of resolution. Typically, pound for pound, an LCD projector will have more pixels than a DLP one. This theoretically makes for a smoother image, although this is offset, to some extent, by the amount of black space between each pixel. On DLPs this is less than on an LCD with the same number of pixels - so the gaps are less visible on DLP. This effect is known as chicken wire.

    AFAIK, the Sony VW10HT has more pixels than anything else - a million on each of its three LCD panels - and, on an 8ft wide screen, at a viewing distance of about 10 ft., the individual pixels are not visible at all.

    At the end of the day, it's your cash, and my advice is to get demonstrations of good examples of both types, and make your own mind up. Note, however, that the DLP rainbow, for those who CAN see it, is very distracting. I couldn't bear it. Therefore, even if you can't see it, make sure you take along any other members of your family, etc., who are going to share your cimema with you, to make sure they aren't affected, either. It would be a shame if your partner couldn't enjoy your cinema with you because they have "fast" eyes, like I do.

    [ 30-07-2001: Message edited by: LV426 ]
     
  5. meva

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    lcd projectors only have more pixels because they need them,any of the pixels on a single chip dlp can be made red green or blue by the colour wheel.Only one third of the pixels in an lcd projector can be any of the primary colours (rgb).<br />An svga lcd needs 1440000 pixels whereas an svga dlp only needs 480,000, the resolution is the same.
     

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