1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Dlp - Prog Scan, Pc, & Other Tweaks

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by timothywood, Jan 19, 2003.

  1. timothywood

    timothywood
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2003
    Messages:
    29
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +0
    As previous thread I am in the process of either going CRT or DLP.
    DLP choice is Sharp XV-Z90E. I have read through many other articles which make reference to progressive scan (which I think I have now understood) Am I correct in thinking that if I go down the Sharp route I just need to make sure DVD has prog scan output and then connect up using comp video leads - also I only have R2 discs - is it only R1 that can benefit from prog scan ?

    Other tweaks seem to include using a PC - for what and for what cost ? (does the spec of your PC have a bearing ?) also others have made comments about ISCOII lens - Seems this converts 4:3 image to 16:9 but also any positive effects ? Also do line doublers/scalers improve things also idea of cost

    Only likely to watch DVD's on projector, maybe video

    I have now had chance to see both CRT and the above DLP. DLP seems to have a "grain" effect on background whereas CRT was clearer. Black detail also a little better.
     
  2. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    13,977
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Living in Surrey, covering UK!
    Ratings:
    +2,779
    Timothy: Greatpost.....

    OK: Fixed pixel projectors work in a progressive manner. This means they de-interlace signal themsleves to get you a prog scan image. DVD players also have the ability to do this these days. Which one is better is down to the quality of the DVD and Projector in question.

    PAL and NTSC DVD's and normal TV can benefit from good video de-interlacing from either projector or DVD player. To understand or see what these benefits are you need to find a competent dealer or come to one of my EVENTS that I organise for just this purpose.

    Using a PC intead of a DVD can also give aseriously good image. However, notall PC's are the same quality. Many are poor and some are good. If you are doing it yourself with no frame of reference I have to say you are wasting your money.

    Gordon
     
  3. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2001
    Messages:
    12,143
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Surrey. UK.
    Ratings:
    +1,954
    A lot of the newer projectors have excellent built in scaling/deinterlacing, along with improved contrast to older models, so can be used with an ordinary DVD player and give a very good picture.

    I bought an early DLP pj which had a poor scaler, and gave a washed out and jaggy edged (but watchable) image via my Samsung 709 DVD player.

    Switching to an HTPC improved the picture immeasurably. If you go the HTPC route, make sure you use a Radeon graphics card for the best image at an affordable price. HTPCs can be built for as little as £250 if you go for something like a 1gig Duron and 128meg ram. You'll only need a 5.1 capable sound card for full DD/DTS sound. A PC gives a progressive signal anyway, so either PAL or NTSC DVDs will be progressive to the projector. You can spend a lot more than this on better speced components, but the returns will be negligable.

    A PC will give you a lot of flexibility but with the compromise of ease of use. They can be made remote controlable though. I am using mine to play an intro, trailers and then the DVD, all via a single click of the mouse.

    You also get great image manipulation too, so you can increase/reduce the image size or move it around the screen - this can be very useful if you have a 16:9 screen when watching a 2.35:1 movie, as you can move the smaller height image up or down in the screen, and just mask one edge rather than both at top and bottom. A similar thing can be done if you have a 4:3 screen.

    You could even expamd the 2.35 image up so that it fills the 16:9 screen completely, albeit with a loss of image of the sides. Not ideal, but an option.

    I don't think you'll see such an improvement alongside something like an NEC HT1000 or similar spec pj which come with Faroudja scalers built in, but the flexibilty is enormous. Far too much to list here. :)

    The advantage of an ISCO or Panamorph, is that you are utelising the 4:3 pjs entire panel, and squeezing it optically, rather than by dropping lines of resolution to get the correct ratio image. You don't lose any lumens this way either, so you keep the pjs brightness.

    The only thing with an ISCO is that it actualy widens the image, so that if you should remove it, your pj will be too close to the screen, and will have to be moved back around a third of the distance again to fill the screen width. Anything that was not anamorphic would require this to be done, unless you were using a pc to arteficialy make the DVD image taller, so that the lens would squish it back down to normal.

    A Panamorp lens works in a similar fashion, but only alters the height, so the pj can stay where it is if you need to remove the lens. The Panamorph comes on a rail system to allow this to be done easily. Both give some kind of barrel distortion at the outer edges which can normaly be hidden by overscanning the screen a litlle.

    HTH

    Gary.
     

Share This Page

Loading...