DIY. Tools and gear to build a cabinet

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by dUnKle, Jun 12, 2015.

  1. dUnKle

    dUnKle
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    My dad is BRILLIANT at DIY
    Proper dad and he can do anything
    He has done loads for me over the years and I have picked up a few things

    I've just built my first project with the least amount of help, that being a wheely bin shed
    However I want to have a go at building a cabinet for the front room

    Nothing special, something that can store daughters toys in and have my amp / Xbox on top

    Have plans in mind and just need sort out dimensions but I want to try and do it on my own to surprise my dad

    So what tools etc should I need
    I already have three decent drills and a garage full of screws of various sizes and quality

    I have a circular saw I got to cut my decking and build my wheely bin shed, but I need a good quality hand saw for the finer cuts, can anyone recommend one ?

    Also, how can I ensure I get everything at correct angles etc ?

    Cheers
     
  2. Rorifett

    Rorifett
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    What sort of joints are you doing? That's the biggest starting point for me for something like this, I'd want hidden joints where possible, if they were to be seen I'd go for dovetails.

    Depending on whatever solution you're opting for really dictates what tools you need.
     
  3. ldoodle

    ldoodle
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    capture1.png

    All cuts: circular saw with home made straight edge guide
    Joinery: glued dowels using a dowel/shelf pin jig (the shelf the receiver is on and the one above it are adjustable

    No screws in sight.

    Sanded with random orbital sander.

    Circular saw guide: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20808204,00.html
    Dowel jig: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wolfcraft-794126-Dowelling-Jig-10/dp/B0002YYWK8
    Blade: http://www.tooled-up.com/product/bo...-saw-blade-190mm-x-60-teeth-30mm-bore/136154/

    Get a hight tooth count blade for your circular saw, like the one above. Super clean cuts on MDF (and even the decking I did last month)

    Cut similar pieces at the same time so they are truly the same (as long as cut depth of blade allows). For example:

    3 long horizontal pieces
    2 side pieces
    2 shelves

    Set blade depth just deeper than stock you're cutting (a couple of mm)

    If you're planning on using melamine (MFC) board, I'd suggest getting a special blade (triple chip): http://www.powertoolworld.co.uk/tre...90mm-x-60-teeth-x-30mm-super-fine-finish.html to keep the cuts as clean as possible. I've not personally used such a blade but I've read a lot of great stuff about them for MFC.
     
  4. ldoodle

    ldoodle
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    PS: Before assembly, I rounded over (block blane and hand sanded) all the edges, except the 4 outer ones. And I set back the innerds by about 5 or 6 mm.

    Oh, and get some parallel bar/jaw clamps. They'll keep it square.

    Buy Dakota Parallel Jaw Clamps online at Rutlands.co.uk
     
  5. Rorifett

    Rorifett
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    What's the deal with the wee ? looking thing on the rim?
     
  6. ldoodle

    ldoodle
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    You mean the 4 little 'hook' things?

    Expansion Slots: (Carbide tipped circular saw)
    The basic function of the expansion slots, which are used primarily on larger diameter blades is to create an outlet for heat buildup created during cutting. For example, imagine a 10" piece of steel with 60 or 80 carbide teeth turning at a speed of 6,000 RPM entering a piece of hard wood such as oak. A great deal of heat is built up by a combination of factors; including friction, contrifical force and the cutting material itself. Even the very best steel blade will heat up to a point where the heat is great enough to force the steel to expand. When this happens the heat (or forced expansion) must have an outlet. The expansion slots allow the steel to do just that, expand and contract without warping the steel or destroying the tension of the blade.

    Saw Blade Glossary
     
  7. Rorifett

    Rorifett
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    Yeah the little hook things, I'd just stupidly presumed the heat dissipation would have been just through the teeth itself.
     
  8. dUnKle

    dUnKle
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    Id love to do "real" joints, but think thats where my skill would let me down
    Will likely setting, as mentioned above, dowel joints as, for my skill, its going to be easier

    Id love to do dovetail, but a million years from being able to do that

    Think even mortise / tenon may be a little too much
    Maybe, just maybe, I could manage to do a corner halving joint and dowel that
     
  9. its_all_Greek

    its_all_Greek
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    Get some scrap pieces of wood and practice your joints with on them.
     
  10. ldoodle

    ldoodle
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  11. clc.sheff

    clc.sheff
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    A Router for many jobs is the difference between good work and pro work IMO. Even a cheapish one will do. Just buy decent cutters.

    Another beginners tip would be to make yourself a home made circular saw guide rail out of some plywood. ( as long as it has one machined straight edge already )
     
  12. dUnKle

    dUnKle
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  13. plasmame

    plasmame
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    If I was you I would design the unit using sketchup it's free and easy to use, then create a cutting list from the drawing and get the mdf cut at the timber merchants when you buy the sheets. Then all your cuts will be the correct size and square, you'll only need to glue and assemble the unit and finish it however you want.
     
  14. dUnKle

    dUnKle
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    Brilliant
     
  15. ldoodle

    ldoodle
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    That takes all the fun out of it. I got mine cut to rough size to save me working with full sheets at home, and getting them in the car.
     
  16. dUnKle

    dUnKle
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    Well I know its a little much, but went and got a table saw from Screw Fix

    Titan TTB554TAS 250mm Table Saw 230-240V | Table Saws | Screwfix.com to be exact

    It seemed ideal for the money and has got some great reviews and seemed to be great for home DIY with plenty of good reviews suggesting as much

    However, despite having two large extensions at the side to rest your material on, unless im missing something, it seems the most you can cut, using the guide (rip fence?) is about 6 to 7 inches ?

    Im guessing this cant be the case as, whilst one review touches on it, I cant believe everyone else just wants to make such small cuts ?

    What am I missing ?

    The instructions are far from the easiest to follow
     
  17. nag1_uk

    nag1_uk
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    I bought the Kregg K4 jigg for jointing wood.
    It works very well. Its a little expensive, but is quite simple to use and joints well, so long as you clamp the bits in place first. You just have to use the right screws for the right bits of wood.
    Kreg Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools
     

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